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Trouble #24 - Organize: For Autonomy & Mutual Aid

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    Modern industrial civilization is an astonishing
    testament to the power and capacity of organization.
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    The world that we inhabit today is the product
    of countless generations of planning, innovation
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    and collective human activity, harnessed and
    channelled towards the ceaseless pursuit of
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    productivity and growth.
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    Every day, the global economy structures and
    coordinates the labour of billions of people.
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    A dizzying array of commodities are engineered,
    manufactured, transported to regional distribution
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    centres and shipped out to retail outlets
    and people’s doorsteps all around the world.
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    International supply chains cut across borders
    and continents, connecting garment workers
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    in Ho Chi Min City, Vietnam to Wal-Mart shoppers
    in Scottsdale, Arizona.
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    Within this interconnected system, each metropolis forms a teeming hub of activity made up of dozens of
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    neighborhoods. These distinct regions are linked together by an intricately designed maze of
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    transportation and telecommunication
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    infrastructure, as well as the electrical,
    water and sewage grids that help ensure the
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    sanitation and daily survival of millions
    of people.
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    And yet despite all the meticulous planning
    and the vast quantities of human skill and
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    toil marshalled towards its execution, more
    than a billion people live in squalid, overcrowded
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    slums, favelas and makeshift refugee camps
    – many of which lack basic access to electricity
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    or running water. This growing population
    draws little benefit from the way society is organized.
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    And this is by design as their impoverishment and desperation is integral to the machine's
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    smooth functioning.To the architects of progress, they are the grease that keeps the gears moving.
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    The same could be said, to varying degrees,
    for the entirety of the global working class,
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    particularly migrant labourers and all those
    working in the informal, low-wage sectors
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    of the so-called “gig economy”. Because
    this world is not organized around the principle
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    of satisfying people’s needs, but around
    the endless accumulation of capital.
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    This organizational imperative is firmly rooted
    in ruling-class institutions and in the ideologies
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    and structural violence that underpin them.
    This dynamic means that sweeping social transformations
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    are contingent on political crises that can
    shake and ultimately uproot the entire social
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    order. Yet even when this sort of revolutionary
    change may seem far off, it’s always possible
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    to change our conditions for the better. This
    is where autonomous, grass-roots organizing comes in.
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    Over the next thirty minutes, we’ll take
    a closer look at what this sort of organizing
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    looks like for anarchists. Along the way,
    we’ll talk to a number of individuals as
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    they share their own experiences of bringing
    people together, coming up with strategies,
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    hitting the streets... and making a whole
    lot of trouble.
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    When we're talking about organzing, we're
    essentially talking about weaponizing human
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    relatonships. The relationships that you and I
    and people in our broader community that are
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    affected by things, that live together, that
    work together, that go to school together..
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    Weaponizing those relationships, and then
    using those relationships to go out and do
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    something and figuring out how people can
    physically put themselves together as material force.
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    With that in mind, it's important to understand
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    that this takes time, it takes a lot of trust,
    a lot of love, a lot of passion. It takes
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    time for folks to kind of come together and
    to start pinpointing what are the issues,
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    what are the struggles here within my neighborhood,
    within my community?
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    Organizing is, it's a process of building
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    up your collective strength and your collective power
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    The first step of organizing is to sort of
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    break through that social barrier and isolation
    that divides us and often this can be as simple
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    as getting a bunch of people into a room together
    and starting to talk about the things that
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    we have in common, the problems that we share,
    and from there through the course of talking
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    about these things we start to come to the
    realization that by working together we're
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    in a better position to change things. Organizing
    is a process that should be transformative.
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    During the process of organizing
    new bonds of solidarity are formed through
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    the course of struggle.
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    I think the first thing is to
    find a group of people,
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    a community,
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    or people in your area
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    that have a conflict in common.
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    And based on that conflict,
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    to agree to organize among
    these people to achieve an objective.
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    Organizing is more of an approach to engaging in struggle
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    People talk about organizing and being an organizer more related to building relationships with
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    people and focusing on specific groups of people, it could be tenants or students or workers.
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    But in this case the central focus is more on building those relationships
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    Rather than just on one singular issue and often working to like build power with those people
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    "After every anarchist attack, a wordy communique - Anarchist graffiti - A Greek anarchist group has attacked
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    - an anarchist group - anarchist community - these are anarchists!"
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    I think there are a variety of different characteristics that differentiate anarchist organizing from other
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    types of organizing. I think some
    of them entail the scope of the type of organizing
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    anarchists engage in. I think by default of
    being an increadibly diverse politics that has
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    a critique of domination and systems of power
    that is so total, means that anarchists focus
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    on a very broad range of different issues
    and organize amongst many different people.
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    What distinguishes anarchist organizing primarily
    is the goals of that organizing. So, it's
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    the type of world that anarchists are trying
    to bring about. Anarchists oppose states and
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    capitalism and all forms of illegitimate authority.
    So, the process of anarchist organizing is
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    one that builds opposition to the insitutions,
    groups and individuals that reproduce these
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    forms of hierarchy in society.
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    Anarchists engage in a really wide spectrum
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    of different types of activities. From things
    that are illegal to things that are very legal,
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    things that are very like non-violent to sometimes
    things that could potentially be violent.
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    Constructive, destructive, that sort of thing.
    I think, part of what makes anarchism unique
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    is there's no assumption that legality equals
    morality.
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    Any party based organization
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    from the most left-leaning
    to the furthest right-wing
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    utilizes a hierarchical structure
    in its form of organizing.
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    They also form part of
    the political circus,
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    the spectacle.
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    There's just a lot of people that are fed
    up with politics as usual. They're fed up
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    with the economic system that really just
    is ringing them out to dry. They're fed up
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    with elections.
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    In the face of capitalist catastrophe,
    in the face of the capitalist devastation,
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    it is necessary to have this energy.
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    There are those of us who can't
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    - there are many people who can't
    stay calm and continue life
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    in this "normality"
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    when it is evident that
    they are exterminating our future.
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    In popular discourse, the word anarchy is
    commonly used to describe the absence of organization.
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    It’s the spectre of chaos that fills the
    vacuum formed by a sudden breakdown of order.
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    A violent free-for-all, where the strong take
    advantage of the absence of rules to prey
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    upon the weak. This vision of anarchy has
    long been a useful projection for the ruling
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    classes, and every paranoid authoritarian
    unwilling to distinguish between order and
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    submission. But it’s a far cry from what
    anarchists actually believe in, and the world
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    that we’re fighting for.
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    The reality is that anarchists take many different
    approaches and hold a multiplicity of views
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    when it comes to the role of organization
    and its relationship to struggle. This lack
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    of orthodoxy has historically set anarchism
    apart from other revolutionary traditions,
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    such as Marxist-Leninism, whose multiple competing
    schools of thought generally agree on the
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    need for a centrally-organized party... just
    disagree about who should lead it.
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    For more than 150 years, anarchists have experimented
    with a wide range of different organizational
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    forms – from syndicalist trade unions with
    over a million dues-paying members, to informal
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    networks of small affinity groups; from federations,
    committees and assemblies, to tightly knit
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    cells and loosely-structured associations
    of autonomous individuals. This process of
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    experimentation continues to this day.
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    One of the beautiful things about Anarchism
    is that there's not one set blueprint. It's
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    a tension and it's striving towards freedom.
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    Anarchists hold a lot of different views on
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    organization and the role that organizations
    play in struggle. I think this relates to
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    different positions people hold and things
    around thinking things happen more spontaneously
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    to folks who want a higher level of coordination.
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    The main split within anarchism over this
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    question is between individualist anarchists
    or egoists and collectivists. Individualist
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    anarchists oppose most forms of organization,
    their focus is on building up the autonomy
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    of the individual. and they basically see
    organizations as a hinderance on individual
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    autonomy. And then collectivists basically
    believe in organizing collectively and organizations
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    are often a big component of that.
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    This also goes hand in hand with different
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    opinions on the basis of how people are organizing
    and interacting with each other with some
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    anarchists being in favor of more formal organizing
    and organizations that sort of have a clear
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    and defined membership usually specific sort
    of bylaws or different things that like govern
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    them. Other anarchists can be quite critical
    of organizations and prefer more informal
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    organizing methods sometimes this can entail
    still having organizations or groups but having
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    them form for only one specific purpose or
    one specific type of activity then having
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    them dissolve.
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    There are obviously pluses and minuses with
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    both formal, so for instance federations or
    labor unions and informal things like affinity
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    groups and cells and stuff like that. But
    I think that there are also really key questions
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    for anarchists in the 21st century, how we
    interact with the public and how people come
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    into anarchism beyond this supposed dynamic
    of formal vs informal.
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    There are different positions.
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    So from more anti-social tendencies,
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    more insurrectionary,
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    there isn't really much of
    a call or direct invitation
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    for people to join up or
    to start believing in anarchist ideas.
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    More than being convinced,
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    those groups have participants
    because of their own ideas and feelings.
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    But there are comrades
    whose political work is more social,
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    more based in people-power,
    who believe in organizing from below
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    and neighborhood organizing.
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    During the insurrectionary period in the United
    States from like 2008 and 2009 on, a lot of
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    us kind of glommed on to this idea that quality
    is better than quantity, which I would fundamentally
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    agree with, but at the same time, we need
    to find a way to actually meet people where
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    they're at, engage them and bring them into
    our projects and our movements so we actually
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    can grow. You know in the past couple decades,
    people were coming into anarchism through
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    things like punk rock or other subcultures
    or from different movements such as like animal
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    rights and things like that. And in the post
    anti-globalization era, anarchists have also
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    - at least in the United States, have really
    depended on kind of new cycles of struggle
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    to bring people in. So there's the anti-war
    movement, you get a new generation of anarchists,
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    there's "Occupy" there's the Ferguson rebellion,
    you get a new generation coming in. We can't
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    always depend on something popping off and
    then benefiting from that wave of new people.
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    I think here in Chile,
    we've had a chance to experience
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    a broad range of anarchist and
    anti-authoritarian practices and tactics.
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    Between territorial assemblies,
    between affinity groups,
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    between liberated spaces and squats,
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    between labor unions,
    between independant workers,
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    among professionals
    and among people who live on the streets.
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    Anarchism happens in subtle ways all the time.
    And we may not think of it that way because
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    like it's not the concept that we're used
    to thinking, but it's still anarchism. When
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    people think of anarchism they have this Eurocentric
    idea of what it is, the word itself, it hasn't
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    been around for that long but if you go by
    the textbook definition of what anarchism
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    is, indigenous people have been practicing
    anarchism and mutual aid for fuckin thousands
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    of years.
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    In these territories we are fortunate that
    many, many of us have Mapuche ancestry.
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    We also have that duality,
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    or that ability to position
    ourselves politically like this.
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    From the point of view of anarchists
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    - but at the same time not forgetting
    that we have our own history.
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    That we have our own individuality.
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    That we are from this territory.
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    That we come from a colonized territory.
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    That our history and our practices
    and our visions of anarchism
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    aren't going to be 100% the same
    as the anarchist comrades
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    from Palestine,
    Rojava, or Europe,
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    or from other parts of Latin America.
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    You know when people are faced with really
    horrible things in their everyday life, whether
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    it's eviction, watching people be deported,
    stuff that's happening on their job, a pipeline
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    going through their land... We really want
    to have people know that there's a community
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    of people in revolt that they can turn to,
    that they can then organize with to fight
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    back and to really hurt their enemies to the
    point at least where they're not able to do
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    what they're trying to do.
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    A good organizer has many tools in their toolbox.
    The trick is to know which tool to use when,
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    and to replace them when they stop working.
    This applies just as much to anarchists as
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    it does any other type of organizer. The main
    difference is what we’re trying to build.
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    Anarchism is based on the principle of self-organization.
    This is directly connected to the type of
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    world that anarchists seek to create. A world
    in which people can come
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    to collective decisions and take action autonomously,
    without waiting for orders or permission from above.
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    Anarchist organizing begins with the fostering
    of self-directed struggle. It involves agitating
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    and encouraging people to to take action directly
    to solve their problems. Without appealing to those
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    higher up the social ladder. From this starting
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    point, there are many different paths that
    you can take. Wherever you decide to go, the
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    most important step is your first.
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    Strategy and tactics are intimately connected,
    yet separate things.
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    You start off with a specific goal or a vision.
    Something that you want to accomplish, or
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    achieve, or want to challenge. And then your
    strategy is your plan of how you want to achieve
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    that goal. And then the tactics would be all
    the specific actions, activities and approaches
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    that would sort of come together to help you
    in meeting that goal.
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    The strategy that you choose will determine
    the type of activity that you engage in. When
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    your tactics are successful, or if they repeatedly
    fail, go back and make adjustments to your
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    strategy. Once you’ve made those adjustments
    to your strategy, you will then try to come
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    up with different tactics.
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    These things have to reinforce each other,
    and we have to also constantly be evaluating
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    back and forth.
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    You have to just do it. You gotta do it. You
    gotta kind of be there on the front lines,
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    putting in that work.
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    On the one hand, we visualize,
    theorize, develop our politics,
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    basically thinking on what it is we want
    - what we're seeking.
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    On the other hand,
    we start taking action
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    and we see how specifically
    we can make those ideas real.
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    We're all individuals.
    But everyone has their role.
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    In Chile we're lucky,
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    somewhat ironically,
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    that we have a history full of conflict.
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    A history of political persecution
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    and of riots.
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    So conflicts and objectives
    have always been present.
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    The strategies and tactics
    that have been used in general
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    have been pretty broad.
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    The tactics that are winning these days
    can be inspired by other struggles.
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    For example the tactics
    inspired by the conflict in Hong Kong.
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    The idea of using lasers
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    and of using water jugs
    to put out tear gas cannisters.
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    These are internationally used
    resistance and street fighting practices.
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    Then there's blocking the street.
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    There are barricades
    - different kinds too.
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    There's barricades of fire,
    or barricades of stones.
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    There are comrades who rescue
    and help those who are injured.
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    The world that we live in, how we engage with
    things, even how we come to think about things
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    is going to necessarily be influenced by the
    material conditions that we exist in.
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    The kind of classic Marxist quote: “People change
    history, but not in the conditions of their
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    own choosing.” That it is these conditions,
    these material realities, that impact not
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    only people’s lives, but also their consciousness.
    And that you can’t just think your way outside
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    of those things–or that there is no outside
    of it.
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    Capitalism is constantly changing the face
    of work, of social life, of the way people
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    are alienated from each other. So we need
    to be constantly kind of reevaluating, y’know...
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    ‘what is life like?’ And what are the
    possibilities for revolt against the kind
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    of lives that we’re forced to lead?
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    How can we really get to the nitty gritty
    of, like, alright... what’s going on here?
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    How are we gonna fix it?
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    People change the world around them through
    their actions. And so we can have an effect
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    on our material conditions, and we can change
    them—through struggle. The flip-side to
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    that is that the state can change conditions
    in order to remove the fuel for struggles.
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    I think it’s important to understand how
    power is organized, and the specifics of how
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    it operates.
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    The kind of world that we want doesn’t exist
    yet. It can only be built on the ashes of
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    this one. But at the same time, we’re trying
    to create new ways of relating to each other.
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    New ways of solving problems, new ways of
    engaging in action, new ways of carrying out
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    things like work that look towards the possibilities
    of new forms of life that don’t exist yet.
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    If you want a future society that is free
    form hierarchy and domination, if you want
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    a future society where people have autonomy
    and are treated equally, how you’re engaging
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    today has to reflect these values.
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    Sometimes we kinda have to take these chances
    and these risks, and try these alternative
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    ways of doing things.
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    Follow conflicts around the world
    that can also serve as inspiration.
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    So that we can have new experiences.
    New ways of attacking.
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    New forms of resistance
    within the territories in conflict.
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    To the extent possible, revolutionary movements
    should be creating a counter-society and removing
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    themselves from state and capitalist institutions
    as much as possible.
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    Basically what we can do is orient our efforts
    towards building competing centres of legitimacy
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    that are communal. That exist in opposition
    to the state, to the police and to capital.
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    We wanna prefigure the world that we wanna
    see and the relationships that we’re building.
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    Both in terms either of, y’know, building
    some sort of dual power or autonomous power
  • 23:48 - 23:52
    from the ground-up to meet our everyday needs,
    but also in terms of the struggles that we’re
  • 23:52 - 23:56
    engaging in. You know, those relationships
    should prefigure a different kind of mode
  • 23:56 - 24:01
    of life. And also, y’know, bring people
    into new ways of engaging with each other,
  • 24:01 - 24:07
    new ways of talking, new ways of solving problems.
    Insurrection and dual power of course need
  • 24:07 - 24:11
    each other. As the saying goes, ‘the force
    of insurrection is social, not military.’
  • 24:11 - 24:15
    And to create a social force requires, y’know,
    real infrastructure and space that we can
  • 24:15 - 24:19
    call our own. And the ability to use that
    space in order to fight back.
  • 24:28 - 24:34
    On December 1st, 2019, a 55 year old resident
    of Hubei province walked into a hospital in
  • 24:34 - 24:40
    Wuhan with an apparent case of pneumonia.
    This was the first documented instance of
  • 24:40 - 24:46
    COVID-19, a novel strain of Corona Virus that
    has since swept across the globe and turned
  • 24:46 - 24:49
    daily life upside-down for billions of people.
  • 24:51 - 24:53
    At the time these words are being written,
  • 24:53 - 24:58
    we appear to be at the precipice of a mass
    social and economic breakdown on a scale not
  • 24:58 - 25:05
    seen in the past century. If nothing else,
    this pandemic has exposed the myth of capitalism’s
  • 25:05 - 25:12
    infallibility and laid its weaknesses bare.
    It has also demonstrated the need to be able
  • 25:12 - 25:18
    to quickly adapt our strategies and tactics
    to confront rapidly changing realities. Slowly
  • 25:18 - 25:25
    at first, and then all of a sudden, our mobility
    and ability to associate have been curtailed,
  • 25:25 - 25:30
    and time-honoured tactics such as rallies,
    marches, door-knocking and even handing out
  • 25:30 - 25:32
    flyers have been taken away.
  • 25:34 - 25:39
    But as the saying goes, necessity is the mother
    of invention. In times of social and political
  • 25:39 - 25:45
    upheaval, hold fast to your principles. Rid
    yourself of dogmatism. Keep your eyes on the
  • 25:45 - 25:50
    prize. And brace yourself to meet whatever
    challenges come your way.
  • 25:54 - 25:59
    Anarchism is a beautiful, amazing thing and
    has done a lot of great things historically.
  • 25:59 - 26:07
    Also, it's often something that fails. And,
    I think failure is okay, and there is often
  • 26:07 - 26:11
    a lot of value in things that I’ve come
    to take away even in times there has been
  • 26:11 - 26:17
    big failures or struggles. Saying you’re
    anarchist, and you’re getting involved in
  • 26:17 - 26:22
    anarchist organizing and struggle, whatever
    that looks like, you are declaring yourself
  • 26:22 - 26:28
    to be very openly against many of the things
    that currently exist, like the state, the
  • 26:28 - 26:33
    police and capitalism. And, you should just
    realize from the beginning that that sometimes
  • 26:33 - 26:35
    has consequences.
  • 26:39 - 26:44
    Take yourself seriously. Once you declare
    yourself an enemy of the state, the state
  • 26:44 - 26:49
    will take that very seriously as a threat.
    Jail sucks and once you have a criminal record
  • 26:49 - 26:54
    it makes things more difficult for you in
    the future, so you should take adequate steps
  • 26:54 - 26:57
    to try to protect yourself and avoid unnecessary
    arrests.
  • 26:58 - 27:02
    What are the major things going around that
    you could actually impact with people that
  • 27:02 - 27:06
    you're close to, that you have a relationship
    with. And whether that’s at your workplace
  • 27:06 - 27:09
    or that’s at your school, whether that’s
    in the neighbourhood, you know something going
  • 27:09 - 27:13
    with the police, something going on with massive
    amounts of gentrification, whether there’s
  • 27:13 - 27:17
    a resource extraction project happening on
    the land base that you’re on. From that
  • 27:17 - 27:22
    understanding that analysis, then going about
    how would you begin to organize and bring
  • 27:22 - 27:27
    people together and begin to act and begin
    to engage in such a way that begins to push
  • 27:27 - 27:32
    back that, you know, puts your own interest
    forward and starts to attack those of the
  • 27:32 - 27:34
    dominant class.
  • 27:36 - 27:39
    The Police
  • 27:39 - 27:43
    The Judges
  • 27:43 - 27:46
    The State
  • 27:46 - 27:50
    The President
  • 27:50 - 27:58
    The oppressive state is the rapist
  • 27:58 - 28:01
    The rapist is you
  • 28:05 - 28:11
    Certain groups want to assert their power
    and ownership over you, and over your body,
  • 28:11 - 28:18
    what you have to say. This is not about ownership,
    this is not about who owns the revolution,
  • 28:18 - 28:22
    or who owns the struggle, like were all in
    this shit together. And if somebody is not
  • 28:22 - 28:25
    willing to struggle it out, like let’s say
    you’re calling them out on patriarchy or
  • 28:25 - 28:30
    whatever the fuck it is, if they’re not
    willing to struggle it out with you than that
  • 28:31 - 28:36
    shows that obviously that individual or that
    entity or whatever… like, they don’t give
  • 28:36 - 28:42
    a fuck. If people are truly invested in the
    struggle than when shit comes about you’re
  • 28:42 - 28:47
    going to be able to struggle it out. Even
    if it takes time, even if you have to stop
  • 28:48 - 28:51
    organizing for a bit until you work shit out.
  • 28:54 - 29:01
    I would invite fellow anarchist comrades
  • 29:01 - 29:04
    to realize that we have the potential
    to organize ourselves,
  • 29:04 - 29:09
    to hold positions and politics
    that are intersectional
  • 29:09 - 29:13
    with people who may not
    necessarily be anarchists.
  • 29:14 - 29:18
    To those who embrace
    anti-speciesist ideas.
  • 29:18 - 29:21
    To those who embrace
    anti-patriarchal ideas.
  • 29:21 - 29:23
    To those who embrace
    ideas and spirituality.
  • 29:23 - 29:29
    To those who rescue some of the ancestry
    lost to these centuries of colonization
  • 29:29 - 29:36
    that European, western, white
    hetero-patriarchy has imposed on us
  • 29:36 - 29:37
    - has snatched.
  • 29:38 - 29:41
    You’re saying you’re against all these
    things, and you’re going to be fighting
  • 29:41 - 29:46
    against all these things. Obviously, sometimes,
    there’s pushback, and there’s difficulties
  • 29:46 - 29:49
    and stuff in your life that you’re going
    to have to push through.
  • 29:49 - 29:53
    After you do an action, you know, take some
    time with your comrades and sit down and reflect
  • 29:53 - 29:57
    critically on what you did well, and what
    you could have done better. And then, try
  • 29:57 - 30:02
    to incorporate the lessons you’ve learned
    through your own experiences into your future
  • 30:02 - 30:03
    organizing.
  • 30:03 - 30:08
    And we really got to think about, like, “okay,
    when we do this, how do we actually win?
  • 30:12 - 30:16
    Like, we wanna actually be able to do damage against
    people that are hurting us, we wanna be able
  • 30:16 - 30:21
    hit back in such a way that expands our influence,
    our confidence, you know, the spaces that
  • 30:21 - 30:26
    we hold. We need to actually find ways of
    intersecting with people that are interested
  • 30:26 - 30:31
    and then bringing them on board, involve them
    in struggle, and have them be forced to pick
  • 30:31 - 30:36
    a side that literally supports illegal, anti-capitalist
    modes of action, and gets people thinking
  • 30:36 - 30:41
    about the possibilities of what they could
    do if there was a movement behind them to
  • 30:41 - 30:44
    better their own lives and conditions.
  • 30:54 - 31:00
    We live in a time when despair comes easily.
    A steady flow of bad news keeps us constantly
  • 31:00 - 31:06
    on edge. Massive fires ravage Australia for
    months on end. Police departments outfit their
  • 31:06 - 31:13
    body cameras with AI-driven facial recognition
    software. A family in Idlib freezes to death
  • 31:13 - 31:20
    after their makeshift refugee camp is bombed.
    Emergency ordinances outlaw all public gatherings
  • 31:20 - 31:26
    of three or more people. Confronted with all
    this, there’s no shortage of reasons why
  • 31:26 - 31:32
    any rational person might feel viscerally
    discouraged and utterly depressed. And that
  • 31:32 - 31:37
    is especially true for revolutionaries who
    consistently find our hopeful idealism swallowed
  • 31:37 - 31:41
    up by feelings of bitter resignation and defeat.
  • 31:41 - 31:46
    But when this despair comes, it is important
    to remember that we are not alone. That there
  • 31:46 - 31:51
    are many other people who share our sense
    of grief, anxiety... and most importantly,
  • 31:51 - 31:57
    outrage. That we are part of a long and proud
    lineage of struggle. And that victories are
  • 31:57 - 32:03
    still possible. Armed with this knowledge,
    and conscious of our own capabilities, opportunities
  • 32:03 - 32:09
    and limitations, we can turn our attention
    back to the task at hand, which is, as always,
  • 32:09 - 32:13
    to build our collective power, and increase
    our shared capacity to resist.
  • 32:13 - 32:17
    So at this point, we’d like to remind you
    that Trouble is intended to be to be used
  • 32:17 - 32:22
    as a resource to promote discussion and collective
    organizing. Are you interested in stepping
  • 32:22 - 32:27
    up your organizing game? Looking to launch
    a new initiative, but not quite sure where
  • 32:27 - 32:32
    to begin? Consider connecting with some comrades,
    organizing an online viewing party of this
  • 32:32 - 32:35
    film, and discussing where to get started.
  • 32:35 - 32:40
    Interested in running regular screenings of
    Trouble at your campus, infoshop, community
  • 32:40 - 32:45
    centre, or even just at home with friends?
    Well don’t! We appreciate the support, but
  • 32:45 - 32:50
    that’s probably not a great idea right now.
    Instead, why not set up a discussion group
  • 32:50 - 32:54
    with some friends, each watch the episode
    on your own screens at home, and then go through
  • 32:54 - 33:00
    the online screening kit on our website for
    links to additional resources, and some questions
  • 33:00 - 33:02
    to help frame your conversation.
  • 33:03 - 33:08
    Also just a reminder that here at subMedia,
    we depend entirely on donations from our viewers
  • 33:08 - 33:13
    to keep things going... so if you’re able
    to pitch in to help support us, please do
  • 33:13 - 33:19
    so at sub.media/donate. If you can’t afford
    to support us financially, no worries! You
  • 33:19 - 33:26
    can stream and/or download all our content
    for free off our website: sub.media/trouble.
  • 33:27 - 33:32
    This episode would not have been possible
    without the generous support of Josh, Murph,
  • 33:32 - 33:37
    Sam, Tal, La Conxa, and the good folks at
    IGD.
  • 33:37 - 33:41
    Lastly, we’re sad to announce that this
    will be the last episode of Trouble for the
  • 33:41 - 33:46
    foreseeable future. It’s been an awesome
    run, but the subMedia crew has decided that
  • 33:46 - 33:50
    it’s time to move onto new projects. And
    to make that possible, we’ve decided to
  • 33:50 - 33:56
    pull the plug on Trouble. Given that we can’t
    meet up in person for the foreseeable future,
  • 33:56 - 34:01
    it seems like the perfect time to make this
    change. We want to assure all you Troublemakers
  • 34:01 - 34:06
    out there that we have some exciting new plans
    in the works that we think you’re going
  • 34:06 - 34:11
    to love... so stay tuned! And to everyone
    who has organized screenings, sent us ideas
  • 34:11 - 34:16
    for show topics, constructive criticism or
    positive feedback about the show... thank
  • 34:16 - 34:21
    you from the bottom of our hearts! Your support
    has been truly humbling, and we hope that
  • 34:21 - 34:25
    the 24 episodes that we’ve cranked out will
    continue to serve as useful organizing tools
  • 34:25 - 34:26
    for years to come.
  • 34:26 - 34:29
    Now get out there…. and make some trouble!
Title:
Trouble #24 - Organize: For Autonomy & Mutual Aid
Description:

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Video Language:
English
Duration:
34:51

English subtitles

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