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Sarah Sze: Emotional Time | Art21 "Extended Play"

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    (tranquil music)
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    (traffic noises)
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    (gentle music)
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    - This is one of the most
    radical architectures built.
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    Over 70% of this building is a void.
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    It's the air, it's the
    light, it's the tilt.
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    It's all of these things
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    that really create an
    entirely new inner world
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    when you enter this museum.
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    You see how people behave differently.
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    They move differently.
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    Your whole sense of
    time and space changes.
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    How do you make a piece that
    helps me, helps the viewer,
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    helps the building understand itself anew?
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    (tranquil music)
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    (scratching sounds)
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    (lively music)
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    (lively music)
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    (lively music)
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    (lively music)
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    When you come up here,
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    you start to see this thing
    called the River of Images.
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    The River of Images
    goes around in one loop.
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    Moving images seem
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    like they're just bleeding
    into architecture.
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    The bay is this image maker.
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    It's making images through these shadows,
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    the shadows of the sculpture, my shadow,
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    and two images moving together.
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    So it's like a live film
    and this is total chance.
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    This will happen once every month.
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    The reels are in different
    speeds, so the moving images,
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    they collide at different times,
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    and then as you come around
    and you see this sculpture,
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    if you go to the top of the sculpture,
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    it really draws attention to
    this incredible oculus ceiling.
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    This is an important idea that
    people would go in the bay
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    and look out, 'cause you
    never stand where the art is.
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    You can imagine,
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    what's it like to be a
    painting hung in this space?
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    That's what you see.
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    (pensive music)
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    (voices murmuring)
    (beeping sounds)
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    (clock ticking)
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    I use very mundane
    materials to really push
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    at that question
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    of how you imbue value
    in inanimate objects.
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    (pensive music)
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    People are very careful around the work.
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    There's a sense that any
    wind could just topple it.
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    That's really the cusp that
    I'm interested in meeting
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    where things are right at
    the point of coming together
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    but really at this fragile point
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    where you could imagine them
    falling apart at any time.
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    (pensive music)
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    Looking at it, you can
    try and trace a history
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    of how it's made.
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    It's all there for you.
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    You can see the clamps,
    you can see the props.
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    (pensive music)
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    (rustling sounds)
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    (tearing sounds)
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    (rustling sounds)
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    (clanging sounds)
    (rustling sounds)
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    (tranquil music)
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    Every artwork is a timekeeper.
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    It's a time capsule of
    what it means to be alive.
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    To go see an ancient artwork
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    and realize this was
    touched by human beings,
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    this was seen by centuries of people,
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    and I am now having a conversation
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    with all of those human
    beings through an object.
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    (tranquil music)
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    Anything in this museum is here
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    because hundreds of people
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    have shepherded that work through.
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    The artist is just one piece of that.
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    I'm really grateful for
    the people I work with.
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    When I was young, I look
    at my painter friends
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    and I would say they
    spend the whole day alone.
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    (Sarah chuckling)
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    Now that I have children, and I teach,
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    and I have older parents,
    being alone in a room
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    with a painting is an incredible pleasure.
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    (pensive music)
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    (faint background noises)
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    (tranquil music)
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    For this show,
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    I wanted to only have paintings
    bigger than your body.
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    The paintings became portals
    to interior landscapes.
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    They tell us about how
    we see inside our heads,
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    how memories are collected,
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    how they're lost, how they're
    misinterpreted, reinterpreted.
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    There's a longing for interior images
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    because there's so many exterior images
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    that that balance has changed.
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    Like in my generation,
    if you asked me like,
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    what did you look like as a child?
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    There's like four pictures
    that my parents framed
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    and they put on the wall,
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    and that's what I think I looked like.
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    You know, with my children,
    there's, you know, a day,
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    there's 70 pictures.
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    We have a really different
    sense of the image.
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    (tranquil music)
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    During the pandemic, it was
    very hard to measure time.
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    For most of us, our
    serendipitous interaction
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    with people was cut down dramatically.
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    Those moments have emotional intensity.
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    What you were wearing,
    what it smelled like,
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    what it sounded like,
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    all of those things helped us mark time.
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    Art can show you how time
    is marked through emotion
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    like no other medium.
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    Because that's how we as
    human beings measure time.
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    I think when I'm on my deathbed,
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    I will think emotionally
    about the timeline of my life
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    and art is a thing that gives
    us this way of seeing that.
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    (tranquil music)
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    (tranquil music)
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    (tranquil music fading)
Title:
Sarah Sze: Emotional Time | Art21 "Extended Play"
Description:

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Video Language:
English
Team:
Art21
Project:
"Extended Play" series
Duration:
07:31

English subtitles

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