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#Revolution

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    #Revolution
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    Arab Spring, Domino Effect, Twitter Revolution: That's how we see it...
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    by Davide Galati and Antonella Sinopoli
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    Freedom is extremely important for human beings.
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    The real revolution, I think, took place in Tunisia.
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    I admired the courage of these guys,
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    and I respect them a lot for what they did.
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    In a very undemocratic country such as this
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    Is difficult to find the strength to march and protest.
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    In Tunisia getting rid of Ben Ali was almost impossible.
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    It wasn't easy because everything had to change.
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    Before, Ben Ali was untouchable.
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    People were tired of a fake democracy.
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    Revolution really changed everything.
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    In other countries, I think, Europe pushed for changes
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    because of economic interest, for instance in Libya.
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    Everybody knows that oil caused the war, even if no one says it.
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    Why the war? Libya was a nice place to live in.
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    Not many Libyans live abroad, because Libya is nice country.
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    Instead, in countries like Somalia
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    people suffer hunger and poverty; there people live miserably.
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    But nobody moves a finger.
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    Our revolution spread in the whole Middle East,
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    first in Egypt, then in Libya, a radical change took place.
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    To a certain extent, the Tunisian revolution helped other countries to understand
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    that protesting and marching on the streets is important.
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    These revolts can help other countries,
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    they can be seen as a model to imitate.
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    Now, in Senegal, here and there something takes place, not a revolution,
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    but still, we are fighting against changes in our constitutional law.
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    Constitution cannot be changed simply with a referendum.
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    It's not possible because, as I said before, our culture is different.
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    Yes, we have different cultures, we don' t have the same kind of courage.
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    We are not inspired like them.
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    We prefer peace and quiet. We want to be left alone.
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    We see what happened in Congo,
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    and in other countries near Cameroon.
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    And we don't want to end up like them.
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    So, we prefer the status quo: it's easier.
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    We survive and we get food on our tables.
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    Future is hard to predict, really hard...
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    ...but we can accept that.
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    In Morocco there is no revolution. There was some protest, some loose movement.
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    But there is no revolution because people lives comfortably.
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    They feel that changes are happening all around,
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    and for this reason they don't want the revolution there,
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    although they ask for some constitutional changes,
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    which recently have been approved by the King.
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    I believe 98% of the people voted Yes.
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    Whoever you meet these days, in Italy or in Morocco,
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    will say for sure that in Morocco life is very good,
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    that the King is astonishing, first-class,
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    that the economy is improving, everything is terrific.
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    So there is no need for a revolution.
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    Unfortunately, it's not true. If in Morocco everything can be bought and everything can be sold as well.
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    So there is no need for a Constitution, no need for women's rights
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    since parents, sons, husband can buy all women's rights.
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    They can buy them with their own money.
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    It seems that 70% of the population voted and 99% chose Yes.
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    99% is always a magic number in Arab countries.
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    A search for "Movement 20 February" on YouTube, every Sunday,
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    because still now, people take it to the streets on Sundays.
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    The number of people protesting is incredible.
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    So, you have to ask yourself about that 99%? Did it fall from the sky?
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    In Morocco, the national TV ignores any protest, any hardship.
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    Not even Al Jazeera mentions them. Al Jazeera is not doing a good job there.
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    I think that Morocco... has been the most clever country so far.
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    Elections and Constitutional changes promoted by the King,
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    In fact, no substantial change took place.
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    It's a joke. I am from Morocco, and I think it's a mockery.
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    Morocco is not yet ready, it needs to grow to become aware of the situation.
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    There is a movement that is doing something,
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    but is not enough.
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    Sadly, Moroccan politicians are too sharp, too clever.
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    They are able to exploit tools and media (like TV)
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    to convince the public opinion to support their regime.
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    Also, for the older generation is almost impossible
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    to imagine a Morocco without a King.
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    I think that more than 50% of Tunisian revolution is due to the Internet.
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    Internet was paramount as a communication tool,
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    to ensure the success of this revolution.
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    And this time social networks played a crucial role
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    also because these revolts were promoted mostly by young people.
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    I followed the events on the Net, calling my family, on Facebook...
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    ... then on newspapers and Al Jazeera.
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    There is a feeling that they are speaking the truth, and indeed people trust Al Jazeera.
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    TV in general is manipulated, being owned by private groups,
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    that have profit in mind and inform only about what they like.
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    As for National TV, as we know, the government has its own agenda
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    regarding its own internal and foreign policy,
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    so State media are affected by this approach.
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    Instead, on the Net news sources are diversified.
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    For instance, on social networks young people in particular,
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    but also the general public, can share first-hand information.
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    Internet now is a communication medium
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    ...that can immediately reach millions of people.
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    It can be a useful means, but we cannot give up the streets,
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    because the streets are the real thing,
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    where all the events organized online will eventually take place.
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    Today we interact mainly online.
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    It's inevitable, then, that if a revolution had to take place
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    that was the way to conjure up people, especially youngsters.
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    Because this movement included not only Tunisia or Egypt
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    but the whole Mediterranean and the Middle East are bound together.
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    We speak the same language, so we are all connected.
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    Facebook, Twitter, are the fastest and better way to exchange information.
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    The social unrest was shared, so the media had to be shared as well.
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    But I don't think that Facebook itself widened the revolt.
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    People must have been extremely distressed for something like this to happen.
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    The spark that ignited everything was the situation in Tunisia.
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    No one, nobody could have imagined what actually happened.
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    Everyone has the right to internet access,
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    and governments needs to understand this.
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    I went and I said that I would not be returned,
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    and wrote on all walls, that I would not be returned.
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    All barriers have collapsed,
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    our dreams were our weapons,
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    our future is clear, we waited a long time.
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    We are still looking for our place
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    We continue to look for the site to which we belong,
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    in every corner, in every country.
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    The call of freedom there is calling
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    from every street corner of our country
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    the call of freedom there is calling
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    Rewrite history
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    If you're one of us, join us
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    and does not prevent us from achieving our dreams.
Title:
#Revolution
Description:

Primavera Araba, Effetto Domino, Twitter Revolution. Loro la pensano così...

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Video Language:
Italian
Duration:
11:51
antonellasinopoli edited English subtitles for #Revolution
bernardo parrella edited English subtitles for #Revolution
bernardo parrella edited English subtitles for #Revolution
giorgio.guzzetta edited English subtitles for #Revolution
giorgio.guzzetta added a translation

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