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36C3 - Fairtronics

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    36c3 preroll music
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    Herald-Engel: ...three persons here to
    announce, there is Andreas and if I'm
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    right, Sebastian, and if I'm right,
    because I have the code names, of course,
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    Tamara. In their presentation, they have
    their real names. Something like that.
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    Okay, their presentation is actually about
    a tool and we all know that we use
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    electronic gadgets everywhere and but we
    are not aware about what actually the
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    human cost is of all these things. And
    they are developing a tool that shows us
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    this information. And it could probably
    and hopefully help us a lot in defining
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    what things we're going to use in our
    daily life. I want you to give them a
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    welcome applause. Please, go ahead.
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    Applause
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    Sebastian: Good morning. Thanks for
    getting up early and coming here. I'm
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    really grateful for that. I'm Sebastian,
    this is Tamara, this is Andreas. And we
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    are building a tool, a software tool for
    easy supply chain risk analysis. And I
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    will start by talking about the background
    of all this, what kind of risks we analyze
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    and why. Andreas will talk more about how
    we do the analysis and then Tamara will
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    talk about our Project Fairtronics. So the
    first thing I want to do is unpack this
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    slogan a little bit. Supply chain is
    basically all the steps that happen to a
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    product before it is a product, right. It
    starts with resource extraction and then
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    somehow components are being made or
    assembled. And at the end you have maybe a
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    mobile phone or an arduino or something
    like that. And when you're doing supply
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    chain, when you work with supply chains,
    basically, you have to acknowledge that
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    electronics production happens all around
    the globe. So that's a major thing that
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    makes it complicated. Risk in the sense of
    social risk. So what we want to do is
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    minimize harm that is caused to people
    involved in the production of electronics
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    devices. Analysis in the sense that we
    compute it. So we have a computational
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    model of what kind of harms, risks are in
    the supply chain of a product. And the
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    whole thing is supposed to be easy and
    easy is meant in the sense that you do not
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    need to collect extra data. If you are
    designing an electronic product the tool
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    should work only with the data you already
    have. As I said, supply chains are global,
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    making electronics products is a global
    affair. Basically, anything, any any
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    product you can think of would probably
    involve 45 continents such as this
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    smartphone here, which is a pretty typical
    case. It basically starts with resource
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    extraction at the blue green dots and
    resources or like, yeah, raw materials are
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    located all around the globe. So they come
    from South America, North America, Africa,
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    Asia and so on. And then processing and
    manufacturing happens in a lot of other
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    places. So basically the material for any
    product is shipped around the globe like,
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    like crazy. And the background of our work
    is essentially sustainability. You may
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    have heard of this model of sustainability
    that just made up of three pillars, the
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    social pillar, the environmental pillar
    and the economic pillar. And, you know,
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    many people associate sustainability
    mainly with the environmental aspect,
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    making things ecological, not emitting too
    much CO2 and so on. And that sometimes
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    leads to the social aspect of
    sustainability being a little bit
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    underrepresented. Social sustainability
    means avoiding harm, you know, improving
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    people's well-being and so on. And that is
    exactly the aspect that is most important
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    to our work. So what about the social
    sustainability of electronic supply
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    chains? Basically, you know, across all
    the stages of a supply chain, you can find
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    a whole huge catalog of human rights
    violations and other problems that are
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    associated with the making of electronics
    products from having to work in dangerous
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    conditions, for instance, being poisoned
    by toxic chemicals or being harmed in, you
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    know, when the safety precautions are not
    not sufficient. Being forced to work, for
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    instance, because people are in so much
    debt that they need to repay. Children
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    having to work, people not being able to
    form unions. Having to work too many hours
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    or not making a living wage, even though
    people work, you know, 10 or 12 hours or
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    more a day. Being displaced from one's
    home. For instance, when mines are being
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    established or extended and it frequently
    happens that people that have been living
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    there are forced to move. From being
    discriminated against or not enjoying
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    Social Security, such as, you know, being
    able to take time off when you are sick.
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    For instance, in gold mining, many of
    these cases are well documented, child
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    labor happens in very, very many places.
    And also you may be aware that mercury is
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    frequently used to extract gold, when gold
    is being mined. And of course, mercury is
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    toxic and sometimes, you know, safety
    precautions are not taken and people get
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    poisoned and the environment gets
    poisoned. So these are just two simple
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    examples to make it a bit more plastic.
    And the big picture is that the
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    digitalisation, which we enjoy and
    celebrate here at Congress happens on the
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    backs of the people who make these
    electronics. So how can we fix that? I
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    want to go through three example steps,
    you know, three puzzle pieces of the
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    solution. The first one is that there do
    exist some certifications that rule out
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    certain human rights violations. For
    instance, you know, the fair trade lable
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    from bananas or coffee or whatever. And
    there exists a fair trade certification
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    for gold. There also exists another
    certification, fair mind also for gold.
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    And, yeah, these do rule out a good part
    of these human rights violations. There is
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    another standard, Irma, which is in the
    process of being established, which
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    applies to more metals or more materials
    that come from mining. But the problem
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    with all these certifications is that they
    are not broadly available. So in each case
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    there only exist a few mines that have a
    certification and most of the mines don't.
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    So another way to put this is that there
    does not seem to be a huge demand for
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    certified metals at the moment. And I
    think that is like one of the things that
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    need to change. A second example is that
    when you are the designer of an electronic
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    product, of course you get to decide what
    goes into that product and you make a lot
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    of design decisions. And of course, these
    decisions determine what kind of raw
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    materials are needed to build your
    product. So this is a fun little example.
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    This is a DIY mobile phone. So this phone
    was built in a fab lab. And at the back of
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    the phone, you see these two little knobs
    sticking out. And these little knobs are
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    capacitors. They are aluminium capacitors
    because the person who built this phone
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    did not want to use tantalum capacitors
    because tantalum is well known to be
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    associated with the whole catalog of human
    rights problems. So, yeah, here you can
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    very clearly see this design tradeoff
    between making the phone a little bit
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    thinner or avoiding the use of certain
    resources. Many metals can be recycled,
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    not all metals do get recycled because
    it's not always cost effective. But of
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    course, when it's being done and when it's
    possible, recycling is a good way to
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    reduce the overall amount of resources
    that are being extracted. Why is it not
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    always cost effective? I think this is,
    again, partly a matter of supply and
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    demand. You know, when there is a larger
    demand for recycled metals, I hope you
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    come cost effective to recycle a larger
    amount of them. So the general message is
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    there do exist alternatives, but then the
    question is why, you know, why do I keep
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    telling you there's no demand? Why is
    there no demand? Why do not all people,
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    you know, try to source their materials
    responsibly? And part of the answer is
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    that electronic supply chains are very
    complex and very deep.
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    This is a supply chain taken from the
    Naga I.T. project, a very nice product,
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    which is also a pioneering project in
    fair electronics. And they tried to build
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    the most sustainable computer mouse
    possible. So they took the mouse because
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    it's a very simple product. And they tried
    to map out their entire supply chain
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    as far as possible. And you can see that
    even for the simple product, basically,
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    the supply chain chart is overwhelming.
    And you as a designer or as a maker of
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    an electronic product, you are basically
    at the top of the supply chain and you
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    kind of have to look backwards and see
    what your suppliers are and what are
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    their suppliers and so on. And with with
    this huge amount of steps, it's very
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    difficult to know where to start. And
    this is where our tool comes in.
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    And Andi will now tell you a bit more
    about how that works.
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    Andreas: Okay, thank you. So, we have
    learned now that, there exist severe
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    issues in the production of electronics
    devices, severe social issues. We want to
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    do something about this. But we have also
    seen right now that it is not an easy
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    task, that it is complex, that supply
    chains for electronics products are
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    complex and deep. And so the question is
    where can we start? And one thing that we
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    or that someone as a designer of
    electronics products does know is the
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    components that go into an electronics
    products, for example, here, the computer
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    mouse. You can see it's made from the
    casing. There's the cable. There's the
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    circuit board. There are resistors that go
    into it and so this is one thing that we
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    know. And so the idea for our tool is that
    you can feed this component list, maybe
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    half a bill of materials available, maybe
    you can just disassemble a device, feed it
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    into our fairtronics tool and get a
    hotspot analysis that tells you where is
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    the highest risk, where are the hotspots
    for social issues in your device?
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    So how could this be done? And I will walk
    with you through some steps to make
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    this more tangible. Like I said, one
    component in our computer mouse is the
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    resistor. And if we take the resistor, we
    can start collecting generic data, what
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    the resistor is made of. There is some
    copper part of the resistor, there is some
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    iron part of the resistor. And one example
    for a data source that you can see here is
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    from an environmental assessment of
    generic or average electronics components.
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    And what you can see here listed is the
    materials that an average resistor
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    consists of in weight. For example, copper
    it is made of 61.71 % of copper or 12.49 %
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    of iron in weight, an average resistor
    that we see here. OK. So now we know
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    something about the composition of one
    component and when we follow that trail
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    and say, okay a large part of our of our
    component is copper, we can ask where does
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    the copper come from? And here's another
    example of a data source that tells us
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    something about this. It's from the US
    Geological Survey and they publish yearly
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    estimates about the global production of
    different minerals. And you can see that
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    in 2018, Chile produced a 5.8 million tons
    of copper, or Congo produced 1.2 million
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    tons of copper in 2018. These are
    estimates based on publications from
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    different firms or governments about their
    copper production. Okay. So we can assume
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    a certain amount of the copper that flows
    into our component, into the resistor,
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    comes from Congo. And now we can ask, how
    are the working conditions in Congo? Are
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    people getting fair salary there? How long
    do they have to work? Is there child labor
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    possibly involved? Is there forced labor
    possibly involved in Congo? And there you
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    can all find quite some data on this
    country level that tells you something
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    about working conditions in different
    countries. And also our observation is
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    that the situation is improving here. But
    the data quality that you get since
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    especially since the U.N. sustainability
    goals were established, you can find more
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    and more better quality data about social
    conditions, working conditions in
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    different countries. And here's one
    example from the International Labor
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    Organization. They also publish a report
    on estimates about, in this case, the work
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    and poverty rate. So the share of people
    that do work, that still live below the
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    poverty line. And in this case we are
    interested in Congo and see, okay, this
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    rate is 70%, 70% of the people in
    employment still don't have enough to
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    live. And a huge part of our work is to
    collect this data, to collect data about
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    raw material composition of electronics
    components, to collect data about
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    production rates of these raw materials in
    different countries, and to collect data
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    about the indicators that tell us
    something about the working conditions in
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    these countries, bring them in a common
    format and collect them in our database.
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    And as soon as we have this data, we can
    start asking some questions and do some
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    basic computations. For example, we might
    be interested in the significance of
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    copper produced in Congo. Well, when we
    say, okay, Congo's share in world
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    production of copper is 5.81% and the
    share of copper in our resistor weight is
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    61.71%, we arrive at 3.58% and we could
    interpret this as something like medium
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    activity. So anything we can say, okay,
    around 3.58% of copper in our resistor we
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    can assume stems from Congo and well, it's
    between 1 and 10%, so quite significant,
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    it is medium activity, quite important for
    our resistor. Anything that is more than
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    10% would be high activity. Anything below
    1% would be low activity just to
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    qualify this a bit. And then how severe
    are the impacts in Congo if we take our
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    example of fair salary? We have that
    example of working poverty rate of 70%,
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    which is among the top 25% of rates for
    all the countries that we have for this
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    indicator. And this is just one
    qualification that you can make at this
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    point and say, okay, anything that is, any
    rate that is among these top 25% of rates
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    is high impact. And if we do this for our
    whole product, for the computer mouse, we
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    can actually see that copper is not only
    the most prevalent metal in the resistor,
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    but for the whole computer mouse, mainly
    due to the cable. So well, copper is quite
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    prevalent in our computer mouse and we
    also identified a social hotspot from the
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    data that we just had, that is the copper
    extraction in Congo and the impact
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    category that we looked at is fair salary.
    And one interpretation from this analysis
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    would be, okay, if we find a source of
    fair copper, of certified copper for the
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    cable or find some producer of cables that
    is willing to work with us in improving
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    the situation, that would be a big step
    forward for the fairness of the computer
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    mouse. Now, there are some limitations
    from this approach that I would like to
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    point you to. For one, it's an assessment
    on a very generic level. So you should
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    take this with a grain of salt. It's just
    to highlight hotspots, to highlight those
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    areas where it's worth looking deeper and
    try to identify the real issues that lie
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    behind this. In the whole approach, we
    follow a methodology called Social
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    Lifecycle Assessment, which is similar to
    environmental assessments of products. So
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    you look at the whole supply chain or the
    whole lifecycle of a product and in an
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    environmental assessment, you are
    interested in the CO2 emissions or in the
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    water use that happens during the whole
    lifecycle. And in our case, we have just
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    different impact categories. So the impact
    category is not water use or CO2
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    emissions, but direct social impacts and
    that these are the ones that we are
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    focusing on. So anything related to
    workers, freedom of association, working
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    hours, forced labor, health and safety,
    Social Security, equal opportunities,
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    child labor and fair salary. And also, as
    you can see from the example, we are
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    focusing right now just on the raw
    material extraction phase and the future.
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    This should be extended also to cover
    other lifecycle phases to get to a full
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    assessment, social assessment. Okay, now I
    will pass on to Tamara, who will tell you
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    more about our project and the tool that
    we are developing.
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    Tamara: So thank you. Now that Sebastian
    already told you why we are working on
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    this project and Andi you told you how we
    are doing this, I like to show you a bit
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    of what we've done already. So we're
    building a web based analysis tool to
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    identify social hotspots. You can see a
    screenshot of the current work in progress
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    of it. It should be, an MVP should be done
    by the end of February. And to revisit
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    that example for the computer mouse, here
    you can see that the component that you
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    should look at first is the data cable,
    and then that if you find a sustainably
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    sourced or fair copper for your product,
    that would be a significant improvement.
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    And now you maybe all wonder if that is
    really great and how can I contribute to
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    it? So first of all, to all the makers of
    electronic products. It would be great if
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    you let us know what kind of tools you
    currently use, in what formats you export.
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    You could just send us your bill of
    material list or PCB layout so we can
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    offer templates because we want it to be
    really easy to use. And the other thing is
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    just use our tool by the end of February.
    Give us feedback. Tell us what
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    functionalities are working for you,
    whether or not. And another thing is we're
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    an open source project, we'd love to
    collaborate. So if you have time on your
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    hands and you're motivated and or
    passionate for the subject, just join us.
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    And you can find us on gitlab, here's the
    link. A very crucial matter is the
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    procurement of data. Without data we
    cannot conduct an analysis and our current
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    database is rather tiny and a lot of
    manual labor went into it. And even though
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    there have been significant improvements
    concerning open source data for social
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    indicators it's still not in a
    standardised format to feed them into a
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    coherent system quickly. And another thing
    is the raw materials that constitute
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    components, there it's even harder to find
    something. So if you're in possession of
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    data, if you're probably a manufacturer
    and you have lists or if you just love to
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    extract data in an automated way, yeah,
    let us know. And the last thing is talk
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    about it. So even if you're not a maker
    yourself. Yeah, like spread the word, talk
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    with people about it. And the more people
    know and think about it, hopefully, the
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    more can be done and if it's at a bare
    minimum more conscience towards this
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    topic. And to wrap up this talk, I'd like
    to reiterate what Sebastian said in the
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    beginning. Currently in the production of
    electronic products, human rights are
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    violated at almost every step of the
    supply chain and this must not be the
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    case. And this does not have to be the
    case, as he said earlier. There are
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    alternatives. You can use certified raw
    materials, you can use, materials from
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    certified mines. You can actively take
    working conditions into consideration in
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    the design process and you can use
    recycled material if possible. But most
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    importantly, you can increase the demand
    for sustainably sourced raw materials and
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    a fair production of electronic products.
    And here's also our contact information.
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    So feel free to write us an email or
    you're here, we're here, you can come and
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    talk to us. And I'd also like to thank the
    prototype fund at this point because they
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    have been funding us so far. And that was
    a great help. Yes. Thank you. And thank
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    you for your attention, your interest and
    your time.
  • 26:29 - 26:31
    Applause
  • 26:31 - 26:42
    Herald-Engel: Super! Thank you! Wow! You
    can be really proud about your product,
  • 26:42 - 26:47
    really. I wonder if there are questions
    here among our audience who is really
  • 26:47 - 27:00
    clearly woken up and fresh. And to the
    point, ah here at number two. Yes, please!
  • 27:00 - 27:06
    Mic2: Is it on? Okay. Collecting data is a
    difficult task, as you just said. So I
  • 27:06 - 27:11
    wanted to ask if you share it with other
    databases like Wikidata or another open
  • 27:11 - 27:17
    data source, or if you like only keep it
    to yourself because it's too hard to
  • 27:17 - 27:22
    actually connect to other data sources?
    Andreas: Well, technically, we're working
  • 27:22 - 27:29
    on,... to have a REST interface for the
    data that we collect and we happily
  • 27:29 - 27:35
    share it. For some we are not sure if we
    are allowed to share them. So if there is
  • 27:35 - 27:41
    some expert here concerned property rights
    of databases, that would be great to talk
  • 27:41 - 27:47
    about them. But we happily share the data
    that we can. And if you want to connect
  • 27:47 - 27:50
    here, great!
    Mic2: Okay. Thank you.
  • 27:50 - 27:55
    Herald-Engel: Here, Number one.
    Mic1: Thanks a lot for the presentation
  • 27:55 - 28:00
    and I'll probably send you some bill of
    materials, too. I've got one question. I
  • 28:00 - 28:07
    know that Fairlötet offers the Stannol
    soldering tin. But do you also plan to
  • 28:07 - 28:12
    offer a solder paste? Because for all SMD
    assembly obviously it's not possible to
  • 28:12 - 28:21
    use that Fairlötet product.
    Sebastian: Yeah, okay, so for context,
  • 28:21 - 28:27
    basically that was our inaugural project
    at Fairlötet. We are an association that
  • 28:27 - 28:34
    works on fair electronics. And yeah,
    basically the first project we did was we
  • 28:34 - 28:40
    got together with Stannol, which is a
    maker of soda products, and designed a
  • 28:40 - 28:50
    soda wire. So what you would use when you
    have your soda...iron and...So I would
  • 28:50 - 28:58
    suggest that you get in contact with
    Stannol directly. Actually, we are not so
  • 28:58 - 29:04
    much involved in distributing this order
    anymore.
  • 29:04 - 29:13
    Herald-Engel: Number one, can you repeat
    the question, please?
  • 29:13 - 29:19
    Mic1: So there is no product on the market
    at the moment what you can recommend for
  • 29:19 - 29:22
    soldering paste?
    Sebastian: Stannol do have their own
  • 29:22 - 29:31
    product line they call Fairtin. So that is
    tin with a traceable origin, following
  • 29:31 - 29:36
    best practices in mining. So that might be
    an option for you.
  • 29:36 - 29:40
    Herald-Engel. Okay, we have a question at
    number two.
  • 29:40 - 29:47
    Mic2: Thank you, you hear me? Thank you
    very much for your talk. I was wondering,
  • 29:47 - 29:54
    have you gotten in contact with purchasing
    organizations, because in supply chains
  • 29:54 - 30:02
    nowadays you often have a service provider
    that is in between the producer who buys
  • 30:02 - 30:15
    these products and the vendors. And often
    these purchasing service providers are
  • 30:15 - 30:30
    asked to help control the supply chain.
    Sebastian: We haven't actually and to be
  • 30:30 - 30:33
    honest, I think we need to start at the
    point where there's some kind of momentum
  • 30:33 - 30:38
    and for us I think it's easier to reach
    people like you. You know, maybe hardware
  • 30:38 - 30:47
    developers or maybe small enterprises or
    maybe just activists because, I mean, I
  • 30:47 - 30:51
    cannot really make really broad
    statements, but I think big parts of the
  • 30:51 - 30:55
    whole industry are kind of conservative
    when it comes to stuff like
  • 30:55 - 30:59
    sustainability. And we kind of have to
    work our way through there, I think.
  • 30:59 - 31:06
    Herald-Engel: Okay, we have a question.
    Number three there. One second. Yes,
  • 31:06 - 31:10
    please. Number three.
    Mic3: First of all, thank you for your
  • 31:10 - 31:18
    talk, and my question is, you used a
    relative approach regarding the evaluation
  • 31:18 - 31:22
    of the impact category. And I was
    wondering if there was a specific reason
  • 31:22 - 31:30
    for that or if, I mean, you could have
    instead just evaluated the absolute value
  • 31:30 - 31:35
    by which you compare the different
    countries of origin.
  • 31:35 - 31:40
    Andreas: You mean to have some kind of
    reference point and say, okay, it's better
  • 31:40 - 31:45
    or worse and than this reference point.
    The approach that I showed you right now
  • 31:45 - 31:52
    is our starting point where we are
    following some well, an approach that or
  • 31:52 - 31:56
    modeling after approach that we found in
    literature. And that seems doable for us
  • 31:56 - 32:01
    right now within the six month timeframe
    that we have to arrive at a full
  • 32:01 - 32:06
    prototype. But it's not fixed. So
    certainly the whole methodology can still
  • 32:06 - 32:12
    be improved. So, yeah, that's pretty much
    what I can say to that.
  • 32:12 - 32:16
    Mic3: Thank you.
    Herald-Engel: Fine. Thank you. Yes, sir,
  • 32:16 - 32:20
    please.
    Mic: Hello. My question also concerns the
  • 32:20 - 32:26
    relative impact approach that analyzes,
    for example with the mouse which
  • 32:26 - 32:31
    countries and which materials from these
    countries had an impact. And I was also
  • 32:31 - 32:37
    wondering if except for the country of
    origin and its world market share and also
  • 32:37 - 32:42
    the share of weight in the product, as you
    showed with copper, if you're also taking
  • 32:42 - 32:49
    into consideration other factors, for
    example, the rarity and different impacts
  • 32:49 - 32:55
    of materials, for example, copper being
    more common than tantalum, as you
  • 32:55 - 33:00
    mentioned, and if you would consider
    adding that as an additional factor into
  • 33:00 - 33:06
    your analysis.
    Andreas: Right now, we do not consider it.
  • 33:06 - 33:10
    But one could certainly think about it.
    Maybe we can talk about later about this
  • 33:10 - 33:17
    idea, would be great.
    Herald-Engel: It's fine. Do we have
  • 33:17 - 33:22
    questions online? No one. We're all
    asleep. I see someone here at number two.
  • 33:22 - 33:25
    Please Sir.
    Mic2: Hi there. I'm also a prototype fund
  • 33:25 - 33:29
    recipient. It's really, really cool to see
    them doing all this nice and this awesome
  • 33:29 - 33:34
    stuff. I am a happy fair phone owner. And
    I also have another non fair phone and the
  • 33:34 - 33:38
    fairphone was twice the price of the other
    one. And whenever I ask people or they ask
  • 33:38 - 33:42
    me, which one should I get? I say like,
    well do you wanna spend twice, that's
  • 33:42 - 33:46
    where you have to get yourself into. In
    the fact that, in the face that we have
  • 33:46 - 33:50
    this failure market wise, do you see any
    role for regulation to actually make it
  • 33:50 - 33:54
    easier for people who build things like
    this to do the right thing? Because when
  • 33:54 - 33:58
    you speak to small businesses, the thing
    that I always have pushed back at me is
  • 33:58 - 34:03
    that we cannot make them viable at these
    prices. So we're forced to use over the
  • 34:03 - 34:09
    non fair parts in our electronics.
    Sebastian: So concerning regulations,
  • 34:09 - 34:14
    yesterday I gave a lightning talk on the
    Lieferkettengesetz, right now there's a
  • 34:14 - 34:20
    broad NGO campaign going on that is trying
    to establish mandatory human rights due
  • 34:20 - 34:26
    diligence in Germany. But also there are
    initiatives in other countries such as
  • 34:26 - 34:31
    Switzerland. France already has a supply
    chain law and so on. And there are also
  • 34:31 - 34:37
    some processes on the EU and U.N. levels.
    So, I think that is,... I mean, but that
  • 34:37 - 34:41
    is basically the bare minimum, right? I
    mean, not violating human rights should
  • 34:41 - 34:49
    actually not be something great. It should
    be, you know, it should be something
  • 34:49 - 34:56
    everyone does. Yeah.
    Herald-Engel: That's absolutely the point
  • 34:56 - 35:05
    actually, in our lifestyle, western world
    hooked up to electronics and yeah, we
  • 35:05 - 35:12
    can't live without it. But I had a
    question as well, if you...Ah there is
  • 35:12 - 35:16
    another one. I have a question. But number
    three, please, you can.
  • 35:16 - 35:20
    Mic: I have a question about the lack of
    data. You said you need more data and you
  • 35:20 - 35:27
    asked for data sheets of parts. But I
    think you also need more data about metals
  • 35:27 - 35:35
    or working conditions. Do you have the top
    three data what you would appreciate based
  • 35:35 - 35:41
    on the metals or on the working conditions
    in countries, for example? Probably we can
  • 35:41 - 35:49
    provide you with that.
    Andreas: Oh, it would be hard to tell
  • 35:49 - 35:54
    something about the top three. It's just,
    well, right now we are at a state where we
  • 35:54 - 36:02
    think, okay, on a very generic level, we
    can cover most of the minerals that are
  • 36:02 - 36:08
    relevant. We can cover most of the
    countries. But most of the indicators, for
  • 36:08 - 36:13
    the indicators, there is still a lot of
    gaps. Well, maybe you can find an
  • 36:13 - 36:17
    indicator for child labor but it covers
    only 20 countries and not all of the
  • 36:17 - 36:28
    countries. So on this level, on a very
    generic level, we are quite complete. But
  • 36:28 - 36:35
    then a good next step, for example, would
    be to get data that is more specific to
  • 36:35 - 36:39
    industries and not only on a country
    level. So that would be great. In general,
  • 36:39 - 36:43
    it's just well, we need more of
    everything.
  • 36:43 - 36:48
    Tamara: And also components and what raw
    materials they constitute.
  • 36:48 - 36:55
    Andreas: So yeah, as Tamara just said, the
    component composition is the more severe
  • 36:55 - 36:57
    lack that we have right now.
    Tamara: So the more generic it is, the
  • 36:57 - 37:04
    less accurate it is.
    Herald-Engel: May I? I have a question as
  • 37:04 - 37:09
    well. We still have a few minutes left.
    Did you mention how you're financed or
  • 37:09 - 37:14
    backed or... did you do that?
    Tamara: I think I did. I'm not sure of
  • 37:14 - 37:19
    it but there's also the logo.
    Herald-Engel: And this brings you til
  • 37:19 - 37:25
    which stage, meaning til the product is
    there or is there something in the future
  • 37:25 - 37:32
    waiting?
    Tamara: Til the end of February this
  • 37:32 - 37:37
    round, round it is called, is finished. So
    we want to have a minimal viable product
  • 37:37 - 37:44
    type at that point. But I think all of us
    would be happy to see more of that in the
  • 37:44 - 37:47
    future.
    Sebastian: Right, so basically the period
  • 37:47 - 37:53
    where we're being funded by prototype fund
    is almost over, it's until February. But
  • 37:53 - 37:58
    Fairlötet will try to keep the project
    going as best as possible. So we're also
  • 37:58 - 38:02
    trying to build a small developer
    community around it. And let's see what
  • 38:02 - 38:05
    happens then.
    Herald-Engel: Yeah. And so spread the
  • 38:05 - 38:10
    words, I would say, so that you have more
    data as well in your database before the
  • 38:10 - 38:16
    end of February. So I would ask everyone
    to give a warm applause and remember, give
  • 38:16 - 38:21
    them the data and they can bring it
    further. Thank you. Thank you guys for the
  • 38:21 - 38:26
    talk. Fantastic. Fairtronics.org, check it
    out!
  • 38:26 - 38:28
    Applause
  • 38:28 - 38:30
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  • 38:30 - 38:35
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Title:
36C3 - Fairtronics
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