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vimeo.com/.../436582706

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    - [Interviewer] Now, do you see
    the record button in the corner?
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    Up in the corner it should say
    "Recording," and so-
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    - [Leroy] Yep.
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    - [Interviewer] Okay, cool.
    And then I'm gonna mute myself
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    while you introduce yourself.
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    You're going to tap on the table
    or make a noise before you start.
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    - [Leroy] Okay.
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    Hello, my name is
    Leroy Franklin Moore, Jr.
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    and I live in Berkeley, California.
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    I am an author, activist, founder
    of many organizations,
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    founder of Krip Hop Music with a K
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    to, back in the day,
    I had a nonprofit called
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    Disability Advocates
    of Minorities Organization,
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    and I also helped to start
    what's called Sins Invalid.
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    I'm a journalist with POOR Magazine,
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    and yeah, just an activist and a writer
    of many books.
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    The latest book is
    Black Disabled Ancestors.
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    And I'm also a lecturer
    on college campuses.
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    - [Interviewer] Great, Leroy, thank you.
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    Okay, so the first question is
    tell of your first memory realizing
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    that there were accessibility issues,
    discrimination, or lack of inclusion.
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    What is your personal story or connection
    to the Americans with Disabilities Act?
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    What do you remember about the day
    that it was signed, if applicable,
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    and what was the impact on you
    and on others?
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    - [Leroy] So the first example that
    I realized that there was discrimination
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    was back in the early '80s
    when me and two other Black disabled boys
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    decided to a letter campaign,
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    and this was before computers
    so we had to write.
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    So we did a letter campaign
    to a lot of Black organizations
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    and Black leaders at the time
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    asking why there was no
    Black disabled people on TV or anywhere.
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    So that was the first time
    that I, you know, put it on my shoulders
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    and challenged the system.
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    So the other time when I realized
    that there was a lack of accessibility
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    is when I was attending my father's
    activist meetings in the early '80s,
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    and they were talking
    about police brutality
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    and other stuff that happens
    to Black community.
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    And when I left that meeting,
    I was approached by a disabled group
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    that wanted me to join their group to
    talk about, to advocate about curb cuts.
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    And I asked them, "Well, you know,
    I just left a meeting with my father,
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    "and they were talking
    about police brutality,
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    "and a lot of Black disabled people
    can't enjoy the curb cuts.
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    "They can't go outside, because
    they're getting shot by the police."
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    And the group said,
    "Well, we can't deal with that.
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    "We're dealing with curb cuts."
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    So that's when I really found out, like,
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    wow, this is two different worlds
    and two different issues.
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    So that's the first time that I
    found out there's, you know, difference.
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    And with the ADA, you know,
    when the ADA was signed
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    and that picture was everywhere,
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    once again, I looked at the picture
    and I was like,
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    "Huh. Nobody looks like me."
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    And back in the late '90s,
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    I had an organization called Disability
    Advocates of Minorities Organization,
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    and we had tons of copies
    of the cover of the ADA,
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    and we put on the top of the ADA
    who is, what is missing from this picture.
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    And, of course, we all knew the answer
    is people of color,
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    so, you know, that was the first statement
    that I made about the ADA.
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    You know, it was like where is
    people of color in the picture of the ADA?
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    - [Interviewer] Yay!
    Beautiful, thank you.
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    - [Leroy] Yeah.
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    - [Interviewer] The present.
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    Has the ADA made a difference?
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    Tell us about your a-ha moment
    that told you that the ADA
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    is or is not making a difference.
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    And to what extent, based on your passions
    and areas of expertise, where do you see
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    or not see the impact of the ADA?
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    - [Leroy] So, yeah, of course the ADA
    has made a difference in society,
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    in, you know, the global society.
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    You know, you can see it with
    accessibility in public places.
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    You can see it in communication, you know,
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    especially during these social network
    life that we're living in
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    with Google and Twitter, you know,
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    all of them are making their products
    more accessible, so that's good.
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    You know, we see a little-
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    We're in the airlines a lot,
    but, you know, yes, we see it.
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    And the place that it needs more growth
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    is, of course, people of color, you know,
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    people that are poor,
    people that are "immigrants."
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    And they still, the ADA do not reach them,
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    and that's why my organization
    in the '90s and early 2000s
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    had the Other Side Rally.
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    It was the other side of the ADA,
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    to give the voices of communities
    that hadn't felt the good of the ADA.
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    So yeah, it needs a lot of work,
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    especially when it comes to our cities,
    our inner cities.
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    You know, I live in Berkeley.
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    Berkeley's like a utopia place
    for people with disabilities.
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    You know, you see curb cuts,
    we've got the Ed Roberts building.
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    But if you go to East Oakland, you know,
    there's only a handful of curb cuts.
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    The roads are still bumpy;
    stores are still small.
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    So you can see the difference
    between communities.
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    And so that needs to change.
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    Of course, the high unemployment rate
    of people with disabilities
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    hasn't changed since the '80s.
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    Talking about Black
    and brown disabled people,
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    it's still a high 90% unemployment rate.
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    So that still hasn't changed.
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    And I can go on and on, but yeah.
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    There needs to be more push of the ADA
    in certain communities.
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    And also I think our leadership
    more actually needs to change.
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    Not only the president, but our
    disabled lobbyists needs to change.
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    We need more young people
    with disabilities
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    taking over the leadership
    who won't compromise,
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    because I think that's one
    of the biggest things that we lose
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    is that, when we compromise,
    we look back and it's like,
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    "Oh my God, we didn't get nothing
    for that compromise."
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    So I think we need more leaders
    that don't compromise.
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    - [Interviewer] Well said, Leroy.
    You're doing great, thank you.
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    For the future, and you may have already
    covered what you want of this,
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    but you can just listen,
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    and if there's more you want to say,
    then go for it.
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    With the work you've been doing,
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    you've seen a lot
    in terms of progress and barriers.
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    If you could pick one thing to change
    or that needs to occur
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    to have access and equality present
    in the lives of people with disabilities,
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    what would that be?
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    - [Leroy] I think people with disabilities
    in key roles.
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    I think we need a disabled president.
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    You know, in key roles,
    we need disabled people in the media.
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    We need disabled people in the DOJ,
    the Department of Justice.
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    The DOJ enforces the law,
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    so we need strong people
    that will enforce the laws.
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    We need more disabled people
    in all kinds of areas.
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    Education, mental health, legislators,
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    people that are passing budgets, you know.
    Yeah.
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    - [Interviewer] Thank you, Leroy.
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    And for the call to action,
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    what steps can we
    as community members take right now?
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    - [Leroy] Well, right now it's hard,
    because of this COVID-19.
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    Right now, people need to be safe,
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    you know, that's basically, from COVID-19.
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    Really think of what they're doing,
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    really think, you know,
    if it's necessary to go outside,
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    if it's necessary to protest.
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    Yeah, we definitely need to think
    what's really necessary
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    and what's not necessary.
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    So I think, at this time,
    we can't think of anything else,
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    because it's life or death, you know?
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    The media is talking about the elections,
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    talking about other things,
    but, if we don't live,
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    then we can't enjoy
    anything on this Earth.
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    So I think people really
    to take serious on this COVID.
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    Because t's not over,
    and that includes about all the services
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    and the laws and the lifestyles
    of people with disabilities.
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    So, yeah, that's on my plate.
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    The only thing that's
    on my plate right now.
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    It's, you know, trying to stay safe
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    and trying to stay in contact
    with people with disabilities.
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    - [Interviewer] Very nice, Leroy.
    Very nice.
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    Is there anything else that you want
    to say that you didn't say?
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    - [Leroy] I think also there needs to be
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    more mentorship
    for young disabled people coming up.
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    And mentorship in the public domain,
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    not only in the disability community,
    but in the community wide open
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    so people know about about it
    in other communities.
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    That and I also think that, going back
    to Black and brown disabled communities,
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    there needs to be a national campaign,
    national awareness campaign,
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    for the Black and brown community
    around disability,
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    because we do not get it through the ADA.
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    We do not get it through 504.
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    And, because of that, our communities
    are slowly becoming not important
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    for Black and brown disabled people.
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    We have to leave our communities
    to get services.
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    We have to leave our communities
    just to be recognized as disabled people.
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    So I think there needs to be
    a national campaign
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    in the Black and brown communities
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    so disabled people can return home
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    and really educate our
    Black and brown communities.
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    And what I call "Black ableism"
    is one thing that is a roadblock
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    for a lot of Black and brown disabled
    activists that want to come back home
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    and work in our communities.
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    So we need a national campaign
    so we can get rid of the Black ableism.
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    - [Interviewer] Awesome, Leroy.
    Awesome.
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    I appreciate you taking your time out
    to just share your thoughts,
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    and I think this is gonna be eye-opening
    for a lot of people.
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    I love it, thank you.
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    - [Leroy] Yeah!
    So when is this gonna go up?
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    - [Interviewer] So let me-
标题:
vimeo.com/.../436582706
Video Language:
English
Team:
ABILITY Magazine
Duration:
16:40

English subtitles

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