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advising

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    Erin: So this video is an overview of
    how to conduct an advising session,
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    from both perspective of the faculty adviser and
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    the Student Success and Advising Office.
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    So, I'm Erin Baumgartner, currently
    Director of General Education,
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    but also a Biology Faculty adviser.
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    Nikki: And I'm Nikki Weight. The Director
    for Student Success and Advising.
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    Erin: So what we're going to do today,
    is we're just going to walk you through,
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    sort of a basic advising session
    from beginning to end,
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    and share some of the associated
    resources that go with that.
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    Now, if you're relatively new to advising,
    you're going to have the opportunity
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    to kind of connect with Nikki's office
    for some of their resources,
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    and we'll get to those in just a minute.
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    But first we're going to kind of
    just start with the process
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    of how do you figure out who your advisees
    are and how to connect with them.
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    So the easiest way to do that is
    by going through the Portal,
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    and if you just click on Wolf Web,
    you'll go to the Faculty Menu,
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    and your advisers menu, and then you can
    just click on your Advisee Listing.
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    Now I'm not going to click on that right now, because I have some advisees in there
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    and their information is confidential, but this would basically bring up a list of my advisees.
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    And then what I normally do is, I simply
    set up in Google Forms,
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    I'll make a little list of an advising schedule,
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    and what that's going to do is, I'll send
    out the Google Forms link to my advisees,
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    so that they can sign up for their advising time.
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    And then they can fill that in,
    with the time that they want,
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    they can edit it online,
    they can make changes if they need to,
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    and it makes it really, really easy. They don't have to come in and see me to sign up.
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    They just have to do it on the Google Form.
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    Nikki: And then for Student Success and Advising,
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    for any students that come in for
    advising through our office,
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    we use the Wolf Connection System
    for our advising appointments.
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    That is a feature that if you are
    interested in utilizing,
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    we can connect our offices to see
    about going to get this set up.
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    A benefit of Wolf Connection System for our office,
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    is that it allows us to track our notes in there.
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    It also is available if other advisers use WCS,
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    that they can see past history with a student.
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    But, having an online scheduling format is
    really beneficial for students.
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    They can easily get in touch - they're
    not waiting to hear back from an email,
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    or trying to figure out when your office hours are if they're not in one of your classes,
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    so that way their time is set aside, so
    that we're able to focus on that student
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    when they come in for advising.
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    Erin: Ok. So at the beginning of an advising session, especially if I'm with a new student,
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    what I like to do is make sure that I
    have Degree Tracks up before they come in.
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    So, to get to Degree Tracks, you're still
    going to use the Advisers Menu,
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    and then you'll just select Degree Tracks,
    it'll ask you for the term,
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    and then you'll go to Degree Tracks.
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    Now, we already have one set up. We
    have a simulated student account here.
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    So, what I would do is I would take
    a look at this ahead of time,
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    I would look at where my students are.
    And it'll tell me kind of where they are
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    with their academic standing and that's an
    important thing to know.
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    And we're going to talk about what that means,
    what those academic standing information means.
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    So I'm going to let Nikki say a
    little bit more about that.
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    Nikki: So, any student at Western that is not in good standing,
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    they could be on Academic Warning,
    Probation, Continued Probation
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    from a past semester, or they could
    be on Academic Suspension.
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    Any student that falls into
    one of these categories,
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    if you see that listed on Degree Tracks,
    our office does advise them,
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    and work with them to make sure that any
    challenges or barriers they're having,
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    that we're connecting with resources.
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    So I'm going to explain a little bit of
    the process of what our office requires
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    of standing students, so if you see a
    student that is on warning or probation
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    or suspension, you can refer them
    to our office, but then also you can
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    check up and see how they're doing,
    and see if they've connected with us,
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    and then we kind of try to loop
    that full circle to refer them
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    back to their assigned adviser.
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    A student is placed on Academic Warning
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    if their term GPA drops below a 2.0.
    If they're on Academic Warning,
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    and the following term they continue to
    have a term GPA of below a 2.0,
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    they move to Academic Probation,
    and if that happens again,
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    they're placed on Suspension.
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    Students that have a Warning or Probation,
    and their next term they get above a 2.0
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    GPA, are placed back in good standing,
    so you may see some fluctuation,
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    if they only take one class, or if
    they took it over the summer,
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    it may change really quickly.
    What happens if a student is placed
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    on Warning or Probation or Suspension,
    is that at the end of every term,
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    once grades have been submitted
    to the Registrar's Office,
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    the Registrar's Office will send
    the official notification
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    to that student of what their
    Academic Standing is and then
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    in that notification they are referred to
    the Student Success and Advising Office.
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    We have two different tracks for students
    that are in less than good standing,
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    just based on, how close they are to
    reaching academic suspension.
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    Students on Warning have two options.
    They can complete an online
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    Student Success Workshop, that
    goes over what Warning is,
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    and what resources are available to them,
    but also just refers them to our office.
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    Or they can just meet with an
    Academic Success Adviser.
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    Those students who are on Academic
    Probation since it's their
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    second term below a 2.0,
    we want them to come and meet
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    with someone just to make sure that
    we're addressing what their needs are.
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    Students who are on Academic Warning or
    Probation, they receive a registration
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    hold on the first day of the term or
    at some point after that email.
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    And that's just an incentive for them to
    come and actually do the workshop
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    or come and see us so that they know what it
    means for their standing
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    and resources to help them.
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    If students are placed on Academic
    Suspension, they actually have
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    to sit out for at least one term before
    being able to resume classes, and if
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    they happen to get a second Suspension,
    that they're required to sit out a year.
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    Our office works with the students who
    are returning after that break.
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    They are required to take a Learning
    Seminar class their first term back,
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    and that is taught by staff in
    Student Success and Advising.
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    Attached to this presentation on our
    website, there will be a handout
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    with some helpful resources for doing
    your first advising session.
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    In that resource, there'll be kind of a
    one page cheat sheet
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    for the Academic Standing flow chart, so
    you can also refer to that for questions
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    on how Academic Standing works. Our
    biggest hope with Academic Standing is
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    that we're just getting the student connected
    with all the appropriate resources
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    and helping them overcome whatever
    challenges they faced in dropping below
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    that GPA and helping them get back on track.
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    Erin: So, a good reason to be aware of where
    students are with their academic standing
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    is because that's part of
    the conversation I like to have
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    with them when they come in.
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    So, if this is a new advisee I will
    probably just start with getting to know
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    them a little bit better,
    asking them a few questions about,
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    sort of, what's, you know, what's brought them to college, what are their goals,
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    what are they hoping to get out of their time here,
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    and also to just kinda get
    a sense for who they are.
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    And then, at the same time,
    I'm gonna walk them through
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    the DegreeTracks system so that
    they know how to use it too.
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    So DegreeTracks, and this is really important,
    the DegreeTracks is actually
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    the university's official record of the
    degree requirements for each student.
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    So if students want to see kind of where
    they are in their progress towards degree,
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    DegreeTracks is the best place to go.
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    The requirements in DegreeTracks align
    to the requirements in the catalog.
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    So if, for some reason,
    a program is looking to alter
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    what's in DegreeTracks, they need to do that
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    through the curriculum proposal process.
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    Of course, what that means is sometimes
    between years when there are program changes,
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    depending on the student's catalog year, which is gonna be listed here under their Catalog Term,
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    if they are--if the program requirements
    have changed and they're using
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    a different catalog term,
    those may be different in DegreeTracks.
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    So that's an important thing to be aware of.
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    The other thing to be aware of
    is that if a requirement is not marked
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    as complete in DegreeTracks,
    this little green check box here,
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    then it is not marked as complete
    in the Registrar's Office.
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    Sometimes people make
    a mistaken assumption that,
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    well it's not marked off in DegreeTracks
    but the Registrar's Office knows about it.
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    If it's not in Degree Tracks, it is a safe bet that
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    the Registrar's Office does not
    have it recorded as well.
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    The blue sort of squiggle here,
    what that shows is a degree requirement
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    that's in progress, and then if it's red
    and not filled in then we know that
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    that requirement is not quite complete.
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    So those are things to sort of
    work students through.
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    Now sometimes it's necessary to make
    an exception or a substitution.
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    For example, if a student transfers something in,
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    so here we have some students who
    transferred in some biology classes,
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    these are articulated from Chemeketa,
    but let's imagine that a student transferred
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    something in from a college on the
    east coast where we don't have
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    an articulation agreement,
    if someone is making a substitution
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    or an exception to a requirement here
    that's usually a department head
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    or a division chair, somebody like that,
    that's gonna be noted in here as well,
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    so that is something that students can look for.
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    And so those can be made in DegreeTracks.
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    One thing to be aware of is that if
    an exception is entered in DegreeTracks,
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    it does not affect the prerequisites at registration,
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    so a student may still have to
    get that blue add/drop form signed
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    if they don't have a prerequisite, even though that is checked off in DegreeTracks.
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    So that is one little funny quirk there.
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    So, I like to go over kind of all
    of the basics of DegreeTracks
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    with students so that they know how
    to read this and interpret it, and then,
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    as we talk about their plans for the academic year,
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    what I will do is I will add notes in DegreeTracks,
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    and I just do that by adding a note.
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    You can choose a pre-defined note,
    but what I usually do is I like to kind of
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    do a custom note, and I might describe
    what the student, what classes
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    we talked about, if I recommended they
    take a placement test before next term,
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    something along those lines,
    and what's really great is I can always
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    go back to those notes, but so can the student,
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    so it's of course really important
    to remember that your student advisees
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    can see everything that you put in these notes.
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    So if they are frustrating you,
    maybe that's something
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    to write down some place else.
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    But the other thing that's nice
    here is if a student decides
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    to change their major,
    or change their advising plans,
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    then as they move forward, their new adviser will also have access to these notes.
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    Nikki: Just a note on the note section,
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    oftentimes there will come a situation
    in the future where a student
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    will look back and say,
    "Well my adviser told me A, B, and C",
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    and it's really helpful to have those
    notes written down at the time
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    so that it doesn't become a
    "he said, she said" scenario.
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    So I use notes, not only for you know,
    a resource for the student
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    and when they come back to meet with me,
    but also as we talked about
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    degree requirements and things they need
    to get done, like prerequisites
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    or specific graduation requirements,
    that I can look back and say,
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    "Look on this date is when we
    discussed these requirements",
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    so that's recorded if it ever,
    a student ever tries to petition it
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    or question it down the road.
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    The thing I also like to do with the notes is, as
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    Erin mentioned, those introductory
    conversations asking about why
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    they're at Western, or what their career goals are,
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    the next time the student comes in
    I can review those notes before they come
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    in and ask them kind of a follow-up
    on our conversations from last time.
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    I get really funny reactions from students
    when I do that because
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    they think I have this great memory,
    and that I just pulled that off
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    the top of my hat, but really I
    just pulled it from their notes,
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    but it really helps me keep that
    sense of connection with the students
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    as we move forward, that they really do
    feel like I care about what's going on
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    in their life, and I care about what
    they're doing with their degree,
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    and so as we move further along their degree path
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    and away from more of the new student,
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    where we have to go through this is
    DegreeTracks, these are your generals,
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    these are your major requirements,
    and we move more into how do we
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    prepare you for graduation or graduate
    school or internships that we've developed
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    that rapport over time
    and we can kind of shift that focus.
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    DegreeTracks is a really great tool
    and my expectation when I advise
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    is early on I'll teach students
    very much how to use it,
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    but then over time I want them to be
    using it themselves and then coming to me
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    with questions, rather than just them
    assuming that I'm going to tell them.
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    One area I think that is not very obvious
    for students that I always
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    like to point out is right here at the top
    of the screen where it has the
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    degree requirements, I think it's fairly
    straightforward to explain like
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    the check boxes and you haven't
    met these degrees,
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    but a lot of students aren't aware
    that you need 180 credits to graduate
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    and you have to have so many upper
    division credits and if they're a transfer
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    student they have to have 45 of their
    last credits at Western for that to count
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    and so they're not reaching
    graduation and having 11
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    elective credits to graduate,
    but their lower division electives
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    didn't count because they
    weren't the upper division.
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    So that's an area both Erin and I really
    try to make sure students
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    are aware of very early on that's
    not kind of a checklist type.
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    The other feature of DegreeWorks,
    DegreeTracks, that I use fairly regularly
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    is over on the left-hand side
    there's this "What If" option.
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    This is really helpful if a student
    is not 100% sure if the major
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    they're currently in is the right fit,
    or if they want to add a minor,
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    and this allows them to add whatever
    changes they would wanna make
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    and see what their worksheet would
    look like under the new requirements.
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    Now in this test environment it
    doesn't let us pick the major or minor,
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    but what you would typically do, and
    the student is able to do this as well,
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    so usually I'll just show them how to do it
    and allow them to go and do it themselves
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    is under the "Select Additional Areas"
    under the primary--make sure you pick
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    the most recent academic year,
    and then under the major, select
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    the most recent one and then
    you can also add a minor or a concentration.
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    They'll show up under the chosen
    area of study drop list
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    and once they have shown up
    there you go back up
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    to the process "What If" button at the top.
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    And it will look the exact same as their
    current worksheet just with
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    the updated information,
    so the student will be able to see
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    how close they may be to
    finishing a minor in one area,
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    or how close they may be if they
    decide to switch majors so that
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    can be a really helpful feature if,
    or another option is if they're pre-major.
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    For example, if they're currently looking
    at going to pre-nursing but they
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    want to maybe have a backup degree
    like biology or something else,
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    you can do a What If for if they stay
    in your major that they have a plan
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    of what they should be working on
    while they're maybe pursuing
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    alternative plans at the same time.
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    Erin: Yeah, and this brings up a really good point.
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    One of the conversations I
    regularly have with students,
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    especially early in their degree process
    is oftentimes they will come in
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    and I will simply ask them you know,
    "How are things?
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    How are things going with your major right now?
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    Tell me a little about your classes."
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    And that gives us an opportunity
    to have some conversations,
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    especially when they start to recognize that maybe
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    they want to make a change to their major.
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    And that can be a really important conversation.
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    I find oftentimes students aren't
    always comfortable opening
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    that conversation because they
    mistakenly feel like they have to stay
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    committed to their major.
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    I have had several students worry
    that they would hurt my feelings
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    by wanting to change majors.
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    So by opening that conversation
    with them I think it gives them
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    an opportunity to kind of ask
    the questions that they need to ask,
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    and then we have the opportunity
    to investigate what happens when
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    we want to make a change to a major.
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    And so, the way to do that is the
    university Registrar's Office,
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    if you go to "Forms", there is a form,
    the "Major/Minor/Adviser Change Form"
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    which is a PDF.
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    I think I'm clicking the right button.
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    And so, this is an opportunity if students
    do decide they wanna change their major,
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    or add a minor, or perhaps they want
    to choose a different catalog year
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    because they want some,
    the major was just updated this year
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    and they wanna come in under those requirements.
  • 17:00 - 17:02
    This is the form that you use to do that.
  • 17:02 - 17:06
    It's really straightforward, it's
    form-fillable, put all the
  • 17:06 - 17:10
    student information up here,
    depending on what they're doing
  • 17:10 - 17:12
    you just mark all the intended changes.
  • 17:12 - 17:16
    Most frequently for me, that's a change of major.
  • 17:16 - 17:20
    Occasionally it's a change of catalog
    year, because I advise pre-biology
  • 17:20 - 17:24
    sometimes it's also a change of advisor.
  • 17:24 - 17:27
    And then you can make a note of what
    their major is, and then what happens
  • 17:27 - 17:35
    down here is this is going to be listed
    and signed by the advisor for the major
  • 17:35 - 17:37
    that they are switching into.
  • 17:37 - 17:41
    So if they come to see me because they
    want to switch into biology I would
  • 17:41 - 17:43
    complete this and sign off on it for them.
  • 17:43 - 17:48
    But if they are wanting to leave biology,
    I might get them--help them get started
  • 17:48 - 17:54
    with this, but ultimately they are going
    to need to go to whatever department
  • 17:54 - 17:57
    program is going to be taking them in.
  • 17:57 - 18:01
    And if you're not sure about that there's
    a really good way to find out,
  • 18:01 - 18:07
    and that's through the Student
    Success and Advising Office website,
  • 18:07 - 18:10
    and there's this advising contact sheet.
  • 18:10 - 18:15
    So let's imagine we wanted to find out
    who a student needed for biology,
  • 18:15 - 18:19
    it's got all the information,
    Cinda DeVoe is our academic
  • 18:19 - 18:25
    program administrator,
    we're gonna give her those forms to file.
  • 18:25 - 18:28
    But then we can see who all the
    different advisers are as well.
  • 18:28 - 18:33
    So, if for example, a student is
    interested in pre-med we'd wanna
  • 18:33 - 18:35
    make sure they go see Dr. Baltzley.
  • 18:35 - 18:38
    If they're not sure he would also
    be a good person to talk to because
  • 18:38 - 18:40
    he's the department head.
  • 18:40 - 18:43
    But let's say maybe a student
    is interested in botany,
  • 18:43 - 18:45
    that would be perhaps Dr. Howard.
  • 18:45 - 18:48
    So this gives you an opportunity
    to kind of help them so that
  • 18:48 - 18:50
    they're not chasing around
    all over campus.
  • 18:50 - 18:52
    This is a really helpful resource.
  • 18:53 - 18:56
    [Nikki]
    And with the changing majors,
  • 18:56 - 19:00
    once the student has taken the new form
    to the correct department,
  • 19:00 - 19:06
    that department will assign the student
    an advisor and get the form
  • 19:06 - 19:09
    over to the Registrar's office so that
    the student's curriculum is changed
  • 19:09 - 19:13
    so that way their DegreeTracks
    shows up accurately.
  • 19:13 - 19:16
    Couple things of note with
    the change of major form
  • 19:16 - 19:20
    is I try to keep copies of them.
  • 19:20 - 19:23
    Often times if it doesn't make it
    from the department to the
  • 19:23 - 19:25
    Registrar's Office and the student
    is emailing saying,
  • 19:25 - 19:27
    "Why hasn't my DegreeTracks updated?"
  • 19:27 - 19:30
    Or they haven't been assigned
    to you as an advisee,
  • 19:30 - 19:32
    that can cause some frustration
    so keeping record of when that
  • 19:32 - 19:35
    was submitted so that you
    can quickly submit it again.
  • 19:35 - 19:39
    One thing to note is if the student
    is coming to you and they want to change
  • 19:39 - 19:43
    into your major,
    and they have an advising hold,
  • 19:43 - 19:47
    you may not be able to remove
    that hold right away.
  • 19:47 - 19:50
    One thing to note with
    Western Oregon University is we do
  • 19:50 - 19:53
    require every student every term
    to meet with their assigned
  • 19:53 - 19:59
    academic advisor so their changing majors
    and that assigned adviser changes
  • 19:59 - 20:05
    then that may require a little bit
    of emailing with their current advisor.
  • 20:05 - 20:11
    And Erin pulled up the advisor menu again
    and when you have a student you want
  • 20:11 - 20:15
    to remove a hold for you go
    to the same advisor menu,
  • 20:15 - 20:19
    instead of going to advisee listing you
    go to remove advisor hold
  • 20:19 - 20:22
    and they'll be a check box there you
    can select advisee's name and remove it
  • 20:22 - 20:24
    after you've met with them.
  • 20:24 - 20:27
    There is a search bar you can
    enter a student's information,
  • 20:27 - 20:31
    but if you get an error that says, "You
    do not have access to remove this hold",
  • 20:31 - 20:34
    that's because you haven't been
    assigned as the advisor yet,
  • 20:34 - 20:40
    then you can often times I'm just
    calling whoever their past advisor
  • 20:40 - 20:42
    was and just say,
    "We met.
  • 20:42 - 20:45
    We're changing their major.
    Can you remove the hold?"
  • 20:45 - 20:48
    On kind of that same note,
    if a student knows that their
  • 20:48 - 20:51
    current major is not a good fit,
    that they don't quite have a,
  • 20:51 - 20:56
    "What next?",
    they're not necessarily need to stay
  • 20:56 - 21:00
    in their current major that
    is one of the resources the
  • 21:00 - 21:03
    Student Success and Advising Office
    provides at Western
  • 21:03 - 21:06
    is advising students who are exploratory.
  • 21:06 - 21:09
    And just in case you
    can't see it on the slide,
  • 21:09 - 21:14
    the website for Student Success
    and Advising is wou.edu/advising.
  • 21:14 - 21:18
    We have academic success advisors
    who are specifically focused on advising
  • 21:18 - 21:23
    exploratory students, and this is a big
    area that we wanna make sure students
  • 21:23 - 21:25
    know it's OK that students don't know
    what they wanna do yet.
  • 21:25 - 21:29
    We'd rather them start the process
    of exploring earlier and be OK with that
  • 21:29 - 21:32
    uncertainty so that they make a good
    decision, then staying in
  • 21:32 - 21:35
    the wrong major too long,
    and then maybe having it effect
  • 21:35 - 21:38
    their GPA because their classes
    didn't go very well,
  • 21:38 - 21:42
    or they get two years into a major
    and realize it's not a good fit.
  • 21:42 - 21:46
    So if any students are just not sure,
    they have questions definitely
  • 21:46 - 21:49
    having that conversation about
    why maybe it's not a good fit,
  • 21:49 - 21:53
    but then if they need to have further
    conversation that's outside the realm
  • 21:53 - 21:56
    of knowledge area and they don't
    have a direct area we welcome
  • 21:56 - 22:00
    them to come see an advisor in office.
  • 22:00 - 22:02
    We can actually change their major
    to "Exploratory" while their exploring
  • 22:02 - 22:05
    so they will have an
    assigned adviser in our office,
  • 22:05 - 22:09
    and we work very closely with various
    resources and opportunities on campus
  • 22:09 - 22:13
    and do training to really help these
    students have opportunities to explore,
  • 22:13 - 22:18
    so there are definitely is an area
    I encourage students to be willing
  • 22:18 - 22:23
    to explore and usually they end up
    doing better if they do that earlier.
  • 22:23 - 22:25
    So if you have any students
    that they're not doing well,
  • 22:25 - 22:28
    it's not a good fit, but they just don't
    really know what they wanna do
  • 22:28 - 22:32
    or what the next step would be,
    that is a great opportunity
  • 22:32 - 22:36
    for us to connect with our office.
  • 22:36 - 22:38
    [Erin]
    However, at some point the students
  • 22:38 - 22:40
    are going to pick a major that's
    a good fit for them,
  • 22:40 - 22:45
    they're gonna stick with that major,
    and they're gonna approach
  • 22:45 - 22:46
    their graduation day.
  • 22:46 - 22:49
    So at that point, again,
    one of the things I wanna make sure
  • 22:49 - 22:54
    I do is I'm double checking that they have
    all of their requirements checked off.
  • 22:54 - 22:57
    One of the things that's really
    nice especially as they get close
  • 22:57 - 23:00
    and we use DegreeTracks is if
    they want to, for example,
  • 23:00 - 23:03
    figure out remaining requirements
    like maybe I have a student
  • 23:03 - 23:10
    who still needs to take their PE 131
    they can check on this box
  • 23:10 - 23:14
    and it'll pop up and it'll tell them
    what the class is and it will give
  • 23:14 - 23:16
    them a historic record of when
    it has been offered.
  • 23:16 - 23:17
    So they're likely to see here,
    "Oh, this class
  • 23:17 - 23:21
    is offered pretty regularly. I shouldn't
    have any trouble picking it up."
  • 23:21 - 23:25
    As opposed to a class that might
    not be offered all that regularly.
  • 23:25 - 23:26
    So that can be really handy.
  • 23:26 - 23:30
    The other thing that's great is that
    the Student Success and Advising Office
  • 23:30 - 23:35
    does provide guides to advising the
    liberal arts core curriculum so students
  • 23:35 - 23:39
    can look at those and see
    what classes they need, as well.
  • 23:39 - 23:42
    As the new general education program
    comes online we will have
  • 23:42 - 23:45
    similar guides to advising
    that particular program.
  • 23:45 - 23:47
    [Nikki]
    And the current guide is included
  • 23:47 - 23:52
    in the handout on our website
    so that's attached with this presentation.
  • 23:53 - 23:55
    [Erin]
    So, but in the meantime as students
  • 23:55 - 23:59
    get closer and closer they're going
    to want to prepare for graduation.
  • 23:59 - 24:04
    And the easiest way to do that
    is to send them back to the university
  • 24:04 - 24:08
    Registrar's Office website and there's
    this fantastic turn-by-turn steps
  • 24:08 - 24:11
    to graduation for undergraduate students.
  • 24:11 - 24:14
    So making sure that they're aware
    that two terms before their graduation
  • 24:14 - 24:18
    term they should be applying to graduate,
    reminding them to always double check
  • 24:18 - 24:21
    with their advisor's to make sure they
    have everything checked off
  • 24:21 - 24:25
    in DegreeTracks all the way up through
    what happens when they graduate.
  • 24:25 - 24:29
    So this is a very handy resource to share
    with students so that they know
  • 24:29 - 24:31
    what they need to be doing.
  • 24:31 - 24:34
    Depending on your program there
    may also be some test requirements.
  • 24:34 - 24:37
    For example, I advise students who
    are often times planning to apply
  • 24:37 - 24:43
    to the Master of Arts and Teaching
    program, and so they have some testing
  • 24:43 - 24:47
    requirements that they need to complete
    prior to application for that program.
  • 24:47 - 24:51
    So making sure that they're aware of all
    those little fun quirks that specific
  • 24:51 - 24:54
    to your academic program
    as they get closer
  • 24:54 - 24:56
    to graduation can be really helpful.
  • 24:58 - 25:02
    [Nikki]
    And kind of on that same note with going
  • 25:02 - 25:07
    with a purpose of the advising appointment
    is that really make sure students
  • 25:07 - 25:10
    are on track for graduation
    and not reaching their last year
  • 25:10 - 25:12
    and realizing that they're
    six credits short,
  • 25:12 - 25:14
    or they're missing a key requirement.
  • 25:14 - 25:18
    So a big portion of the advising
    appointment opportunity is reviewing
  • 25:18 - 25:22
    that DegreeTracks and seeing
    where they're missing areas.
  • 25:22 - 25:25
    But kind of the bigger scope of that
    advising appointment is getting them
  • 25:25 - 25:29
    a connection with campus and helping
    them be connected with resources.
  • 25:29 - 25:35
    The Student Success and Advising Office,
    we work as a resource for all students
  • 25:35 - 25:37
    in a lot of different areas,
    and so as you're meeting with students
  • 25:37 - 25:41
    that maybe they're struggling
    with a particular class,
  • 25:41 - 25:46
    or maybe they are having
    some things going on,
  • 25:46 - 25:48
    just to kind of make you aware
    of some of the other resources
  • 25:48 - 25:51
    that are available through our office,
    but not only that, through campus
  • 25:51 - 25:55
    in the handout that's attached
    to the website with this powerpoint
  • 25:55 - 25:57
    there is a list of common
    resources across campus.
  • 25:57 - 26:00
    Everything from helping students
    get more engaged, like through
  • 26:00 - 26:06
    Service Learning Career Development
    to maybe volunteer or career internships
  • 26:06 - 26:09
    and things like that to you know,
    Student Health and Counseling Center,
  • 26:09 - 26:11
    Office of Disability Services.
  • 26:11 - 26:15
    There's a pretty broad range of resources
    across campus that the advisor can
  • 26:15 - 26:20
    kind of serve as sort of the keychain
    so to speak as connecting those students
  • 26:20 - 26:22
    with those resources they
    may not know exist,
  • 26:22 - 26:25
    or may be hesitant to go
    and explore 'cause they're,
  • 26:25 - 26:28
    they don't know somebody there
    so someone can help make the introduction.
  • 26:28 - 26:33
    Student Success and Advising,
    couple areas that we offer is we do have,
  • 26:33 - 26:40
    we coordinate tutoring for some of
    the main general education opportunities.
  • 26:40 - 26:42
    There is a separate writing center,
    science center,
  • 26:42 - 26:45
    and computer science tutoring,
    as well as math tutoring,
  • 26:45 - 26:49
    so our office with tutoring focuses a lot
    on common general education classes.
  • 26:49 - 26:54
    We also offer a study skills
    tutoring option, so if a student
  • 26:54 - 26:57
    just wants help with time management
    or note-taking but they don't necessarily
  • 26:57 - 27:01
    have a specific class they're struggling
    with they can meet with a tutor for that.
  • 27:01 - 27:04
    They can also always meet with an
    academic success adviser to talk
  • 27:04 - 27:05
    about study skills and that type of thing.
  • 27:05 - 27:08
    We also have some resources
    on our website for students
  • 27:08 - 27:14
    who have any questions about tutoring,
    they can schedule it online through WCS,
  • 27:14 - 27:16
    the Wolf Connection System,
    or they can always just come
  • 27:16 - 27:20
    and contact our office and were located
    in the Advising Center on the south side
  • 27:20 - 27:25
    of the street across from the
    Werner University Center.
  • 27:25 - 27:29
    Another resource with our office
    is as students, and this for faculty
  • 27:29 - 27:32
    may apply also as you're teaching,
    if you have students that
  • 27:32 - 27:34
    you're concerned about,
    they're not showing up to class,
  • 27:34 - 27:38
    or they aren't turning in assignments,
    they aren't doing well on tests,
  • 27:38 - 27:41
    you can create an alert through the
    Wolf Connections System to say,
  • 27:41 - 27:44
    "We're concerned about this student",
    and the academic success advisors
  • 27:44 - 27:47
    in our office will reach out
    and make connections with that student
  • 27:47 - 27:50
    to see what challenges they're facing
    and help them get connected to campus.
  • 27:50 - 27:55
    Basically, whenever we can we're trying
    to give the student as many connections
  • 27:55 - 27:58
    to campus as possible to help them
    with being successful,
  • 27:58 - 28:01
    and the Wolf Connections System
    allows us to maybe know which students
  • 28:01 - 28:04
    to reach out a little bit sooner to try
    to help them overcome any obstacles
  • 28:04 - 28:08
    so that's another area
    that our office works with.
  • 28:08 - 28:12
    And then as I mentioned
    the academic standing, we also do
  • 28:12 - 28:17
    teach a student success class
    so if any students are interested
  • 28:17 - 28:21
    in really in-depth skills for learning
    how to be a better student
  • 28:21 - 28:24
    we teach a class in that area, as well.
  • 28:25 - 28:27
    [Erin]
    So I think one of the things
  • 28:27 - 28:32
    that's important there as I often times
    wrap up an advising session with students
  • 28:32 - 28:36
    is I will also remind them while
    they are required to come
  • 28:36 - 28:40
    and see me during that advising week
    and I have an advising hold
  • 28:40 - 28:45
    that I can use to force them to do
    so they're not limited to that time.
  • 28:45 - 28:49
    They're always welcome to stop back by,
    to send me an email,
  • 28:49 - 28:52
    occasionally during registration,
    for example, a class they thought
  • 28:52 - 28:56
    they wanted to get into will be closed,
    they have a prerequisite error
  • 28:56 - 29:00
    because of that funny little quirk
    in DegreeTracks where a course
  • 29:00 - 29:05
    substitution won't sub out a prereq,
    so those kinds of things
  • 29:05 - 29:09
    occasionally come up after we've
    finished our advising conversation
  • 29:09 - 29:12
    for that term, so I like to make sure
    that they know the they're always
  • 29:12 - 29:14
    welcome to come back and ask questions.
  • 29:14 - 29:17
    And, in fact, they're not bothering me
    when they do that,
  • 29:17 - 29:21
    they're saving us both a lot of time
    and effort because when they self-advise,
  • 29:21 - 29:25
    if they make a mistake
    and something goes wrong,
  • 29:25 - 29:29
    it's a lot more challenging for me
    and for them to go back
  • 29:29 - 29:32
    and take care of that issue,
    whereas if they just ask
  • 29:32 - 29:35
    we can usually figure it out together.
  • 29:35 - 29:37
    [Nikki]
    And a couple other helpful notes
  • 29:37 - 29:42
    with the advising holds that are placed
    on students is that those,
  • 29:42 - 29:45
    that's something that the
    Student Success and Advising Office
  • 29:45 - 29:48
    does facilitate that happens
    the 5th week of every term,
  • 29:48 - 29:53
    a student receives an email with,
    from our office that an advising hold
  • 29:53 - 29:56
    has been placed encouraging them
    to meet with their advisor.
  • 29:56 - 30:02
    And then a couple things to note
    with holds, often times students
  • 30:02 - 30:04
    will have multiple holds
    placed on their account.
  • 30:04 - 30:07
    They might have an advisor
    hold that's cleared by you,
  • 30:07 - 30:09
    but they might also have
    a hold from admissions,
  • 30:09 - 30:12
    or a hold for doing a
    sexual assault training,
  • 30:12 - 30:16
    or something from the business office,
    and so every time I'm meeting
  • 30:16 - 30:21
    with a student I also encourage them
    to look up their holds prior to
  • 30:21 - 30:24
    their registration time and make sure
    they contact the office that
  • 30:24 - 30:26
    placed the hold to get the hold resolved.
  • 30:26 - 30:30
    And often times those holds
    will be placed after the advising hold,
  • 30:30 - 30:33
    and so whenever I'm meeting with
    a student I always make sure to tell them,
  • 30:33 - 30:36
    "Check before you're
    registration time your holds",
  • 30:36 - 30:40
    and students can do that by logging
    into the WolfWeb and they'll be a student
  • 30:40 - 30:43
    and then student records
    and then a "View Holds" option.
  • 30:43 - 30:46
    And even doing that the day before they
    register or the week before
  • 30:46 - 30:49
    so that they're not caught
    off guard and emailing saying,
  • 30:49 - 30:51
    "Why didn't you remove my advisor hold?"
  • 30:51 - 30:54
    And we check and we did but they
    had some other holds placed on there,
  • 30:54 - 30:58
    so that's another thing I like to check
    when I'm meeting with students is to just
  • 30:58 - 31:02
    make them aware that there may be other
    holds and they should've received
  • 31:02 - 31:05
    emails about it, but in
    case they missed that to always check.
  • 31:05 - 31:10
    And then advising, another piece that
    I've seen faculty advisors do is to talk
  • 31:10 - 31:13
    to students about when they will register
    'cause it's assigned based
  • 31:13 - 31:16
    on how many credits,
    but it's broken down into several
  • 31:16 - 31:19
    different time slots based on
    they're day and so students
  • 31:19 - 31:22
    can see their registration
    time also in WolfWeb.
  • 31:22 - 31:25
    They receive an email about that
    so just letting the student to watch
  • 31:25 - 31:30
    for an email about their registration
    time, but also how to go into WolfWeb,
  • 31:30 - 31:33
    click on Student, click on Registration,
    and it will tell them
  • 31:33 - 31:35
    when their time ticket is.
  • 31:35 - 31:39
    So not trying to register the day of,
    that kind of leads into another just
  • 31:39 - 31:43
    with advising it helps students to kind
    of just be aware of important dates
  • 31:43 - 31:47
    and deadlines like maybe when the drop
    deadline is, when the add deadline is,
  • 31:47 - 31:51
    and all of that information can be found
    on the main Western page,
  • 31:51 - 31:53
    but also on the Registrar's Office page.
  • 31:53 - 31:56
    So a lot of advising is just helping
    students be aware of some
  • 31:56 - 31:59
    of those university policies and
    dates and deadlines so that
  • 31:59 - 32:04
    if they have concerns or challenges
    that they're able to take care of those
  • 32:04 - 32:07
    and not be emailing you the day
    after the withdraw deadline saying,
  • 32:07 - 32:10
    "I didn't know that there was a deadline."
  • 32:10 - 32:13
    And so those are just some resources
    to help with making students aware
  • 32:13 - 32:16
    of when you're meeting with them.
  • 32:16 - 32:21
    [Erin]
    So those are sort of the basic things that
  • 32:21 - 32:23
    may come up during an advising session.
  • 32:23 - 32:27
    Every student is different so every
    advising session is different.
  • 32:27 - 32:30
    If you have questions,
    it's always good to talk to
  • 32:30 - 32:33
    the more experienced advisors
    in your department,
  • 32:33 - 32:36
    but just to reiterate the
    Student Success and Advising Office
  • 32:36 - 32:40
    is a wonderful resource that
    can be really, really helpful
  • 32:40 - 32:45
    in getting your students succeeding
    towards graduating as well.
  • 32:46 - 32:48
    [Nikki]
    And I am always welcome to talk
  • 32:48 - 32:51
    with people one on one for strategies
    and we're hoping over time
  • 32:51 - 32:55
    to be able to get more and more
    resources put together to create kind
  • 32:55 - 32:58
    of a resource library for advisors so that
    you don't have to try
  • 32:58 - 33:00
    to remember everything,
    you can refer back to it.
  • 33:00 - 33:04
    I do agree with Erin that if you
    have the opportunity to sit in
  • 33:04 - 33:08
    with a current faculty adviser,
    maybe someone who actually advised
  • 33:08 - 33:11
    some of the students you will be
    seeing to help with that transition,
  • 33:11 - 33:13
    that's a great training opportunity.
  • 33:13 - 33:16
    And just never being afraid to ask
    questions is one thing I've learned
  • 33:16 - 33:19
    with this university is everyone
    is very willing to help.
  • 33:19 - 33:23
    So rather than be unsure, feel free
    to reach out to the Registrar's Office,
  • 33:23 - 33:28
    Financial Aid, any of those areas just
    to try to help the student be bounced
  • 33:28 - 33:33
    around from office to office and get
    the resources from you as their advisor
  • 33:33 - 33:36
    and that there's a lot of
    resources available to help you,
  • 33:36 - 33:40
    so you don't feel like you have to know
    everything that you're not gonna reach
  • 33:40 - 33:43
    out to if you have questions.
  • 33:43 - 33:47
    If you have any suggestions for further
    training that you would like to see,
  • 33:47 - 33:50
    or discussions you would like to have
    as advising that is something
  • 33:50 - 33:55
    I would like to hear, so feel free
    to email me, my email is Weight,
  • 33:55 - 34:00
    W-E-I-G-H-T-N@wou.edu, or feel free
    to come see me in the advising center.
  • 34:00 - 34:02
    [Erin]
    And we wish you good success
  • 34:02 - 34:05
    with advising!
Title:
advising
Video Language:
English
Duration:
34:05
odscaptioning edited English subtitles for advising
odscaptioning edited English subtitles for advising
odscaptioning edited English subtitles for advising
odscaptioning edited English subtitles for advising
odscaptioning edited English subtitles for advising
odscaptioning edited English subtitles for advising
odscaptioning edited English subtitles for advising
odscaptioning edited English subtitles for advising
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