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    I'm Art Blaser in Orange, California
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    South of Los Angeles.
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    And the first question had to do with
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    my background and how I became aware
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    of the ADA, a disability association.
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    In my case,
    although I had some knowledge before,
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    not a lot less than most people,
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    til I became disabled,
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    which was in 1983,
    I had a brain stem stroke
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    and became disabled and a full time
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    wheelchair user today.
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    And I would say that
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    the issues of disability accommodations
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    I confronted.
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    A big one was access to my home
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    and a simple one was access to my job.
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    That although curb cuts were in theory
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    supposed to be in place
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    by 1995, in practice, they weren't.
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    They are today, which I think is
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    emblematic of the impact of the ADA.
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    As of now we've got things
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    to the time, but,
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    the spirit of the ADA
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    was the confrontation of
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    people being public about their needs.
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    And eventually, Orange, where I live,
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    had curb cuts at the corners, which meant
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    it was possible for me to live
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    about five blocks from campus.
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    I had improvements also and accommodations
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    which included a computerized voice
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    that makes it possible to teach.
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    The kinds of things that
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    wouldn't have existed decades ago.
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    Fortunately, in California as a professor,
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    I was able to take advantage of
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    good state laws.
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    But I think they're being forced by
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    the spirit of the ADA.
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    We see the ADA's effect for good
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    point of the spirit
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    and some things that don't work
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    just about every day that they
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    try to get access to different buildings.
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    And quite often, the experience
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    of other people say
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    this shouldn't be happening,
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    but in fact it is.
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    But the big difference is
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    is that were people motivated,
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    eventually things change and adapt.
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    I've noticed it most
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    in education
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    that I teach
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    at Chapman University, since 1981,
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    so before the ADA.
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    And, when I was not disabled,
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    I teach today
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    I noticed a lot of the effects through
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    teaching disabilities at least.
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    And, I've had students
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    who actually grew up knowing
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    that the ADA existed
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    and they're the so-called "ADA generation"
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    which makes a big difference.
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    People are claiming disability and trying
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    to make the world a better place.
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    And, in many cases, they're successful,
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    and in some cases, not.
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    But there are reasons for it
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    and I think there's a desire
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    to understand the reasons.
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    I think they want us to
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    prioritize and recognize separated people,
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    the association of where
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    and how people live,
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    and the contrast between nursing homes
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    and lacks of the community
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    or congregate settings.
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    And we're experiencing through COVID-19,
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    the current crisis,
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    a lot of death in nursing homes worldwide.
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    And, we also have the coordinance of the
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    Unites States fills decades, which Friday
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    the interpretations of it, but
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    it will threat of the right of people
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    to live in the community
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    guaranteed by the
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    Americans with Disabilities Act.
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    I think one of the
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    unfortunate things we are seeing
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    is the lack of forward movement
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    toward nursing home reforms
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    or eStatements.
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    We can't continue to live in congregate
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    settings and a number of people are
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    active big of what that thing is,
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    the independent living centers
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    and independent living movement,
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    some things that I feel privileged
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    in a lot of ways to be involved in
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    with a center for independent living
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    for Orange county and LA.
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    And a major issue has been
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    transitions from nursing homes.
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    And, that will continue to be a major
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    issue including interpretations of cores,
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    which I think is very important
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    not only in the United States,
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    but also elsewhere as well.
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    England has noticed roughly
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    the same thing happening
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    that about half of the deaths
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    are people in nursing homes.
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    They can tell that a bit of the issue
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    is that now we're seeing a lot
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    of people who've had COVID-19
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    tested positive and recovered,
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    but a lot of indications that they
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    haven't recovered perfectly.
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    That many of them like me have stroke,
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    some things that are similar to
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    multiple sclerosis,
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    and a lot of people haven't thought
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    of themselves as disabled, but in fact
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    have many of the conditions of disability.
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    And an important factor
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    in the coming years
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    I think will be that people
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    claim disability
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    and discover that it's actually a part
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    of the way a lot of us live.
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    And that's something that's
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    going to go away because
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    to people like me
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    is we can make the world a lot better
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    by acknowledging the rights
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    that should come along with disability.
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    The most important step that
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    we as community members can take
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    is education while they can see that
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    all of us are involved
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    in through their lifespan
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    because they can see inside there.
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    And considering people to both
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    dimensions of disability
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    some with pride and positive atitudes
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    towards human differences continue
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    through their lifespans and
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    know religious organizations
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    at first, might find it difficult to
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    deal with disabilities through politics
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    like the Americans with Disability Act
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    and Vocabularies Right,
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    but that's very necessary.
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    And at the colleges and universities
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    I know we have to graduate disabilities
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    to this program.
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    But as a community,
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    I think everything affects the media.
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    Sometimes we see things differently,
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    but an increase in disability
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    of disability is important.
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    Fortunately, we have projects like
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    the disability and visibility project,
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    a number of instances
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    of involvement of the media,
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    foundations like the Rotherham Foundation.
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    But a number of indications that
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    in the future disability will be something
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    that people are likely to talk about
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    and deal with in a positive way.
标题:
vimeo.com/.../436888534
Video Language:
English
Team:
ABILITY Magazine
Duration:
10:18

English subtitles

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