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cdn.media.ccc.de/.../wikidatacon2019-7-eng-Education_panel_hd.mp4

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    (Shani) Good morning, everyone,
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    and welcome to the Wikidata
    and Education panel.
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    We're just happy anyone is here
    because there are four amazing sessions
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    happening all at the same time
    so thank you for showing up.
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    - (audience 1) We're happy you're here.
    - (Shani) Yes, we are also happy and we--
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    Yes, yes, yes.
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    I mean, really all the sessions
    are really good
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    so this is for the people at home,
    if you're watching something else,
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    please come watch us later or vice versa
    because there's a lot of awesomeness
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    in this conference.
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    So good morning again
    and just to be clear
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    on what to expect from this session,
    we're going to have
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    a really quick introduction
    of these amazing people
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    that are assembled here today.
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    We're going to do an introduction
    of around three minutes each,
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    and then we're simply
    going to have a chat.
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    We're going to discuss education
    and Wikidata
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    and what could be done together
    and hopefully we can then
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    open the floor to questions
    but do feel free to basically interrupt us
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    if you have something burning
    and you really want to know
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    the answer to.
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    So without further ado,
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    let's meet our panelists.
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    And the first is João.
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    (João) So, hi, everyone.
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    Is it working?
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    Yup, okay, so my name is João Peschanski,
    username Joaolpe.
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    I'm a member of the user group,
    Wiki Movimento Brasil
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    and the user group,
    Wikipedia and Education.
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    And I'm a university professor,
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    particularly in the Department
    of Social Communications
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    where I teach Computational
    Journalism Media studies.
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    - And I have two slides, I'm not sure--
    - (Shani) Tell me when to switch.
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    Okay, yeah, you can switch.
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    So I will just mention two projects
    that to some extent,
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    give a background of what I'm--
    what my understanding of the connection
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    of Wikidata and educations are.
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    So the first project is the idea
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    of using Wikidata as an instrument
    for Wikipedia, both and mostly to create
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    more meaningfulness and efficiency
    in the process of working with my students
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    so this was a project done twice.
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    In which my students created
    true structure narratives
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    based on Wikidata, entries
    for Wikipedia in Portuguese on elections.
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    There were around 400 entries created
    and the idea is to have my students
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    not feel the idea that editing Wikipedia,
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    particularly tables, is boring.
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    So it provides a gigantic structured draft
    based on Wikidata.
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    So it provides more efficiency
    and effectiveness for the students.
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    If you could go to the second one.
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    And we can talk later if you're interested
    I provide a lot of links.
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    And so the second case
    is one that I'm running right now.
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    So in Brazil, there were four
    distinct investigations
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    of human rights crimes committed
    during the military dictatorship,
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    two by the government,
    one by intellectuals,
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    one by family members of killed
    and disappeared people in Brazil.
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    And as they were completely autonomous
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    and diverse, data that
    they collected was conflicting.
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    So we are using Wikidata
    as a way of dealing
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    with conflicted information,
    disagreeing data, knowledge diversity.
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    And having my students work
    as curators of the information,
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    in which we don't impose one
    over the other but we try to understand
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    the context and methodology
    of the information that was created
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    and there is, of course, actual results
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    and there is a dashboard you can check,
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    but I would just point on this one,
    a recent Wikidata live training
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    that we had with Denny Vrandecic
    on disagreeing data
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    and knowledge diversity
    that has actually informed the way
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    we are working the methodology
    around this particular project.
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    - And I thank you.
    - (Shani) Thank you so much.
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    Next is Ewan.
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    (Ewan) Yes, so, hi, my name is Ewan.
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    I work as the Wikimedian in Residence
    at the University of Edinburgh.
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    It's a partnership between Wikimedia UK
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    and the University of Edinburgh
    looking at ways
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    in which we can benefit from
    and contribute to the Wikimedia projects.
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    We're working with about ten
    different course programs at the moment.
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    And we're on the verge of publishing
    our first booklet of case studies
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    of how Wikimedia is being used
    in education in the U.K.
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    In particular, we've been working with
    Data Science for Design Masters students
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    for about three years now.
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    And the course leaders on that course
    approached myself
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    after me and Navina Evans, who's behind
    Histropedia, around a workshop
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    at Repository Fringe conference
    focused on Wikidata,
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    and they were really interested
    in teaching data science
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    through working with real world data sets.
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    And so what they do is
    they host a data fair
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    every year in October where people
    from around Edinburgh,
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    around Scotland, different institutions
    come and pitch a data set
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    to the students
    on the Masters program there
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    to work with intensively over
    a seven-week period.
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    It's a three minute
    sort of speed dating exercise
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    where a data set is pitched
    and the students organize themselves
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    into groups of three and they then...
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    analyze the data set, work with it
    and they want to tell engaging visual--
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    visualizations with those data sets.
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    So of the 15 data sets
    that were pitched by places
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    like The National Library of Scotland,
    National Records of Scotland,
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    I pitched this data set which is
    The Survey of Scottish Witchcraft database
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    which is one
    of the University of Edinburgh's own
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    and it was in a Microsoft access database.
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    And it basically has all the records
    of witch trials in Scotland
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    from 1563 to 1736,
    stored in a static access database
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    and we just pitched to the students
    what could they do
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    if they turn that into linked open data.
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    And we did that over two years
    and that leveraged some money
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    to hire a Women in STEM student,
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    become an intern for three months
    and she had a background in GIS.
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    So we asked her to look
    at all the place names mentioned
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    in the data set so that she could then
    plot all of these witch trials,
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    all of these accused witches on a map
    which now exists on this website
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    which was live as of a month ago.
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    And we're now pitching to the students
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    a further project of now that
    the information is on Wikidata,
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    can we do some network analysis
    of seeing who the main influencers were
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    and link it up that much better
    and have a really rich understanding
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    of this period of history.
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    Okay, that's me.
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    (Shani) And next--
    Thank you so much, Ewan.
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    - Next is Debora.
    - (Debora) Hi, thank you.
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    Thank you, guys all for being here.
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    I have been a Wikipedia author for forever
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    and I'm a professor
    for Computer Science here in Berlin
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    at a local engineering college.
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    I've been teaching a course called
    Semantic Modeling since about ten years.
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    And in the past three recent years,
    I've started using Wikidata
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    as one of the examples
    for what we're actually doing.
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    Do you want to go onto the next one,
    please, Shani, thank you.
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    What we're doing is this project called,
    University Degrees.
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    Now the students start off
    with the background
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    that they've learned
    all the traditional stuff
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    about RDF and OWL and using Protege
    and it hurts and it's stupid
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    and I hate this.
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    So after we've been through
    the fire of that,
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    then we graduate to Wikidata.
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    And we decided to model
    this microscopic part of the universe
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    called University Degrees
    because we're a university
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    and we know all about university degrees.
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    And because there is a database
    available in Germany called Anabin
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    that has all of the data, theoretically,
    in it on degrees that are granted.
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    I use it as a member
    of the admissions committee
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    for our Masters program
    to see if a Bachelors degree program
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    is accredited or not.
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    And so the idea was,
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    "Well, we'll just dump Anabin
    into Wikidata."
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    Then we learned that reality
    is much, much worse than this actually is.
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    So what they end up doing
    is choosing a country,
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    they researched
    the university structure there,
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    usually just pick one or two universities
    and then try to model the degrees
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    that are granted.
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    We got a property accepted called Grants
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    that a university grants this degree
    and the idea is we can see
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    what degrees are granted by a university
    and when we go to a person
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    that we can model which degree
    they actually have.
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    Now we've ended up with a lot of problems
    and I have some modeling problems
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    I can't model in Wikidata.
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    If anybody have some great ideas,
    I'd love to talk to you about it
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    because we have the issue
    of double degrees
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    and double majors.
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    And there's all sorts of monsters
    running around Wikidata called
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    things like Bachelor of Medicine,
    Bachelor of Surgery.
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    And I just can't imagine putting together
    all the possible combinations
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    of double degrees into Wikidata,
    that would just kill me.
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    There are also degrees
    that have more than one
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    participating university.
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    We found one that has
    five participating universities
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    for the first year
    and three different ones
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    for the second year.
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    And then there's the question
    of Honors degrees
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    which is different
    in all different countries
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    and so it turns out to have
    lots of wonderful modeling issues
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    that I have no idea
    how we're going to go on with this.
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    And the next slide.
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    The last one just to give you an idea,
    we collect stuff.
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    So in our Wiki project, we have a table
    and you're welcome to--
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    if you find something weird,
    to put it in there.
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    We have all these Bachelors degrees
    that we found floating around Wikidata,
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    Masters degrees,
    there's this wonderful one over here
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    under Other, a Masters degree
    in Icelandic Medieval Studies.
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    I think the five people
    who've graduated from that
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    - are probably all on Wikidata, right?
    - (laughter)
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    So anyway, my interest is from more
    of a Computer Science point of view,
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    what is an ontology,
    what is classification systems,
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    how do we go about doing this?
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    And we thought university degrees
    would be easy and they're not.
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    (Shani) Thank you so much, Debora.
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    And next is Akbar Ali.
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    (Akbar) Thank you, Shani
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    My name is Akbar Ali from Dubai,
    United Arab Emirates.
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    I'm working as a Social Science teacher
    in a United Arab Emirates school.
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    Since 2015, I use Wikidata
    and try to introduce Wikidata
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    in the school basic level education,
    especially in high school standard
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    as part of that.
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    Yeah, we introduced Wikidata
    among these high school students,
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    especially to collect data at first,
    especially personal data
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    of the great personalities.
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    And we [carry out] assignments
    to students to collect the data
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    from the Wikidata,
    that was the [inaudible] direction part.
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    And then same [inaudible]
    we did Wikidata info books.
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    Students prepare info books
    by modeling Wikidata
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    that was developed [inaudible].
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    Then the extra activity
    was we had the students
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    from different countries like Pakistan,
    Afghanistan and European countries also.
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    And a lot of students
    are from different languages,
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    so we conducted the translation
    of labels and the descriptions.
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    And from the classroom itself
    we're using the device students edited
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    some descriptions and labels.
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    At the same time, we had four classrooms
    around 28 students
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    were in each classroom,
    so totally we had 112 participation
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    from four classes.
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    And we also encountered
    a teacher training program
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    for teachers who were trying
    to introduce Wikidata
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    into their subject.
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    At the same time, we have some challenges
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    And many students do not have the devices
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    that we are going to tackle
    my next academic year
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    by using a lot of devices.
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    And the internet connectivity
    is another issue,
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    some of the students or sometimes
    we feel the lack of internet connectivity,
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    and that is especially when we try
    these activities in the [inaudible]
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    so there's internet connectivity issues
    [inaudible].
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    And actually Wikidata or Wikipedia,
    it's just not the part of a curriculum
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    but next academic year
    we are trying to introduce,
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    as a curriculum tool, Wikidata.
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    That is one of the future plans
    and we also would like to teach
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    the students some
    of the basic SPARQL query.
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    And same [inaudible]
    we also try to form the Wiki clubs
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    in schools, that is one
    of our future plans.
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    Yeah, that's it.
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    (Shani) Thank you so much.
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    And lastly, we also need
    to meet me, kind of.
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    So hi, everyone, I'm Shani Evenstein.
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    I'm from Israel, I work
    at the Tel Aviv University,
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    I'm an educator and a researcher,
    actually my PhD is about Wikidata,
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    specifically as a learning platform.
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    I've been an open knowledge advocate
    for a long time now
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    and just recently became
    part of the Board of Trustees.
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    The only reason I have to mention it
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    is just to say that everything I say here
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    is not in my hat as a trustee
    or a representation of the WMF,
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    but rather of me as a volunteer
    and an educator and a researcher.
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    And I want to tell you a bit
    about my experience.
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    So I've been teaching Wikidata,
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    I would say since--
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    2014 would be the first year
    that I started to introduce it
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    to my courses.
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    But I would--before delving
    into my courses,
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    I would say that
    there are two major models
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    of incorporating Wikidata
    into the academic curriculum
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    or the educational curriculum.
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    One is an alternative assessment.
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    That is when different lecturers decide
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    to give their students an assignment
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    on Wikidata, using Wikidata--
    previously it was Wikipedia, right?
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    Like everything we now experience
    with Wikidata is like what we had
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    about ten years ago with Wikipedia.
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    So we're going through, in a way,
    the same process now
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    of introducing Wikidata
    as a learning platform
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    to the educational world in a way.
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    And just like with Wikipedia,
    there are two models
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    that are maybe more but two major ones
    that I could at least recognize
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    and I work with both.
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    So the first is instead of the students
    being tested or writing a paper,
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    they do something
    on Wikipedia or Wikidata,
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    that's the first model.
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    And in that sense, I've been supporting
    a variety of lecturers
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    around Israel in various universities
    around Israel,
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    starting in 2017.
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    So it took some time, right.
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    It's almost five years since Wikidata
    was formed for academia
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    to start actually engaging with it.
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    In Israel, at least.
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    In academic courses, as an assignment
    or as something that we--
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    We've actually mentioned it
    a bit before in courses.
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    about not really having the students
    write anything, right.
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    And the first ones to interact
    were people from Computer Sciences,
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    from Digital Humanities,
    that sort of fields
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    because it was a natural way
    of giving the students a project
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    that they can actually apply
    that is related to what they study.
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    This coming semester,
    I'm going to support two such activities,
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    one in an international
    digital culture studies,
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    in a digital discourse course.
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    And we're going to have
    a Wikidata workshop
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    and that's going to be part
    of the students' assessment.
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    And also something that
    I'm actually very much excited about,
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    at the Bar Ilan University
    Computer Science Department
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    on a course on Semantic Web.
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    They have--and that is going
    to be in collaboration
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    with the Israel Antiquities Authority.
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    And the thing is, the lecturer
    that teaches this course
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    wanted the students to have a project
    that actually means something.
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    So she thought Wikidata
    would be a good option.
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    So this is what we're--
    this is going to be how we start, right.
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    On the right, these are the cards
    that we get from
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    the Israel Antiquities Services.
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    These are Word files, by the way,
    Word files, okay.
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    Nothing is--Word files,
    I'll say it again.
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    Nothing is digitized.
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    And what we want to do
    is have the students
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    work on these, model these.
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    Now because it's a Semantic Web course,
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    they have been grappling
    with how to model things
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    and they've been using what Debora
    has been doing basically
  • 17:45 - 17:50
    using Protege and using OWL
    and using very basic RDF
  • 17:52 - 17:54
    way of thought in terms of doing it.
  • 17:54 - 17:58
    And the trick is going to be
    how we can then take it
  • 17:58 - 18:01
    and map it into Wikidata
    which is a real live--
  • 18:02 - 18:05
    with a flexible ontology kind of project.
  • 18:05 - 18:08
    So that's coming up this semester.
  • 18:08 - 18:13
    And I would say the second model
    is one where Wikidata assignments
  • 18:13 - 18:15
    is the main assessment.
  • 18:15 - 18:19
    That is happening, as far as I know,
    today only with my courses
  • 18:19 - 18:20
    at Tel Aviv University.
  • 18:20 - 18:24
    But as some of you know,
    I have opened elective courses
  • 18:24 - 18:29
    at Tel Aviv University
    where my students basically
  • 18:29 - 18:31
    contribute to Wikipedia.
  • 18:32 - 18:37
    The first course was in 2013
    and then a second course opened in 2015
  • 18:37 - 18:40
    for the whole campus, so basically
    every undergraduate student
  • 18:40 - 18:43
    at Tel Aviv University
    can take such a course.
  • 18:43 - 18:47
    And why I'm mentioning it
    is because last year
  • 18:47 - 18:50
    I completely transformed
    a curriculum of that course
  • 18:50 - 18:54
    to basically feature Wikidata
    in an academic course
  • 18:54 - 18:55
    for the first time.
  • 18:55 - 19:00
    And this is a course called
    from Web 2 to Web 3,
  • 19:00 - 19:02
    from Wikipedia to Wikidata.
  • 19:02 - 19:05
    And these are my--this is the first class
  • 19:05 - 19:08
    that graduated from that course.
  • 19:08 - 19:11
    And in this course, of course
    Wikidata was--the assignment
  • 19:11 - 19:13
    was the main thing.
  • 19:13 - 19:15
    Like using Wikidata
    and learning about Wikidata
  • 19:15 - 19:16
    was the main thing of the course.
  • 19:16 - 19:20
    It's not just an assignment in a course
    that deals with something else.
  • 19:20 - 19:24
    So these are the two different models,
    this is what I've been doing,
  • 19:24 - 19:30
    and now that you know all of us,
    I'm hoping that you can see
  • 19:30 - 19:35
    only from the introduction
    how, in a way, diverse it is.
  • 19:35 - 19:38
    How you can do it in very different ways--
  • 19:38 - 19:44
    there's just not just one way
    of doing it or dealing with it.
  • 19:44 - 19:47
    But there are some things
    that I think are in common
  • 19:47 - 19:52
    to all of us and some specific,
    I would say, challenges
  • 19:52 - 19:54
    or issues that we all deal with.
  • 19:54 - 19:57
    So I thought it would be interesting
    to have a discussion
  • 19:57 - 20:02
    with the panelists now
    and see how they have come to be
  • 20:02 - 20:06
    in a place where they even incorporate
    Wikidata into the curriculum
  • 20:06 - 20:10
    because that's not happening
    out of the blue, right.
  • 20:10 - 20:12
    We have to actually work for it to happen.
  • 20:12 - 20:16
    And there has been work
    being done for years and years,
  • 20:16 - 20:18
    for me to open that course, for instance.
  • 20:18 - 20:21
    I had to--it started
    with one session in a course
  • 20:21 - 20:23
    and then a year later, two sessions
    and three sessions,
  • 20:23 - 20:26
    and I wasn't satisfied and I wanted
    more and more and more
  • 20:26 - 20:30
    until I was able to convince
    the university to actually do it.
  • 20:30 - 20:33
    But I'm quite sure
    that all of these panelists
  • 20:33 - 20:37
    have their own challenges
    in terms of persuading
  • 20:37 - 20:42
    the academic institutions where they're at
    to actually even go for it.
  • 20:42 - 20:46
    So I would be very happy
    to start the discussion
  • 20:46 - 20:50
    by asking you what did you have to do
  • 20:50 - 20:54
    to persuade your institutions
    to even do it?
  • 20:58 - 20:59
    Let's see.
  • 20:59 - 21:05
    Yeah, so, I mean our institution
    was hosting me to work
  • 21:05 - 21:08
    with course leaders
    and they were very much...
  • 21:10 - 21:13
    mindful that the bread and butter
    of what I was doing should really be
  • 21:13 - 21:15
    within curriculum work.
  • 21:15 - 21:20
    And we had a course
    that was Data Science for Design,
  • 21:20 - 21:23
    and I just happened
    to be running a workshop
  • 21:23 - 21:26
    where one of the course leaders
    was attending.
  • 21:26 - 21:31
    And it percolated, struck,
    and he was looking for people
  • 21:31 - 21:36
    to pitch data sets, and Wikidata
    was an interesting data set
  • 21:36 - 21:37
    for him to model.
  • 21:37 - 21:38
    He was actually interested
  • 21:38 - 21:45
    in me pitching the idea
    of Wikimedia's data on harassment
  • 21:46 - 21:50
    to the students--he was looking--
    but I looked into that a bit
  • 21:50 - 21:55
    and we thought maybe
    we could do something with
  • 21:55 - 21:58
    The Survey of Scottish Witchcraft data
    and we approached the court,
  • 21:58 - 22:02
    the people behind that database
    and said could we release this
  • 22:02 - 22:05
    as open linked open data
    and see what the students
  • 22:05 - 22:06
    could do with it.
  • 22:06 - 22:12
    Because they were trying to let
    the websites survive
  • 22:12 - 22:16
    and the data survive because
    it's not really been used since 2003.
  • 22:16 - 22:17
    They were quite interested
  • 22:17 - 22:20
    - (Shani) Could be done.
    - in what new insights could be done.
  • 22:20 - 22:24
    So it was pushing
    against an open door, really
  • 22:24 - 22:27
    in that particular way
    but there was a lot of work
  • 22:27 - 22:29
    that went behind that,
  • 22:29 - 22:33
    - the years to persuade, I would say.
    - (Shani) Yeah.
  • 22:33 - 22:37
    (Shani) But in any case, it sounds like
    you're one of the lucky ones, right.
  • 22:37 - 22:42
    You're a Wikimedian in Residence
    at a university--woohoo!
  • 22:42 - 22:44
    We have to say something
    about that in itself
  • 22:44 - 22:47
    because I think the fact
    that academic institutions
  • 22:47 - 22:50
    are now starting to realize
    that they even need this position,
  • 22:50 - 22:53
    - is something kind of new and you're--
    - Yeah.
  • 22:53 - 22:56
    (Shani) You're a pioneer in that sense
    and we have a bunch of others
  • 22:56 - 22:58
    now joining you around the world.
  • 22:58 - 23:00
    But it's quite amazing.
  • 23:00 - 23:02
    Yes, Andy's in the audience as well.
  • 23:02 - 23:07
    So I hope he's feeling better actually,
    but yeah, he's at Coventry University
  • 23:07 - 23:09
    and a Wikimedian in Residence there.
  • 23:09 - 23:11
    - So we'd like more.
    - (Shani) Yes.
  • 23:11 - 23:17
    Martin Poulter at Oxford University
    was kind of the inspiration
  • 23:17 - 23:21
    for my own residency
    because he was doing editathons
  • 23:21 - 23:24
    at the Bodleian Library on the Great War
  • 23:24 - 23:27
    and Ada Lovelace Day
  • 23:27 - 23:32
    and our director of IT, Melissa Highton
    was looking at what the work
  • 23:32 - 23:35
    - he was doing at Oxford and thinking--
    - (Shani) She was inspired.
  • 23:35 - 23:38
    Could it be applied
    in teaching and learning?
  • 23:38 - 23:40
    Did it have to be libraries only?
  • 23:40 - 23:44
    Or did information literacy,
    digital skills,
  • 23:45 - 23:48
    how under representations of knowledge,
    did that have applications
  • 23:48 - 23:51
    in teaching and learning
    and that's kind of--
  • 23:51 - 23:55
    So she ran an editathon
    in Edinburgh on the Edinburgh Seven,
  • 23:55 - 24:00
    the first female undergraduates in Britain
    who didn't have Wikipedia pages
  • 24:00 - 24:01
    at the time.
  • 24:01 - 24:04
    And she invited
    Professor Allison Littlejohn,
  • 24:04 - 24:07
    who's now Dean of Teaching and Learning
    at University of Glasgow
  • 24:07 - 24:11
    to come and do some research
    to make sure it wasn't just a gimmick,
  • 24:11 - 24:14
    that it was actual genuine teaching
    and learning going on
  • 24:14 - 24:16
    in these editing environments.
  • 24:16 - 24:20
    And she's produced about five or six
    research papers that says
  • 24:20 - 24:24
    there is an actual point
    to doing this in education.
  • 24:24 - 24:27
    (Shani) Yeah and I think you're making
    an important point
  • 24:27 - 24:31
    about how we also need academic research,
  • 24:31 - 24:33
    showing that this is valuable, right.
  • 24:33 - 24:36
    And currently, we have zero.
  • 24:36 - 24:40
    I mean besides my research
    that I'm working on now
  • 24:40 - 24:44
    and will take some time
    to publish, there is zero,
  • 24:45 - 24:47
    zero research about education
    and Wikidata.
  • 24:47 - 24:50
    We have tons of research about Wikidata
  • 24:50 - 24:53
    but not about how it could be used
    as an educational platform
  • 24:53 - 24:54
    in that sense.
  • 24:54 - 24:57
    You've mentioned literacies
    and we actually have a bunch of--
  • 24:58 - 25:01
    quite a lot of academic research
    about how to utilize Wikipedia,
  • 25:01 - 25:08
    in that sense and how it helps
    to enhance all sorts of literacies, right,
  • 25:08 - 25:12
    digital skills, academic skills,
    critical thinking, collaborative work,
  • 25:12 - 25:13
    all of that.
  • 25:13 - 25:17
    And I think Wikidata
    is taking it one step further
  • 25:17 - 25:20
    and we can use it
    to teach people data literacy.
  • 25:20 - 25:24
    But we have zero research
    to support that and therefore it's--
  • 25:25 - 25:29
    we are just at a beginning stage
    in that sense.
  • 25:29 - 25:30
    - Yeah.
    - (Shani) And so, yeah,
  • 25:30 - 25:32
    (Shani) And so what you're saying
    just supports that.
  • 25:32 - 25:37
    Yeah, we're a research-based institution
    so we have to set an evidence
  • 25:37 - 25:42
    what we're doing
    and there is worthwhile academic purpose.
  • 25:42 - 25:47
    So yeah, we've got these research papers
    on Wikipedia editing.
  • 25:47 - 25:49
    But yeah, more on WIkidata
    would definitely help
  • 25:49 - 25:51
    - make the case further.
    - (Shani) Yeah.
  • 25:51 - 25:52
    (Shani) Debora, what about you?
  • 25:52 - 25:55
    - (Debora) Well, I'm lucky too
    - (Shani) Yes, yes, you are.
  • 25:55 - 25:58
    because I'm a German professor
    and that means all I have is a heading.
  • 25:58 - 26:02
    - (Shani) You can do whatever you want.
    - And I can choose what I want to teach.
  • 26:02 - 26:03
    And I put the heading
    in the curriculum anyway
  • 26:03 - 26:07
    because I designed the curriculum
    so that makes it a lot easier.
  • 26:07 - 26:10
    I was very lucky that I had
    two really great students
  • 26:10 - 26:14
    who had been working here
    at the Wikimedia Foundation,
  • 26:14 - 26:18
    the German Wikimedia Foundation
    as student programmers,
  • 26:18 - 26:19
    Lucy and Charlie.
  • 26:19 - 26:24
    And they both did
    their Bachelors thesis on Wikidata.
  • 26:24 - 26:27
    And I mean you may have heard of Lucy's--
    that's the article placeholder.
  • 26:27 - 26:29
    That was her Bachelors thesis.
  • 26:29 - 26:31
    And so it was clear that
  • 26:31 - 26:33
    if it's easy enough
    for some brilliant Bachelors to do,
  • 26:33 - 26:36
    my Masters had better
    be able to do it as well.
  • 26:36 - 26:41
    And so that's when I started
    working our way into that.
  • 26:41 - 26:45
    And the students really enjoyed
    doing something real.
  • 26:45 - 26:50
    And not just something that's
    get a grade and then it's gone.
  • 26:50 - 26:52
    They found this was it, it's scary too.
  • 26:52 - 26:55
    Because you make a change
    and then some editor comes along
  • 26:55 - 26:58
    and screams at you
    because you made a stupid mistake.
  • 26:58 - 26:59
    But it's okay.
  • 26:59 - 27:03
    It's a Wiki, we can turn it back
    and start over again.
  • 27:03 - 27:06
    (Shani) Yeah, João, what about you?
  • 27:09 - 27:15
    Okay, so I guess my use of Wikidata
    is dependent on my use of Wikipedia
  • 27:15 - 27:17
    as an educator.
  • 27:17 - 27:23
    So I started doing Wiki assignments
    in 2014 when I was just hired
  • 27:24 - 27:27
    as a university professor
    and that was challenging
  • 27:27 - 27:31
    because my school
    didn't really understand,
  • 27:31 - 27:33
    had never done it.
  • 27:33 - 27:37
    So I didn't really know what to expect,
    if it was going to work out.
  • 27:37 - 27:40
    I actually was not a Wikimedian
    at the time.
  • 27:40 - 27:44
    I just read a book--I had a grad student
  • 27:44 - 27:46
    and then I said okay, that might be cool.
  • 27:46 - 27:48
    It was my time so I work.
  • 27:50 - 27:54
    The university where I work,
    they required that I did
  • 27:54 - 27:56
    the Wikipedia assignment
  • 27:56 - 28:01
    as well as the expected evaluation
  • 28:01 - 28:03
    of my seminar.
  • 28:03 - 28:05
    So it was basically double grading.
  • 28:06 - 28:11
    And I had at the time 175 students.
  • 28:11 - 28:17
    It was really hard but then to some extent
    they've seen they couldn't change me
  • 28:17 - 28:20
    so they had to adapt.
  • 28:20 - 28:24
    And now I transition to Wikidata,
    it was easier, I guess.
  • 28:24 - 28:28
    Because now I'm a little bit more senior
    and they let me do whatever I want
  • 28:28 - 28:31
    just like what you were saying
    and just okay, they don't even ask anymore
  • 28:31 - 28:32
    what I'm doing.
  • 28:33 - 28:37
    And I think the whole use
  • 28:37 - 28:39
    of Wikipedia and Wikidata now for me
  • 28:39 - 28:45
    is just-- there are problems
    that need to be solved
  • 28:46 - 28:48
    in knowledge building.
  • 28:48 - 28:51
    Sometimes you need Wikipedia,
    sometimes you need Wikidata,
  • 28:51 - 28:53
    sometimes you need Wikivoyage,
    Wikimedia Commons.
  • 28:53 - 28:55
    So we just started our project,
    for instance,
  • 28:55 - 28:58
    on structured data on Commons.
  • 28:58 - 29:03
    We've uploaded from a GLAM project
    a thousand files coming from
  • 29:03 - 29:07
    the military dictatorship,
    no one knows anything about them.
  • 29:08 - 29:13
    And we are working with my students
    to identify, to depict anything we can
  • 29:13 - 29:19
    on the pictures with the expectation
    that if we identify there are 17 stairs
  • 29:20 - 29:23
    on the building which the students
    were protesting the government,
  • 29:23 - 29:25
    we can identify the building.
  • 29:26 - 29:28
    So I think you go with a purpose.
  • 29:28 - 29:33
    That's the whole thing
    of what we are doing in general.
  • 29:33 - 29:36
    It has value, it's meaningful.
  • 29:36 - 29:39
    And if you're able to convey that
    to the students
  • 29:39 - 29:44
    and then broaden and deepen
    the experience of meaningfulness
  • 29:44 - 29:50
    that they can acquire from data literacy
    or media training,
  • 29:50 - 29:55
    or I don't know, history understanding
    political values, democracy,
  • 29:55 - 29:59
    whatever you're working on as a professor,
  • 29:59 - 30:01
    then you've reached the purpose.
  • 30:01 - 30:06
    I think it's just for me it's a resource,
    and it's a marvelous resource,
  • 30:06 - 30:12
    and I'm glad I'm part of this community
    because it helps building this resource.
  • 30:12 - 30:16
    (Shani) So basically you either
    have to become a Wikimedian in Residence
  • 30:16 - 30:20
    or become a university professor
    to be able to do whatever you want.
  • 30:20 - 30:24
    But not everyone is in that position
    and I think Akbar Ali
  • 30:24 - 30:28
    is representing another view of that
    which is also important
  • 30:28 - 30:30
    and in a way, me as well.
  • 30:30 - 30:36
    I mean having one step at the door
    is making it easier to implement changes
  • 30:36 - 30:38
    once you're already in.
  • 30:38 - 30:42
    But making that first step
    to convince the institution
  • 30:42 - 30:45
    that it's even worthwhile
    is very difficult.
  • 30:45 - 30:47
    It's very challenging.
  • 30:47 - 30:52
    And so I want to kind of move
    between this question and the next one
  • 30:52 - 30:54
    and start talking about
    some of the challenges
  • 30:54 - 30:57
    that we're all facing doing this work.
  • 30:57 - 31:01
    So I think you're the perfect person
    to start with that
  • 31:01 - 31:03
    because you've already mentioned
    a bit of the challenges
  • 31:03 - 31:06
    but maybe you can explain some more.
  • 31:07 - 31:08
    Okay.
  • 31:08 - 31:09
    Actually there was always a question
  • 31:09 - 31:12
    what would be the new innovative
    teaching method.
  • 31:12 - 31:15
    That was the question realized
    in the teachers' community in the UAE.
  • 31:15 - 31:18
    So I thought to share
    about the Wikidata at first,
  • 31:18 - 31:19
    that will be new for them.
  • 31:19 - 31:24
    So I was part of the collection--
    as part of the doing assignment
  • 31:24 - 31:27
    [inaudible] usually the students use
  • 31:27 - 31:29
    Google or something,
    other websites like Wikipedia.
  • 31:29 - 31:32
    But Wikidata was a new thing for them.
  • 31:32 - 31:36
    So first of all, we started by collecting
    the information from Wikidata.
  • 31:36 - 31:42
    We framed the template in the paper,
    [inaudible] Wikidata template.
  • 31:42 - 31:47
    So it was a good thing for understanding
    the structure of Wikidata for students.
  • 31:48 - 31:51
    And we started to collect information.
  • 31:51 - 31:55
    But there was one problem that
    when we do the content-wise,
  • 31:55 - 31:58
    like when we add a content into Wikidata,
  • 31:58 - 32:01
    students did not create a user
    [inaudible]
  • 32:01 - 32:03
    especially they need email ID.
  • 32:03 - 32:05
    So actually they are high school students
  • 32:05 - 32:09
    so most of them had no email ID,
    so what we have them then
  • 32:09 - 32:14
    by using Google Spreadsheet
    the data which we created
  • 32:14 - 32:19
    that we move to Google Spreadsheet,
    then myself, I was adding
  • 32:19 - 32:22
    all this data into Wikidata
    by using quick statements.
  • 32:22 - 32:27
    Actually that is one of the challenge
    we need to give a chance for students
  • 32:27 - 32:33
    to create their own ID especially
    if they are high school level students,
  • 32:33 - 32:39
    so they need email procedures
    that is also still challenges there.
  • 32:39 - 32:43
    If we are overcome,
    if the parents are permitting that,
  • 32:43 - 32:49
    we can create hundreds of students
    a user ID and their contribution
  • 32:49 - 32:50
    will be there.
  • 32:50 - 32:51
    That is one of the challenges.
  • 32:51 - 32:55
    The second thing, I was the head
    of the Department of Social Science
  • 32:55 - 33:01
    so I could integrate Wikidata
    as part of our curriculum adaptation plan.
  • 33:01 - 33:07
    But at the same time,
    how to run these Wikidata projects
  • 33:07 - 33:10
    and all other subjects,
    we need to get the support
  • 33:10 - 33:14
    of especially the school full team.
  • 33:14 - 33:18
    So I think we need to give
    much training and awareness
  • 33:18 - 33:22
    to the teachers, one of the uses
    of Wikidata, how can we integrate Wikidata
  • 33:22 - 33:25
    as an educational tool in the curriculum.
  • 33:25 - 33:28
    Surely, if the teachers are convinced
    and if they agree to that,
  • 33:28 - 33:32
    I think we can solve those problems too.
  • 33:32 - 33:34
    You said there are two problems,
    from teacher's side
  • 33:34 - 33:35
    or from student's side.
  • 33:35 - 33:38
    (Shani) Yeah, I think you're making
    a really important point
  • 33:38 - 33:40
    about creating awareness, right.
  • 33:40 - 33:42
    - Yes.
    - (Shani) And I think Ewan also talked
  • 33:42 - 33:43
    about that.
  • 33:43 - 33:47
    Sometimes it's as simple as someone
    sitting at the right place
  • 33:47 - 33:51
    at the right time at a lecture
    that you're giving someplace,
  • 33:51 - 33:55
    and it sparks something in their mind
    and they kind of get it.
  • 33:55 - 33:58
    And then you can expand from there.
  • 33:58 - 34:02
    But without that legwork
    the grassroots work
  • 34:03 - 34:06
    that we've all been doing,
    it would be impossible
  • 34:06 - 34:11
    to get to a residency position
    or to have university professors
  • 34:11 - 34:13
    decide to incorporate it
    into their curriculum
  • 34:13 - 34:15
    because it's a lot of work.
  • 34:15 - 34:16
    It takes work.
  • 34:16 - 34:20
    Even doing it just with Wikipedia
    takes work as we all know.
  • 34:20 - 34:23
    And so yeah, that's an important step,
  • 34:23 - 34:26
    in a way, in creating this atmosphere
  • 34:26 - 34:32
    or this eco-system where this is a thing
    that we do in higher education.
  • 34:32 - 34:37
    And we're basically, as we said,
    at the very beginning stages
  • 34:37 - 34:42
    of disseminating the idea even
    that this is possible,
  • 34:42 - 34:44
    that this needs to happen,
    that this has to happen
  • 34:44 - 34:49
    because that's the only good tool
    that we have today
  • 34:49 - 34:52
    to basically teach the students
    data literacy.
  • 34:52 - 34:58
    So I want to hear, Debora, a bit more
    about your challenges
  • 34:58 - 35:02
    in your courses because, obviously,
    starting is not the issue here
  • 35:02 - 35:04
    but you have some other challenges.
  • 35:04 - 35:07
    Right, we have other challenges
    in the sense that we're interacting
  • 35:07 - 35:11
    with the Wikidata community
    in a weird time fashion.
  • 35:11 - 35:17
    It's all compressed into this semester,
    and it's the second half of the semester.
  • 35:17 - 35:21
    So when we want things changed,
    we want them changed fast.
  • 35:21 - 35:24
    Getting the property of grants
    put through took--
  • 35:24 - 35:26
    it didn't come through
    until like a week
  • 35:26 - 35:28
    before the semester was over.
  • 35:28 - 35:32
    Luckily, everybody had their quick
    statement sheets all ready to go.
  • 35:32 - 35:34
    We just put the number in, pushed a button
  • 35:34 - 35:36
    and did a lot of edits.
  • 35:36 - 35:40
    And then we were dead for half a year
    because I only teach this class
  • 35:40 - 35:41
    in the summer.
  • 35:41 - 35:46
    So we have another one
    that we had proposed this summer,
  • 35:46 - 35:49
    the double degree one
    because there are so many
  • 35:50 - 35:53
    people who have double degrees
    and we weren't sure
  • 35:53 - 35:58
    how to model it anyway
    but we proposed this property
  • 35:58 - 36:01
    and now it's marked as,
    "This seems to be dead
  • 36:01 - 36:03
    because nobody's interested
    in it anymore."
  • 36:03 - 36:05
    Well, we're interested
    but we're not interested
  • 36:05 - 36:07
    until next summer again.
  • 36:07 - 36:11
    So we don't have this continuous
    interaction with the community.
  • 36:11 - 36:14
    - But it comes in fits and starts.
    - (Shani) Yeah.
  • 36:14 - 36:16
    (Shani) So in a way, what you're saying is
  • 36:17 - 36:21
    just stressing the importance
    of being in close relationship
  • 36:21 - 36:24
    with the Wikidata community
    and that is true, I would say,
  • 36:24 - 36:28
    to incorporating any Wiki project
    into the curriculum.
  • 36:28 - 36:30
    You have to have the support
    of the community.
  • 36:30 - 36:34
    If the community is not behind you,
    in a way, it could become messy.
  • 36:34 - 36:38
    So that's a good takeaway,
    I would say in general.
  • 36:38 - 36:40
    João, what about some of your challenges?
  • 36:42 - 36:47
    Okay, so with Wikidata particularly,
  • 36:47 - 36:48
    I think one challenge that relates
  • 36:48 - 36:53
    what you're saying about
    the lack of academic research,
  • 36:53 - 36:59
    it's also the lack of resources
    that we can use for students.
  • 36:59 - 37:03
    So I think we've created
    for one of the projects
  • 37:03 - 37:06
    that I was just shown,
    you have to have [Giovanna]
  • 37:06 - 37:11
    [inaudible] are here at the conference
    as well--Giovanna's here...
  • 37:11 - 37:14
    So she was my student, so--
  • 37:14 - 37:16
    they were all my students.
  • 37:16 - 37:19
    There is a process of multiplication
    to some extent with
  • 37:19 - 37:20
    what we are doing.
  • 37:20 - 37:23
    But we needed resources.
  • 37:23 - 37:30
    And so students could actually rely on
    to edit Wikidata and understand
  • 37:30 - 37:33
    what they need to do and to work
    on structured data on Commons.
  • 37:33 - 37:35
    This was a challenge.
  • 37:35 - 37:38
    So we had to put time on that.
  • 37:39 - 37:45
    I think that was a major challenge
    and another challenge that I see
  • 37:45 - 37:50
    which is again, always worrisome
    is that my students
  • 37:50 - 37:54
    assess Wikidata assignments as boring,
  • 37:54 - 37:58
    which for me is really tough to digest.
  • 37:58 - 38:01
    They love doing Wikipedia now.
  • 38:01 - 38:05
    But Wikidata is just filling out
    a form for them.
  • 38:06 - 38:08
    And I think that something
    that we need to improve
  • 38:08 - 38:12
    if we want to use it
    as an educational resource
  • 38:12 - 38:15
    because they are willing to do it,
    they see the purpose,
  • 38:15 - 38:18
    it's just the actual operation is boring.
  • 38:18 - 38:22
    And I think that's something that
    we need to improve design
  • 38:22 - 38:25
    for education
    as an open education resource.
  • 38:25 - 38:27
    (Shani) Yeah, I'm going to use
    what you're saying--
  • 38:27 - 38:30
    (audience 2) You need to see the magic.
  • 38:30 - 38:33
    You need to introduce the magic
    of SPARQL queries
  • 38:33 - 38:36
    and all those kind of models
    into your students.
  • 38:36 - 38:40
    That's why I have a feeling that
  • 38:43 - 38:47
    because in Kerala last year
    we tried conducting
  • 38:47 - 38:51
    a series of workshops
    for engineering college students
  • 38:52 - 38:55
    as a part of my user group activity.
  • 38:55 - 38:59
    Nearly 12 engineering colleges,
    we've gone to all the colleges
  • 38:59 - 39:04
    and done Wikidata workshops
    with hands-on editing.
  • 39:04 - 39:07
    And yeah, it's boring,
    initially it's boring,
  • 39:07 - 39:10
    it's filling up a form for students.
  • 39:10 - 39:14
    But we switch to SPARQL queries
    and we are showing
  • 39:14 - 39:20
    this kind of linked data models
    and all the maps and all those stuffs,
  • 39:20 - 39:24
    yeah, then the scenario changes,
    it's super interesting.
  • 39:24 - 39:30
    It suddenly becomes a big thing
    for the Computer Science students.
  • 39:31 - 39:35
    And also yeah, we had some partnership
  • 39:35 - 39:38
    with the language departments
  • 39:38 - 39:40
    in some universities.
  • 39:41 - 39:45
    This year, I am going to talk
    about Lexemes, Lexeme projects,
  • 39:45 - 39:49
    so that language departments
  • 39:49 - 39:52
    can model that language
  • 39:52 - 39:55
    and add a lot of data so--
  • 39:55 - 39:57
    Yeah, that's it,
    you can make it interesting.
  • 39:57 - 40:00
    There's a lot of ways out there
    in Wikidata, I think.
  • 40:00 - 40:04
    (Shani) Yeah, thank you for adding
    from your experience.
  • 40:04 - 40:07
    I want to go back to what João was saying.
  • 40:07 - 40:10
    João was making
    two important points, I think.
  • 40:10 - 40:13
    One is about awareness
    that we're still lacking
  • 40:13 - 40:17
    and the fact that we don't have
    enough resources yet
  • 40:17 - 40:22
    to use it well in an educational setting
    and since we're--
  • 40:23 - 40:27
    Maybe it's a good time to open
    a parenthesis and say,
  • 40:27 - 40:30
    "We are just five examples
    from around the world."
  • 40:30 - 40:34
    Obviously there are a lot of other people
    doing amazing work
  • 40:34 - 40:38
    in other places in the world
    in other academic institutions
  • 40:38 - 40:41
    or educational settings
    and we've already acknowledged
  • 40:41 - 40:43
    some of them.
  • 40:43 - 40:46
    I encourage you to also speak to Matthew,
  • 40:46 - 40:51
    to Jason Evans, who's here.
  • 40:52 - 40:54
    To Will Kent, can you say hi.
  • 40:54 - 40:59
    And I specifically want
    to acknowledge Will, who's here
  • 40:59 - 41:02
    because Will is part
    of Wiki Ed Foundation.
  • 41:02 - 41:06
    They are the education program
    for the U.S. and Canada
  • 41:06 - 41:09
    and what they've done,
    they've waited for some time
  • 41:09 - 41:12
    but when they do things, they do it right.
  • 41:12 - 41:15
    And they created
    an online training for Wikidata
  • 41:15 - 41:19
    which is now an online module
    that all of us can use.
  • 41:19 - 41:24
    So they're helping to create
    resources in that sense
  • 41:24 - 41:26
    that other people can use,
    I also want to acknowledge
  • 41:26 - 41:30
    [inaudible] who's sitting here,
    who has been a guest lecturer
  • 41:30 - 41:34
    at a variety of institutions
    around the world,
  • 41:34 - 41:40
    helping to eventualize, in a sense,
    for Wikidata and without resources
  • 41:40 - 41:44
    such as his introduction to Wikidata,
    it would have been more difficult
  • 41:44 - 41:45
    to disseminate.
  • 41:45 - 41:49
    So this is just to stress
    that we as a community
  • 41:49 - 41:52
    are at the very beginning stages
    of creating actual resources
  • 41:52 - 41:56
    that will help other educators
    do this kind of work.
  • 41:56 - 41:59
    That's one challenge, resources,
  • 41:59 - 42:01
    and I want to go back to assignments also.
  • 42:02 - 42:06
    João mentioned that for him
    creating the right assignment
  • 42:06 - 42:07
    is a challenge.
  • 42:07 - 42:09
    And I would concur.
  • 42:09 - 42:11
    I agreed completely.
  • 42:11 - 42:16
    It has been my challenge as well,
    both as an alternative assessment
  • 42:16 - 42:19
    and both in the model
    of the whole university course
  • 42:19 - 42:24
    to make sure that I have assignments
    that are the right size,
  • 42:24 - 42:26
    the right scope
  • 42:26 - 42:31
    and are understandable to the students
    and also interesting enough
  • 42:31 - 42:33
    for them to actually want to engage.
  • 42:34 - 42:37
    And also that it's clear
    how I assess their progress.
  • 42:37 - 42:43
    So in a way, a bit of what happened to me
    using Wikipedia in the classroom
  • 42:43 - 42:45
    is now happening with Wikidata.
  • 42:45 - 42:47
    I was very ambitious at the beginning.
  • 42:47 - 42:51
    Even when I was coming
    to support someone else's course
  • 42:51 - 42:53
    and I would do two sessions,
  • 42:53 - 42:58
    let's say, of an an intro
    and then a workshop about Wikipedia.
  • 42:58 - 43:02
    And I would strive for the students
    to write full articles
  • 43:02 - 43:04
    or to expand or do something
    really meaningful.
  • 43:04 - 43:07
    As I did it more and more
    throughout the years,
  • 43:07 - 43:11
    I found myself shrinking
    the size of the assignments
  • 43:11 - 43:13
    and creating like mini assignments or--
  • 43:14 - 43:17
    Today we'd like to talk
    about mini contributions, right,
  • 43:17 - 43:22
    so finding cool and interesting ways
    for the students to contribute something
  • 43:22 - 43:26
    but that it's not too much is important.
  • 43:26 - 43:29
    And just the way I went and shrunk
  • 43:29 - 43:33
    over the years the Wikipedia assignments,
    I find that it's really important
  • 43:33 - 43:35
    to do the same with Wikidata.
  • 43:35 - 43:39
    So giving the students something
    on the one hand meaningful,
  • 43:39 - 43:44
    and on the other hand
    with clear boundaries
  • 43:44 - 43:48
    that I could--like very clear steps
    of what they need to do,
  • 43:48 - 43:52
    how they can engage
    but still making it interesting enough
  • 43:52 - 43:56
    has been a challenge in my courses
    and it's still a work in progress.
  • 43:56 - 43:58
    I keep experimenting.
  • 43:58 - 44:00
    And I think
    that's the most important thing
  • 44:00 - 44:03
    that we're all experimenting
    with this platform
  • 44:03 - 44:07
    and trying to look for new ways
    to incorporate it
  • 44:08 - 44:11
    into the academic curriculum
    because we understand it's important.
  • 44:12 - 44:15
    But I would totally agree
    that it's like you said,
  • 44:15 - 44:19
    you need to create that awareness,
    and in that sense,
  • 44:19 - 44:23
    I want to ask the panelists
    what have worked for you?
  • 44:23 - 44:26
    Like what helped you do the work
    that you do?
  • 44:26 - 44:27
    So Debora, you first.
  • 44:29 - 44:33
    One of the important things that I find
    that helped me do the work
  • 44:33 - 44:35
    is making sure that we document
    everything on Wiki.
  • 44:36 - 44:39
    That we don't have thousands
    of little documents flying
  • 44:39 - 44:40
    all over the place.
  • 44:40 - 44:43
    But that we have our discussions on Wiki.
  • 44:43 - 44:45
    That we have our project page on Wiki.
  • 44:45 - 44:48
    That the students hand in
    their reports on Wiki
  • 44:48 - 44:52
    so that the next group can look back
    and see what the others did,
  • 44:52 - 44:55
    what helped them, what didn't help them
    and that helps the next group
  • 44:55 - 44:58
    start at a higher level
    than the group before.
  • 44:59 - 45:03
    (Shani) That is certainly one approach
    to keep everything in one place.
  • 45:03 - 45:06
    I would just suggest from my experience
    in knowing the work that
  • 45:06 - 45:10
    others are doing
    that some educators choose
  • 45:10 - 45:12
    - to use social media
    - No.
  • 45:12 - 45:13
    (Shani) as another means.
    (chuckles)
  • 45:13 - 45:16
    No, stay on Wiki.
  • 45:16 - 45:19
    I'm actually forbidden from using Facebook
  • 45:19 - 45:21
    in instruction at my university.
  • 45:21 - 45:23
    So I would not be able to use it.
  • 45:23 - 45:27
    I heard there must be some Facebook group
    or something, that's no go.
  • 45:27 - 45:32
    It has to be on Wiki so that's why
    I would plead for everyone else
  • 45:32 - 45:35
    to be keeping their work open and on Wiki.
  • 45:35 - 45:38
    (Shani) Yeah and that's the beauty
    of the Wikimedia movement,
  • 45:38 - 45:42
    there's always diversity
    and once you hear someone arguing
  • 45:42 - 45:47
    so passionately about no use of--
    only Wiki, you will find
  • 45:47 - 45:51
    other people as passionate,
    saying that the use of social media
  • 45:51 - 45:54
    is the best thing that could have happened
    because it's helping them
  • 45:54 - 45:57
    engage with students
    in their own platforms
  • 45:57 - 45:59
    in the way that is easy for them.
  • 45:59 - 46:06
    Wiki is notoriously known to not being
    as friendly or the user interface
  • 46:06 - 46:08
    is somewhat lacking.
  • 46:08 - 46:12
    Yeah, but in Germany, Facebook
    is only used by old people.
  • 46:13 - 46:16
    The students are on Instagram.
  • 46:16 - 46:19
    (Shani) It doesn't have to be Facebook
    but you get the idea.
  • 46:19 - 46:21
    Ewan, what about you,
    what has worked for you?
  • 46:22 - 46:26
    Well, the sort of nature of the challenge
    has changed each year.
  • 46:26 - 46:32
    So initially, it was about
    how could we get the good information
  • 46:32 - 46:38
    of access database
    and then model it on Wikidata.
  • 46:38 - 46:42
    So it was all about that
    initial exchange in the first year
  • 46:42 - 46:47
    so there was no sort of PDF handouts
    available to do that.
  • 46:47 - 46:50
    And then the next year it was about
    how can we then enrich the data,
  • 46:50 - 46:54
    working with Google Spreadsheets
    and the Wikidata plug-in
  • 46:54 - 46:56
    and things like that.
  • 46:56 - 47:01
    But and then the final year
    was working with open refine
  • 47:01 - 47:03
    and so like trying to get
    our heads around that
  • 47:03 - 47:06
    about linking their data,
    adding geographical data,
  • 47:06 - 47:08
    then putting it on a website.
  • 47:08 - 47:10
    So again, it was like each year
    it was different.
  • 47:10 - 47:14
    So it was all--always it was getting
  • 47:14 - 47:18
    what stories and engaging tales
  • 47:18 - 47:23
    could be told once we had all that data in
    and we had the visualizations.
  • 47:23 - 47:26
    So the students were always motivated
    when they had that carrot.
  • 47:27 - 47:34
    They weren't always really happy
    with the manual labour aspect
  • 47:34 - 47:38
    to do this, especially when you have
    to get 50 edits on Wikidata
  • 47:38 - 47:42
    to be able to do bulk uploading
    in the first place.
  • 47:42 - 47:43
    That was a challenge.
  • 47:43 - 47:49
    But the main thing that helped
    was having the Wikidata community primed
  • 47:49 - 47:51
    that we were going to do this.
  • 47:51 - 47:55
    And the fact that I had
    knowledgeable people around me
  • 47:55 - 48:01
    that I said, "Could you be available
    so that if we ever have questions--"
  • 48:01 - 48:04
    like Navina Evans and Martin Poulter
  • 48:04 - 48:07
    and Jason Evans as well,
  • 48:07 - 48:11
    and Simon Cobb, we just made sure
    that we had good people around us
  • 48:12 - 48:14
    who knew the things that we needed to know
  • 48:14 - 48:16
    when we needed to know them.
  • 48:16 - 48:19
    But I agree, documentation
    is super important,
  • 48:19 - 48:24
    but there's a number of learning hurdles
    that we were trying to come up against
  • 48:24 - 48:27
    - in a very tight window.
    - (Shani) Yeah.
  • 48:27 - 48:30
    (Shani) Yeah and the fact that
    the tools continue to grow
  • 48:30 - 48:32
    and you have to know everything
    and you have to--
  • 48:32 - 48:34
    like there is so much to learn
    all the time.
  • 48:34 - 48:37
    You have to really keep yourself
  • 48:39 - 48:43
    focused on that, otherwise,
    you'd be doing maybe manual work
  • 48:43 - 48:45
    that there is now a tool
    that you don't know about
  • 48:45 - 48:47
    that is doing it in a much easier way.
  • 48:47 - 48:50
    So connecting, again,
    to the community is important.
  • 48:50 - 48:52
    Do you have final words
    on what worked for you
  • 48:52 - 48:56
    because we have to wrap up very soon.
  • 48:58 - 49:03
    (João) Okay, I guess an important aspect
    of the way I've also worked
  • 49:03 - 49:07
    on the education program
    is to connect it to a larger ecology
  • 49:08 - 49:13
    within the community,
    within the tech development aspect
  • 49:13 - 49:16
    of our community trainings
    through Wikidata labs,
  • 49:16 - 49:19
    it's part of something.
  • 49:19 - 49:25
    So we have Wikimedians in Residence,
    we have the actual community engaging,
  • 49:25 - 49:30
    coming for workshops,
    we set up an agenda for Wikidata live
  • 49:30 - 49:33
    that can actually contribute
    to developing the progress
  • 49:33 - 49:36
    that we want to reach, we developed tools,
  • 49:36 - 49:37
    we do research.
  • 49:37 - 49:41
    So it's enriching to some extent
  • 49:41 - 49:44
    or it's providing a dense experience
  • 49:44 - 49:46
    for the growth of the community.
  • 49:46 - 49:48
    It's a slow process.
  • 49:48 - 49:54
    It's something that needs
    to be engaged, rethink, rethought,
  • 49:54 - 49:58
    that's why this kind of conference
    is so important.
  • 49:58 - 50:00
    We need to be in touch.
  • 50:00 - 50:04
    There is no right way
    to basic experimenting.
  • 50:04 - 50:10
    No one really knows the best way
    how it should be done
  • 50:10 - 50:13
    because no one has actually
    done it before.
  • 50:13 - 50:17
    So we are all experimenting
    and I was--just a something
  • 50:17 - 50:22
    since I have the mic now--
    I was thinking about what Akbar Ali said.
  • 50:23 - 50:27
    The first time that I used Wikipedia
    with high school students,
  • 50:27 - 50:29
    it was a complete failure.
  • 50:29 - 50:32
    I had been very successful
    with Wikipedia assignments
  • 50:32 - 50:33
    with university students.
  • 50:33 - 50:37
    It's just with high school,
    they just didn't get it
  • 50:37 - 50:40
    at the level that we all thought
    we should lead
  • 50:40 - 50:45
    because it was just too hard
    in the process of the critical process.
  • 50:45 - 50:48
    But then I think Wikidata
    is actually a good resource
  • 50:48 - 50:50
    for high school students.
  • 50:50 - 50:55
    So I think that opened-- an eye-opening,
    in your presentation, I think
  • 50:55 - 50:58
    I should go back to this experience.
  • 50:59 - 51:03
    (Shani) So I want to conclude the panel
    by saying first of all,
  • 51:03 - 51:07
    thank you so much to all the panelists
    and not only to them
  • 51:07 - 51:11
    but also to the greater,
    the bigger community
  • 51:11 - 51:14
    of Wikimedians working in education
  • 51:14 - 51:17
    to help evangelize and do this work.
  • 51:17 - 51:23
    And I want to conclude saying
    or reminding rather to us,
  • 51:23 - 51:28
    to our community that
    this is the second Wikidata conference.
  • 51:29 - 51:32
    In the first Wikidata conference,
    we also had an education panel.
  • 51:32 - 51:36
    It was the only education session
    in the conference.
  • 51:36 - 51:39
    And two years have passed,
    so much have been done,
  • 51:40 - 51:46
    so many cool experimenting
    but we still have only one panel
  • 51:46 - 51:48
    in this conference for education.
  • 51:48 - 51:52
    This is not a criticism but rather for me
    an eye-opening moment
  • 51:52 - 51:56
    to realize that we are still
    at the very beginning stages
  • 51:56 - 52:00
    of showing our impact
    and why this is important
  • 52:00 - 52:04
    to the bigger Wikimedia community
    and I look at every--
  • 52:04 - 52:08
    each and every one of you sitting here
    and listening at home
  • 52:08 - 52:12
    as people who can now go
    and do it yourselves
  • 52:12 - 52:16
    and experimenting and connecting
    with the community,
  • 52:16 - 52:19
    talking about the challenges
    sharing best practices,
  • 52:19 - 52:23
    sharing resources is basically
    the way to go
  • 52:23 - 52:25
    so go experiment.
  • 52:25 - 52:27
    Wikidata is amazing.
  • 52:27 - 52:32
    It's such a unique tool to teach
    all sorts of things, right
  • 52:32 - 52:37
    from data completion
    to showing, to being able to show
  • 52:37 - 52:40
    the gender gap
    and knowledge gaps in general
  • 52:40 - 52:42
    in a visualized and cool way.
  • 52:42 - 52:45
    It is an educational tool.
  • 52:45 - 52:49
    So use it and hopefully
    by the next Wiki Data Con,
  • 52:49 - 52:52
    we're going to see
    a bunch of other sessions
  • 52:52 - 52:57
    and I would-- just to say one more thing
    and I know João has to run
  • 52:57 - 53:00
    to the next session--about GLAM.
  • 53:00 - 53:04
    Use GLAM, use libraries,
    work with the low-hanging fruit
  • 53:04 - 53:07
    which is the lecturers
    who are already teaching Semantic Web
  • 53:07 - 53:11
    and you can use this in a way
    that makes sense.
  • 53:11 - 53:15
    They're your best friends--
    libraries, especially, will help you.
  • 53:17 - 53:18
    Hey.
    (chuckles)
  • 53:18 - 53:22
    Hello--Libraries will definitely help you
    in academic institutions,
  • 53:22 - 53:25
    usually there are libraries,
    work with the libraries to help
  • 53:25 - 53:28
    disseminate an idea to the faculty,
    to the students.
  • 53:28 - 53:32
    This will probably be the things
    that will spark the idea
  • 53:32 - 53:33
    for some lecturer to try it
  • 53:33 - 53:36
    and we will then
    conquer the world together.
  • 53:36 - 53:41
    - (audience 3) [inaudible]
    - (Shani) Yes.
  • 53:41 - 53:45
    [inaudible]
  • 53:45 - 53:47
    but so I'm a librarian
    and I wanted to know.
  • 53:47 - 53:53
    But one idea is for one-off lessons
    instead of like semester-long
  • 53:53 - 53:57
    or a quarter-long because I tend to--
    I try to do more data literacy
  • 53:57 - 53:58
    with students.
  • 53:58 - 54:04
    And also how to get into faculties
    or your colleagues' brains
  • 54:04 - 54:05
    that this is great?
  • 54:05 - 54:08
    (Shani) João, can you give
    the mic to Ewan.
  • 54:09 - 54:13
    We will release João who has to run
    but we will take more,
  • 54:13 - 54:15
    five more minutes of questions.
  • 54:15 - 54:16
    Just really quick then.
  • 54:16 - 54:20
    So yeah, so it's like Martin Poulter
  • 54:20 - 54:23
    is running how to make
    a SPARQL query workshop fun
  • 54:23 - 54:25
    later this afternoon.
  • 54:25 - 54:27
    - And I would start with that.
    - (audience 3) Yeah.
  • 54:27 - 54:31
    Because it's like you were saying,
    it's about understanding
  • 54:31 - 54:37
    this sort of like how they can visualize
    the data story there intially
  • 54:37 - 54:41
    and work with simple SPARQL queries
    build them up and do much more.
  • 54:41 - 54:43
    That could be done quite simply
    in one workshop.
  • 54:43 - 54:45
    (audience 3) Yeah, that's how I do
    my workshops.
  • 54:45 - 54:47
    I do them like, okay,
    somebody has a question.
  • 54:47 - 54:50
    I'm like, okay, what are the--
    all of the people who won this award
  • 54:50 - 54:52
    and then we do that query
    and then we see all the gaps.
  • 54:52 - 54:55
    And so then let's fill in all these gaps.
  • 54:55 - 54:57
    And that's how I tend to do
    these workshops,
  • 54:57 - 55:00
    but it's completely over their head.
    (chuckles)
  • 55:00 - 55:02
    (Shani) Just continue, you know.
  • 55:02 - 55:06
    Be vigilant and continue to doing it,
    continue doing the workshops
  • 55:06 - 55:11
    and at one point,
    someone will see the light.
  • 55:11 - 55:16
    And visualization is probably the best way
    to show impact, right.
  • 55:16 - 55:19
    So you're on the right direction
    it sounds.
  • 55:19 - 55:20
    Just go for it.
  • 55:20 - 55:25
    (audience 4) [inaudible]
    I didn't really know Wikipedia Adventure
  • 55:25 - 55:28
    then if you can make
    a Wikidata Adventure then
  • 55:28 - 55:32
    - that would be super cool to introduce.
    - (Shani) Well, we have Wikidata games.
  • 55:32 - 55:35
    - (Shani) So we can use those.
    - (audience 4) Yeah, yeah.
  • 55:35 - 55:39
    - (Shani) But we have to conclude.
    - (Debora) We're making Wikidata games.
  • 55:39 - 55:41
    (Shani) You're all welcome to talk to us.
  • 55:42 - 55:43
    Later on, thank you.
  • 55:43 - 55:45
    (applause)
Title:
cdn.media.ccc.de/.../wikidatacon2019-7-eng-Education_panel_hd.mp4
Video Language:
English
Duration:
55:56

English subtitles

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