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Octotales: MailChimp

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    (footsteps)
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    (entry device) Access granted
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    Hi Freddie!
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    MailChimp is awesome and special,
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    because it's a group of creative misfits
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    who are also really smart.
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    I have learned an immense amount
    of information from all my coworkers
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    and it's great to be able
    to learn something new every single day
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    from somebody
    I wouldn't expect to learn from.
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    Thank you.
    Welcome to MailChimp!
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    ♪ (soul music) ♪
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    MailChimp is email marketing software
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    that lets you design and build
    and send email campaigns
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    and also manage
    your lists of email subscribers
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    and do really amazing things
    like email automation and analytics.
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    ♪ (upbeat music) ♪
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    We're an interesting company now.
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    We really praise creativity,
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    even down to the operations team.
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    We're encouraged
    to be creative in our solutions.
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    We let anybody make a change to our code,
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    and once it's been peer reviewed,
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    it gets deployed
    to production automatically.
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    We can throw an idea out there,
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    people can iterate over it.
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    You can collaborate together
    even if you're not in the same room.
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    We're big on Infrastructure as Code here
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    and so, we can collaborate with our code
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    and for an infrastructure guy,
    code is essentially our poetry.
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    So that's how we get to be
    creative in our roles.
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    I think everyone is encouraged
    to be creative in their work
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    and everyone can be
    creative in their work.
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    It's not just for designers
    or marketing people to be creative.
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    And that's kind of
    what she's asking, right?
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    New engineers who come work here
    could have all kinds of background,
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    specifically, in our job listing
    we say that we don't care
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    what stocks you've worked in
    and what pedigrees you have.
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    We're just looking for great engineers.
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    For the longest time, we actually had
    a three month ramp-up for developers
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    because we had to teach them
    our internal system,
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    whereas now, we've narrowed that down
    to a few days, and in fact,
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    some people come in on day one
    and they're contributing code,
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    and can just hit the ground running.
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    It's not necessarily something
    that you have to teach people
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    how to use Git or how to use GitHub
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    or how to do a pull request.
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    They generally know how to do that,
    which makes my job easier!
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    When we created our GitHub environment
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    we gave everyone
    in our product team access to it
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    so a tester can click
    the link to the pull request
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    and read, and see the diffs,
    and read all the changes
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    and it's really helpful
    for understanding the scope of features
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    because sometimes an engineer
    will describe something
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    and it sounds really simple,
    and then you pull open the code
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    and you realize that one tiny change
    touches 20 pages, and for testers,
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    that's really useful information to have.
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    We are legitimately better at our jobs
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    because we can see what's going on.
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    ♪ (happy music) ♪
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    We don't really have silos.
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    We are encouraged
    to work cross-departmentally
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    and in fact, we actually have
    a class we call "MailChimp University."
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    The classes we offer
    at MailChimp University
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    are all focused on interpersonal skills
    and leadership skills.
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    We realized that growth is happening
    whether we want it to or not
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    and that was going to have
    an impact on our culture.
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    We decided we needed to find
    kind of a robust, consistent way
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    to engage our staff
    and to give them tools
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    that made them able
    to grow well at every level.
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    I think those are substitutions.
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    One of the things I really like
    about MailChimp University
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    is it's helping us keep our culture
    as we grow the team.
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    All the classes are very tailored
    towards the MailChimp culture.
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    The other thing I really like about it
    is it's for everyone.
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    Individual contributors
    and managers will learn
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    key communications skills,
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    from how to listen well
    and how to listen deliberately,
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    to how do you give feedback effectively
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    focusing on information
    and keeping emotion out of it.
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    That's kind of the core
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    MailChimp University
    curriculum for all staff.
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    It's really nice to have a company
    that tries to break down
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    the silos between organizations
    that normally wouldn't talk to each other,
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    and also, a company that's encouraging
    growth in its employees.
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    I feel like we've done a pretty good job
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    trying to listen to what people
    need in the moment
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    and then evolve as those needs change.
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    Every decision that you make
    kind of has a ripple effect.
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    I don't think we're unique in that sense.
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    I think that the way that we're trying
    to solve those problems
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    is very specific to maintaining
    MailChimp's culture.
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    People decided to work here for a reason
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    and we want to make sure
    that we keep those reasons alive.
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    What really attracted me to MailChimp
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    was really my desire to be
    on a team of creative people
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    where I could learn from them,
    we could collaborate together,
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    and also further my craft as a developer.
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    To be a part of a team that really
    saw that as a value to the product.
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    (stomping, clapping, laughing)
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    ♪ (music ends) ♪
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    ♪ (music) ♪
Title:
Octotales: MailChimp
Description:

more » « less
Video Language:
English
Team:
GitHub
Project:
OctoTales
Duration:
05:31
Karine Gantin edited English subtitles for Octotales: MailChimp
rdgalang edited English subtitles for Octotales: MailChimp
Denise RQ edited English subtitles for Octotales: MailChimp
hiro_ria commented on English subtitles for Octotales: MailChimp
Melanie Ty approved English subtitles for Octotales: MailChimp
Melanie Ty edited English subtitles for Octotales: MailChimp
Melanie Ty edited English subtitles for Octotales: MailChimp
Melanie Ty edited English subtitles for Octotales: MailChimp
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  • I’ve found a typo in the English transcript at 3:18:

    Current:
    We realize that growth is happening
    whether we want it to or not

    Suggestion:
    We realized that growth is happening
    whether we want it to or not

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