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Kate Shepard must be turning in her grave

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    rc3 prerol sound
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    Herald: Oh, oh, this is Whabl. I will
    start with an English introduction and
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    followed up with the German one. Welcome
    to the "Kate Sheppad turning in her
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    grave"- talk here at the Haecksen Stream
    during the next 20 minutes. The mother,
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    musician and geek catalyst will take we
    talk about sexism in the professional and
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    personal life in the 21st century. During
    the talks, she will mentioned violence and
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    pornography, but without any expert
    images. After the talk, you can join us in
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    the Q&A, which is hosted on the Big Blue
    button. Herzlich Willkommen zum nächsten
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    Talk "Kate Shepard must be turning in her
    grave". In den nächsten 20 Minuten die
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    Mutter, Musikerin und Katalyst wird über
    Sexism im professionellen und persönlichem
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    Leben, Gewalt, Pornographie sprechen im
    21. Jahrhundert. Während des Talks wird
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    Gewalt und Pornografie erwähnt, ohne
    expliziten Bildern. Nach dem Talk seid ihr
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    herrzlich eingeladen zu Q&A der Haecksen
    zu BigBlueButton zu kommen. Viel Spaß!
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    Eine Frau Spricht. Kate Shepard must be
    turning in her grave. aNixon, sponsoring
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    incidents in which our music isn't on our
    list was sexist, Muslim, 5.10, wolfish
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    Mumford does. I don't want to see one
    that's even just talk, said Gabbidon.
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    Pornography, having skipped over a kind of
    explicit bidder. That's him. Talk. Angela
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    Consumption and Hexham Big Two weapons
    Pierce Parsons. Kate Sheppard would be
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    turning in her grave. This is the
    presentation by me. In October of this
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    year at the ripe age of forty four, I
    started to study IT. I am going to become
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    a Fachinformatikerin, specializing in
    system administration or, as the Germans
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    call it, physi. It's a big deal for me
    because I haven't got any completed
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    qualifications yet exit from my university
    entrance. I was ineligible to become a
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    baker, but I'm really glad that I took a
    leap and started learning IT instead. I
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    was privileged enough to get a
    Bildungsgutschein. I had to go to
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    Amazon.com over the summer and do German
    and math and logic tests, which were good
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    enough to convince that I can tour to let
    me do the course. And because of corona,
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    it's entirely online. I don't even have to
    leave the house to get an education. It's
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    just perfect right now. I feel so
    privileged. First of all, to be able to
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    retrain as an older student as it is. But
    secondly, I don't have to go out into the
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    world every day in the middle of a
    pandemic. It's perfect! So I had zero
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    strategy or even a proper strong will
    about learning when I was 18 and went to
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    university during my uncompleted music
    studies. I took a 101 introduction to
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    computer science, but it was clear after
    the first two lectures that I should have
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    taken the one or two instead, which was
    the basic course for the actual degree
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    path. I was this close. But although we
    were shown the basic hardware after that,
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    this is five months of Microsoft Office,
    sadly. And by the time I realized I was
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    two behind on the material to be able to
    switch to the other course, but I always
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    had an interest in computers. The first
    from figuring out how I could use my dad's
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    old work dos work computer as a word
    processor, copying basic programs out of a
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    book onto a C64, or nervously trying out
    the single Apple computer at the tiny two
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    classroom country school I went to. I come
    from New Zealand, which is famous for
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    being actually paradise. I get asked about
    once a week. What are you doing here?
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    These days, I like to answer. I really
    like corona. Yeah, that's not a lot going
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    on in New Zealand, though, is a bit too
    finite for my personal tastes. I did this
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    weird mess when I left, which was based
    upon increasing the amount of possible
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    things that could happen to me. I mean,
    how could I resist? But the challenges of
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    concentrated, detailed learning and my
    middle age, I feel it's necessary and very
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    helpful to call on some girl bosses and
    strong role models. I have a very daunting
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    mission ahead of me, and I don't have time
    for doubt or distraction, especially with
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    its five year old kid to care for as well.
    Will tell me that I look fat at the drop
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    of a hat. There are some amazing women who
    have come out of New Zealand, for example,
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    on the left, you have Jane Batten, who
    made long-distance solo airplane journeys.
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    And on the right, this incredible woman as
    Nancy White, who was a New Zealander, a
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    nurse and a journalist who went joined the
    French Foreign Legion in World War Two.
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    She got the codename the White Mouse, and
    she once killed an SS officer with her
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    bare hands. She had a five million franc
    price on her head and was the most
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    decorated allied woman of World War Two.
    And this is Kate shippers who wasn't
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    actually born in New Zealand, she was born
    in the UK, but her work is credited with
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    being the catalyst for New Zealand being
    the first country on the entire planet to
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    give women the vote in 1893, who work also
    had a profound influence on other
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    countries, also making this improvement.
    Here she is featured currently on New
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    Zealand's $10 bill and this is my great
    great grandmother, Jemima. Born in New
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    Zealand in 1860, and she was one of the
    first woman in the world who was able to
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    vote. There's another hero who appeared
    like a headmistress, the kind of angel to
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    me and my youth. Helen Clark delivered a
    fiery speech at my school final assembly.
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    She was the second ever serving prime
    minister of New Zealand, but the first one
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    who is actually a less elected to the post
    and the first one who is actually nice. At
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    the time she spoke at my school, she'd
    already been deputy prime minister for a
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    few years and would go on later very soon
    to become New Zealand's first elected
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    female prime minister. Helen recently only
    narrowly missed out on becoming secretary
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    general of the United Nations. Yeah,
    Jacinta gets a lot of credit, but yeah,
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    Helen was there before. She told us in the
    speech that most of us would end up going
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    overseas and that when we did that, we
    should be the best possible ambassadors
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    for our little country that we could
    possibly be. A friend of mine told me
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    snappily several years later that in fact,
    we should be telling the world that New
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    Zealand is full of drug addicts and
    prostitutes so that people stop going
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    there for the holidays all the time. So
    it's actually rife with homelessness,
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    crime and meth. So maybe go check out
    Australia instead. But her speech and
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    still a curiosity and me and I thought,
    Well, I want to be one of the ones that
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    goes. So coming alone from this more
    experimental nation in 2000, the birth of
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    the 20th century. As far as my feet can
    take me to the airport, to the beast that
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    is Europe, I was ready for my eyes and all
    of my senses to be open wide to this
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    incredible continent. That was a source of
    philosophy and ideas and science and
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    developments. But it seems to be a bit
    preoccupied with itself trying to decide
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    if people with darker skin were actually
    humans as well, let alone the fact that
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    you can't get a decent coffee until about
    10 a.m. in the morning, which is worth.
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    Which is worth a 20 minute talk in itself.
    There's definitely some issues that come
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    from being a cumbersome burdens dinosaur
    of a nation. 20 years later and somehow we
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    have a universe with fax machine, fax
    machines and toxic Telegram groups exist
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    at the same point in time. It's certainly
    a sharp contrast to the tiny, fast moving,
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    tricky, isolated remote little island in
    the South Pacific that I herald from. So
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    as I mentioned, New Zealand owes status as
    the first country to give women the vote
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    and a great part to the work of the
    suffragette Kate Sheppard. And I think
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    that had a lot to do with the fact that it
    was a small country with a tiny
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    population, and that's just simply makes
    it easier to change things. It was also
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    fueled heavily by the wishes of woman's
    prohibit alcohol, which invariably comes
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    with violence, which is rife in a colony
    of much less penetrant social pressures,
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    much more isolation and dodgy home brew
    than in their homelands. You didn't have
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    to convince and convert so many people in
    New Zealand as you had to in Germany. And
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    in addition to that, you also didn't have
    to change so many laws because there
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    weren't that many laws. Germany always
    feels to me like this big, friendly but
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    cumbersome bureaucratic dinosaur. But in
    the late eighteen hundreds in New Zealand,
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    white people only been there for about 50
    years. So I think this enables the whole
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    process to be streamlined. Opponents
    labeled the movement as a leap in the
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    dark, but in reality it was a giant leap
    into the light. Germany wasn't that far
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    behind at this stage. Women had the vote
    here by 1919 and directly at the same
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    time. Women were also able to be elected
    to office, which is fantastic. And
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    obviously some things happened after that,
    which slowed the whole thing down a bit.
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    But something I keep hearing again since
    I've been living in this country is, oh
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    yeah. But in the 70s, it was still the law
    here that women weren't allowed to have
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    their own bank accounts without their
    husbands signing off on it. So look how
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    well we've done considering there, but
    this feels to me like an excuse. This is
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    50 years ago now, and there's been plenty
    of time to accelerate this stuff, to kick
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    up some kind of quantum feminism to make
    up for lost cars. If only Germany put as
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    much energy into equality as it did and to
    building car engines. So despite these
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    excuses, despite hearing repeatedly from
    friends of mine who were living more
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    mainstream lives than me, that this glass
    ceiling is dare to be put out by us from
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    underneath so that mostly men can look
    down through it with a nice, clear view.
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    Regardless of knowing all of this in my
    brain, I was still pretty shocked when I
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    started studying IT in 2021 to find out
    whether I was on a course with only one
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    other woman and with twenty five guys,
    especially them with an almost too long in
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    particular that there will be a higher
    percentage of woman. It would be really
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    nice if Germany could speed it up just a
    little bit and the equality area, because
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    this is a field where a lot more women
    should be and it's so interesting, so
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    broad. When you look at on paper, there is
    no reason why it should be a male
  • 10:50 - 10:55
    dominated industry. It's not a physically
    demanding job, and the fact that you can
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    work from home makes it perfect. For
    example, single parents, women with
  • 11:00 - 11:06
    younger children who want to be home when
    they expect from school, like I do. I just
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    think there's so much more potential than
    just being a digital sausage fest. I
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    really think this country has got enough
    sausages. I do also realize that I can
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    only see this from my particular
    perspective, for my particular experiences
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    and my individual blundering romp through
    this world and probably the IT profession
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    in New Zealand is just as behind. No
    shade, everyone. But I'm just wondering
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    how come it's not better than it is? I
    keep getting told how brave I am for doing
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    this, which feels infuriating. It doesn't
    feel like it should be brave. It feels
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    like it should be really normal to do what
    I'm doing, but instead a sincere take a
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    big heaving pair of virtual balls to drive
    dove into an industry that women have been
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    successful in since the beginning. I'm
    pretty much starting from scratch and it's
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    overwhelming and it's so much. I've worked
    a office job for about 40 hours a week,
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    learning from home on Zoom the entire
    time. Something quite different. So I will
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    see how this progresses, and I just relish
    the determination that I feel at the
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    moment, and I hope that I can sustain it
    for the next 19 months. And I mean, I'm
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    late to the party no matter what happens.
    But hey, season three of last. Some of the
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    best characters hadn't even shown up yet.
    So for now, I'm trying to study every day,
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    at least a little bit after class and in
    the weekends, and I'm sure so short,
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    overwhelmed with so much information right
    now that I hope that as long as I
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    consistently keep putting more time than
    I'm required to, I'll be OK. Regardless of
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    how much English there is in IT, it is
    still a massive challenge to study in a
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    foreign language. I try and Ubertreibe
    das. Just a little bit all the time and
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    read another few pages, look at a few
    YouTube videos or listen to a podcast. It
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    is complicated somewhat by the fact that
    the proofing system has just been
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    dramatically overhauled by the car instead
    of a MultiChoice exam for this
  • 13:13 - 13:17
    zwischenprüfung. Apparently, it's now more
    similar to how the end exams used to be,
  • 13:17 - 13:22
    and nobody has even set a final exam in
    this new structure yet. It's pretty
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    terrifying. Our tests in between seem to
    be creepily easy considering what is
  • 13:28 - 13:33
    coming. But all I do, I just figure in my
    situation, my job didn't fire what I need
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    to know. And if I can do that, I'm halfway
    there. I feel like I'm collecting
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    knowledge on a big scale and I know there
    is more to come. So I'm trying to get the
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    basics down as firmly as I can, which
    includes figuring out a way to be clear
  • 13:49 - 13:57
    and the stingless universe that I mean
    villain or faulen. Am I talking Denglish
  • 13:57 - 14:05
    or am I talking, gentlemen? So Phil, I
    just confuses me constantly because I
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    don't don't even know what I'm supposed to
    be saying. But a classmate of mine made a
  • 14:09 - 14:14
    good call to sign it and then on an
    abbreviated form every time to avoid
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    confusion. So I'm just going to go with
    that. So I've dropped a few of my habits
  • 14:19 - 14:24
    to make space to study. I don't play drums
    as much as I was before. I stopped writing
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    songs for now, but I've started jogging in
    the mornings and I still play bass guitar
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    in a punk band in Nepal on the weekends.
    But corona is just the best time to be
  • 14:34 - 14:39
    studying because I'm missing out on
    nothing. I can stay home most of the
  • 14:39 - 14:44
    weekend and just alternate cleaning and
    cooking and learning all the time. My
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    mental health is also a huge priority for
    me, especially with COVID staying
  • 14:48 - 14:53
    positive. And when these little nagging
    thoughts come up, just be like, I don't
  • 14:53 - 14:57
    have time for this now. Maybe another
    time, but it's the little things that make
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    the difference in the end, and my body's
    just as important as my mind. I need to
  • 15:02 - 15:06
    stay primed for exponential knowledge and
    take and to not take the teenager's bad
  • 15:06 - 15:13
    moods personally. I want to say a little
    something about social media because it
  • 15:13 - 15:18
    has been on my mind. I don't like being
    confronted with any sexual content when
  • 15:18 - 15:22
    I'm trying to learn. I don't want to see
    it jiggling bottom when I'm trying to
  • 15:22 - 15:28
    digest my abendbrot. But it's jarring just
    because of its appropriateness, let alone
  • 15:28 - 15:33
    the content itself. There was some really
    dodgy stuff in a WhatsApp group. I wanted
  • 15:33 - 15:39
    to say something, but it's really not easy
    to do. I sort of thought about it and
  • 15:39 - 15:44
    almost decided to just leave the group
    rather than to mention it. I was really
  • 15:44 - 15:52
    grateful when somebody said something
    about it. Shout out Fan 2021, your jam.
  • 15:52 - 16:00
    And since then, it's been noticeably a lot
    better. But so here and there, some on the
  • 16:00 - 16:05
    border stuff gets shared. I mean, my
    social media contact with the people in my
  • 16:05 - 16:11
    class is to further my knowledge, to and
    unterstützt my learning process not to
  • 16:11 - 16:15
    look at bums. I do not want to be
    confronted with reproductive biology when
  • 16:15 - 16:20
    I'm just checking the time. Maybe, maybe I
    should start posting a recipe every time
  • 16:20 - 16:27
    somebody posted something. Or maybe like I
    should say something about every single
  • 16:27 - 16:34
    time I should write. But it's so hard. I
    don't want to be the one coming in and
  • 16:34 - 16:40
    saying, blah blah blah. I don't care. I'm
    not only a woman, I'm also old, so I'm
  • 16:40 - 16:46
    really trying to not send off this grandma
    vibes. I don't want to be the camp mother.
  • 16:46 - 16:50
    I want to be right there in the thick of
    the scrum. I've got a thick skin, and I
  • 16:50 - 16:55
    realize that not every woman is confident
    enough to travel the world with no money
  • 16:55 - 16:59
    to make bands and found clubs and
    magazines that survive a divorce without
  • 16:59 - 17:05
    getting a single tattoo. Some major
    achievement, by the way, so I see it as a
  • 17:05 - 17:09
    moral responsibility to see this through
    to get this qualification, even if it
  • 17:09 - 17:15
    doesn't inspire a single other person,
    possibly my 12 year old. But that kind of
  • 17:15 - 17:19
    just depends on the way that the wind is
    blowing, and the irony of doing all of
  • 17:19 - 17:25
    this out of my kitchen has not escaped me.
    Maybe I can change a few perspectives in
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    the process. I am here and very loud. I'm
    going to ask all the questions and I'm
  • 17:33 - 17:38
    going, Stay to the end. I need to achieve
    this because of the woman before me who
  • 17:38 - 17:46
    sacrificed so much. It's ridiculous that I
    wasn't born onto an even playing field in
  • 17:46 - 17:53
    the 1970s, but I'm jumping every day as
    hard as I possibly can. These trailblazers
  • 17:53 - 17:56
    who busted their asses to get us the right
    to be able to vote democratically will be
  • 17:56 - 18:02
    shaking their heads. I think about Kate
    Sheppard and try and leap into the light
  • 18:02 - 18:06
    on every possible occasion. I want to show
    my kid that you can do anything when you
  • 18:06 - 18:11
    really want to. But first, I need to get
    this network stuff down. I woke up half
  • 18:11 - 18:16
    dreaming about protocol abbreviations last
    weekend, so I think I'm on the right
  • 18:16 - 18:24
    track. If you want to follow me on
    Twitter, my name is @diebestimmerin. I
  • 18:24 - 18:28
    can't believe that it wasn't taken but
    wasn't taken a few years ago when I
  • 18:28 - 18:36
    grabbed it, when Twitter wasn't as popular
    as it is now. So I post a lot of sarcastic
  • 18:36 - 18:42
    remarks about learning IT sang at home
    during corona. And as you can see, some of
  • 18:42 - 18:49
    the mind bending, dangling atrocities that
    I happened to come across. That's it for
  • 18:49 - 18:55
    me today. I want to give a shout out to my
    wonderful classmates who are watching.
  • 18:55 - 18:59
    Thank you for your support. You're great.
    And thanks everybody for sticking around.
  • 18:59 - 19:03
    Let me know if you have any questions.
    Cheers.
  • 19:03 - 19:08
    Herald: But then you do for the great
    talk. Is this comes less? Let's discuss
  • 19:08 - 19:12
    some further points and join us for the
    Q&A. It will be held in the awesome Ada
  • 19:12 - 19:20
    room at its. Zipes says this event stopped
    Hexham dot org slash awesome underscore
  • 19:20 - 19:22
    Ada dot HMO.
  • 19:22 - 19:23
    Subtitles created by c3subtitles.de
    in the year 2022. Join, and help us!
Title:
Kate Shepard must be turning in her grave
Description:

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Video Language:
English
Duration:
19:47

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