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COVID-19 vaccine: Side effects, distribution, and differences between coronavirus vaccines

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    [How will COVID-19 vaccines
    be prioritized?]
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    The people who are going to be
    prioritized to receive the vaccines
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    are healthcare workers
    who are on the front lines,
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    as well as anybody
    who works in a hospital,
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    and then those who live
    in skilled nursing facilities.
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    Skilled nursing facilities
    account for about 6% of the population,
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    but almost 40% of the deaths due to COVID.
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    So these are very high-risk individuals
    for bad outcomes from COVID.
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    [Are there side effects
    from a COVID-19 vaccine?]
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    It looks like it's the same
    kind of side effects
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    that you would get from influenza
    or a tetanus shot.
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    You get a sore arm for a day or two,
    maybe a headache or fatigue,
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    and then that goes away.
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    There's no way that you can get COVID
    from the coronavirus vaccine.
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    So there's absolutely no way.
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    It's just a small fragment of the RNA
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    that encodes for a small portion
    of the spike protein.
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    So it doesn't replicate,
    it can't replicate,
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    and it can't cause COVID.
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    [What does a vaccine mean
    for masking and social distancing?]
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    We're going to have to be masking
    and social distancing
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    for the foreseeable future.
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    When we'll be able to stop masking
    and social distancing
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    is when we achieve
    some level of herd immunity
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    within our communities.
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    That's going to take 60 to 70%
    of the population to be immune.
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    Right now, through infection,
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    if people are immune after infection,
    which we're still not sure,
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    there's been less than 10% of people
    in the US who have been infected.
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    And then when the vaccine comes out,
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    it's going to come out
    in limited quantities,
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    and so we're not going to be able
    to vaccinate everybody all at once.
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    So we anticipate that we will be able
    to achieve that 60 to 70% immunity
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    either through infection plus immunization
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    in maybe the middle of 2021,
    maybe the end of 2021.
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    We'll just have to see.
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    [How do COVID-19 vaccines work?]
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    So there are three main vaccines,
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    and two of them
    are messenger RNA vaccines,
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    mRNA,
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    and those are the ones produced
    by Pfizer as well as Moderna.
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    And so those vaccines, what they are,
    is a fragment of the messenger RNA
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    that encodes for a certain portion
    of the spike protein of the coronavirus.
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    That's the vaccine.
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    So when that is given to us,
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    then our own cells make that protein,
    just a fragment of that protein,
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    and then we have an immune
    response to that protein,
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    and that's how they work
    to develop immunity.
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    The other vaccine is similar,
    the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.
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    It's a nonreplicating adenovirus vector
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    that again has a fragment
    of the spike protein,
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    and so then we get
    an immune response to that.
Title:
COVID-19 vaccine: Side effects, distribution, and differences between coronavirus vaccines
Description:

As the U.S. awaits news of the COVID-19 vaccine, UC Davis Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases Dean Blumberg offers an update on the distribution, side effects, and differences between the vaccines by Pfizer, Moderna, and AstraZeneca.

For the latest information and resources on COVID-19, visit:
https://health.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/

See the latest news from UC Davis Health:
https://health.ucdavis.edu/newsroom

#vaccine #coronavirus #covid19

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Video Language:
English
Team:
Amplifying Voices of Change
Project:
COVID-19 Pandemic
Duration:
03:10

English subtitles

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