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Edward Hopper and Cinema: A Great Art Explained Extra

  • 0:07 - 0:10
    The film director Cecil B. DeMille's
    early silent films
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    had a dark, moody quality
    that was characterized
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    by the director as "Rembrand lighting".
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    Movies have been inspired by fine art
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    from the very beginning
    of the cinema industry,
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    sometimes in the form of a sequence,
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    sometimes in the art direction
    or the position of the actors,
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    or sometimes in the "feel" of a movie.
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    For some films, the homage is obvious,
    in others more enigmatic.
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    Many filmmakers and art directors
    take direct inspiration from artists
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    to inform their own creative vision,
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    often referencing scenes
    that are already familiar to us
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    in specific works of art.
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    As the French new wave director
    Jean-Luc Goddard said:
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    "It's not where you take things from
    it's where you take them to."
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    Edward Hopper is seen as one
    of the first 20th century artist
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    to be influenced by the cinema.
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    He was an artist, more than any other,
    who loved cinema — and cinema loved him.
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    They both looked to each other
    for stylistic interpretation
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    and both created worlds
    of extraordinary imagination.
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    As Hopper's work became more well-known
    over the years to the general public
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    filmmakers made more self-conscious
    references to his paintings.
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    This exerimental film by Gustav Deutsch
    uses 13 beautifully recreated paintings
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    by Hopper to tell the story of a woman
    spanning three decades.
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    In 2020 Wim Wenders released
    this "love letter" to Edward Hopper.
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    "In front of Edward Hopper's paintings
    I always get this feeling
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    "that they are frames from movies
    that were never made,
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    and I start wondering:
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    "What's the story that is beginning here?
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    "What will happen to these
    characters in the next moment?"
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    Edward Hopper was 13 years old
    when the first motion pictures were shown.
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    He was in his late forties
    when talking pictures came,
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    and he died just as Bonnie and Clyde
    was being released.
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    You could say his life
    was tied to cinematic history.
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    His work was inspired
    not just by his movie obsession,
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    but by the very act
    of going to the cinema,
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    and we see this in this early etching
    depicting two isolated figures
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    looking down on an unseen screen.
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    We see cinemas in his other paintings,
    as well of course with his masterpiece:
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    "New York Movie".
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    Filmmakers would hook on
    to Hopper's creations
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    — and return the compliments
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    by turning to him
    for stylistic inspiration.
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    German Expressionism was one
    of his early influences.
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    Films he saw in Paris at the turn
    of the 20th century
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    — and the high angle images
    he produced around this period,
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    would later be replicated
    by a new avant-garde generation.
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    His career would really take off
    during the great depression of the 1930s,
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    and the films of that period
    — and his paintings —
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    reflected the dark pessimism at the time,
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    a time of great insecurity.
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    World War II brings another period
    of uncertainty
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    and gives birth to Film Noir.
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    Woman: "I can't stand it anymore
    what if they do hang me?"
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    These dark films would look
    for inspiration
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    directly from Hopper's paintings
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    who was himself looking
    for inspiration in the movies.
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    It was these films shot in Hollywood
    in the 1930s and 40s
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    which Hopper really loved.
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    Films with a voyeuristic edge,
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    set in an unnamed city,
    an ambiguous setting.
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    Films whose aesthetics were themselves
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    derived from German Expressionism.
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    Like Hopper, these films
    use dark shadows and stark lightinga
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    to create an extreme contrast
    between light and dark.
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    But with classic Film Noir
    it is not just "style",
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    it is all about the tone,
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    as it is with Hopper's paintings.
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    Both take a familiar narrative element,
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    and apply layer after layer
    of possible meaning.
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    ambiguous relationships, sexual tension,
    a cynical eye
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    and underlying existential philosophy,
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    were all features we see
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    in both Hopper's paintings
    and cinema of this period.
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    Woman; "Accident insurance?"
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    In common with Film Noir,
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    the subject Hopper
    returned to again and again
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    was the hardened and stony-faced
    female protagonist.
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    As I discussed in my main film on Hopper,
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    he had a disastrous love life
    and unhappy marriage
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    and he often used women
    as a vehicle to channel his unhappiness.
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    It is in this early watercolour
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    that we first see the unhappy
    and discontented female lead.
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    In this painting she is the wife
    being ignored by her husband.
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    Here, a defeated woman
    contemplates her lot in life.
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    And here, a sullen-faced girlfriend
    ignores her partner.
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    It is in "Nighthawks" that we see
    her as a classic Femme Fatale.
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    I sometimes feel
    as if all of Hopper's women
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    are ready to walk off frame
    and commit a misdemeanor.
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    Woman: "If you don't mind".
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    (Gunshot)
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    Alfred Hitchcock, no stranger
    to the icy female lead,
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    spoke openly of Hopper's influence
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    and we see evidence throughout
    Hitchcock's films.
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    They are very much alike
    in their love of suspense and ambiguity,
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    and in their interest in themes
    of voyeurism, loneliness and isolation.
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    Not to mention... windows.
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    "This is the scene of the crime.
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    "A crime of passion, filmed in a way
    you have never seen before."
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    Like Hitchcock, it is
    what Hopper chose to exclude
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    in his paintings which adds tension.
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    The narrative power lies in what
    is obscured or unseen.
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    One of Hopper's images directly
    influenced Hitchcock.
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    But it was a big influence
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    on so many other films,
    and even illustrations of the day.
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    Hitchcock: "An old house...
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    "which is ..., if I may say so,
    a little more sinister looking,
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    "less innocent than the motel itself."
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    We saw in the longer film
    how Hopper's "Nighthawks"
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    was inspired by a book by Hemingway
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    and how the subsequent film version
    was then inspired by "Nighthawks".
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    A great example of this symbiotic
    and mutually beneficial relationship
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    can be found in an obscure
    and rarely film
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    released two years before
    he completed "Nighthawks".
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    I think, looking at details such as
    the corner setting,
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    the position of the sidewalk,
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    and even a soda jerk
    wearing a similar cap,
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    this may have been one of the main
    inspirations for Hopper's diner.
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    An entire generation of film directors
    would be influenced by Hopper,
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    and that aesthetic would be
    instantly recognizable
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    as a certain type of "American landscape"`
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    not just aesthetically,
    but in terms of mood.
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    ["All the paintings of Edward Hopper
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    [could be taken from
    one long movie about America,
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    [each one, the beginning of a new scene."
    — Wim Wenders]
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    David Lynch, another American fan,
    would also reference
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    many of Hopper's paintings in his films.
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    ["I like many painters,
    but I love Francis Bacon the most,
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    [and Edward Hopper" — David Lynch]
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    Lynch, like Hopper, peeled back the facade
    of the perfect American life
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    to expose sinister "goings-on".
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    And in the third season of Twin Peaks
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    he used the painter's references
    quite liberally.
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    Hopper's vision of American life,
    has had a huge impact
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    on how the rest of the world pictures
    the United States.
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    It is a world that today
    we still call "Hopper-esque".
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    He is what we think of
    as a quintessential American artist,
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    yet he was also a major influence
    on so many non-American filmmakers,
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    who saw an intensity in Hopper,
    a sense of emptiness,
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    and a lack of communication
    that we can all understand.
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    Many of the filmmakers
    have their own fascination
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    with the American dream
    — and the dark side behind it.
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    They recognize the themes
    of disconnection.
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    They see that the psychology
    behind a Hopper painting
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    can be translated into any culture
    and any language,
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    and they made Hopper one of their own.
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    Michelangelo Antonioni said: "The theme
    of most of my films is loneliness"
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    and his films typically
    featured bored lovers,
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    whose lives are blighted by quiet despair
    and existential unhappiness.
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    He professed to being stylistically
    inspired by Hopper
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    (as well as Giorgio de Chirico).
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    Roy Andersson's films
    are instantly recognizable
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    for their stylized presentation
    and painterly approach,
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    and the director, whose films show
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    the alienation and solitude
    of modern life,
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    cites Hopper as a major influence.
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    Like Hopper's paintings,
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    Andersson carefully stages
    every single frame.
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    His sets are elaborately built
    over several months,
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    and his films sometimes
    take four years to make!
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    Andersson's themes — like Hopper's —
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    often leave it up to the viewer
    to guess what is happening
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    outside the picture frame.
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    We complete the picture.
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    The diner in "Nighthawks",
    his most iconic image,
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    and possibly his most cinematic,
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    has been recreated time and again
    in the cinema.
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    The diner has become a short cut
    to "emotional dysfunction".
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    Woman: "I know I can't rely
    on you, Arthur.
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    "Not for anything."
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    Man: "There's a lot of bad boys
    out there.
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    Woman: "I know."
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    Woman: "But I got eyes
    in the back of my head."
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    (Gunshot)
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    Director: "Cut!"
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    Filmmakers continue to be inspired
    by Edward Hopper
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    whose works still resonate
    in the 21st century.
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    And his influence is felt even
    in a new generation of K-pop stars.
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    Edward Hopper, the biggest fan of cinema,
    would have been astonished
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    to know his influence would still be felt
    by so many young filmmakers
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    and even Korean pop stars, decades
    after he created his images.
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    But who knows?
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    Maybe in another life, he would have
    been directing films himself.
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    Director: "Cut!"
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    Edward Hopper: "Could that be?"
  • 11:51 - 11:53
    Woman: "Is there a cue when I enter?"
Title:
Edward Hopper and Cinema: A Great Art Explained Extra
Description:

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This occassional Great Art Explained ‘Extras’ series are films designed to complement my main series. Stories that interested me during my research that I wanted to expand on.

Movies have been inspired by fine art from the very beginning of the cinema industry.

Edward hopper was 13 years old when the first motion pictures were shown - he was in his late 40s when talking pictures came, and he died just as Bonnie and Clyde was being released. You could say his life was tied to cinematic history.

Hopper is seen as one of the first 20th-century artists to be influenced by the cinema. He was an artist - more than any other - who loved cinema - and cinema loved him.

Subscribe and click the bell icon to be notified! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePD...

I would like to thank all my Patreon supporters, in particular Alan Stewart, Alexander Velser, Christa Sawyer, Griffin Evans, Jennifer Barnaby, Julio Cardenas, Karim Hopper, Nicholas Siebenlist, Paul Ark, Pawel Juszczyk, Theresa Garfink, Toni Ko, Tyler Wittreich, and Will Dewees-Power

"What a brilliant series this is" - Stephen Fry on Twitter 12 December 2020

CREDITS

SUBTITLES I input the English subtitles myself but I rely on volunteers to do subtitles for other languages and I really appreciate it - just contact me at jamespayne33@hotmail.com
French subtitles by Ludivine Desriac

Title Sequence by Brian Adsit (instagram https://instagram.com/brian_vfx?utm_m... and Behance www.behance.com/badsit88)

All the videos, songs, images, and graphics used in the video belong to their respective owners and I or this channel do not claim any right over them.

Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

FILM CLIPS (In order – director credit and date in video)
Male and Female © Paramount Pictures
The President © Fotorama
Metropolis © Paramount Pictures
Cabaret © 20th Century Studios
Dreams © Warner Brothers
M*A*S*H © 20th Century Studios
The Watchmen © HBO Studios
Marie Antoinette © Columbia Pictures
Clockwork Orange © Warner Brothers
The Scream © Paramount Pictures
Shutter Island © Paramount Pictures
The Shining © Warner Brothers
Revenge of the Sith © 20th Century Studios
E.T. © Universal Pictures
Scarlet Street © Universal Pictures
Psycho © Paramount Pictures
Shirley: Visions of Reality © Sixpack Film
Two or Three Things I Know About Edward Hopper © Wim Wenders
Arrival of a Train © Société Lumière
The Jazz Singer © Warner Brothers
Bonnie and Clyde © Warner Brothers
Force of Evil © Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
The Naked City © Universal Pictures
Manhattan © United Artists
Student of Prague © Letterboxd
Cabinet of Dr Caligari © Decla Films
Zabriskie Point © Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Modern Times © United Artists
Double Indemnity © Paramount Pictures
Mildred Pierce © Warner Brothers
Maltese Falcon © Warner Brothers
Kiss me Deadly © United Artists
The Birds © Universal Pictures
North by Northwest © Universal Pictures
Vertigo © Universal Pictures
Rear Window © Paramount Pictures
Giant © Warner Brothers
Days of Heaven © Paramount Pictures
The Addams Family © ABC Television
The Killers © Universal Pictures
Stranger on the Third Floor © RKO Pictures
Paris, Texas © 20th Century Studios
Mystery Train © Orion Classics
Blue Velvet © Paramount Pictures
Twin Peaks: The Return © Showtime
Brief Encounter © Universal Pictures
Deep Red © Cineriz
Road to Perdition © 20th Century Studios
Point Bank © Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Songs From the Second Floor © Roy Andersson
Blade Runner © Warner Brothers
Fear Eats the Soul © Tango-Film
The Human Voice © Sony Picture Classics
L’Avventura © Janus Films
La Notte © Janus Films
The Eclipse © Janus Films
A Pigeon Sat on a Branch… © Roy Andersson
Songs from the Second Floor © Roy Andersson
Pennies from Heaven © Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
The End of Violence © Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
The Batman © Warner Brothers
Carol © Studio Canal
Happen © Heize

MUSIC

Night on the Docks - Sax by Kevin MacLeod https://incompetech.com/ Promoted by MrSnooze https://youtu.be/iYOvAO1rAM0 License: CC BY 3.0 https://goo.gl/Yibru5

Song: Villainous Treachery Artist: Kevin MacLeod Genero: Silent Film

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Video Language:
English
Duration:
12:14

English subtitles

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