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Block Everything!

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    This episode of It's the End of the World
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    As We Know it and I feel Fine
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    was made possible by contributions
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    from slaves like you.
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    Spank you very much!
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    This amateur footage
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    captured the violence of an attack
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    on two police officers on Wednesday.
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    After kicking in the police car's windows,
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    a protestor threw an explosive
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    into the vehicle...
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    setting it alight.
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    The attack occurred while a protest
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    was being held BY the police
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    not far away at Paris'
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    Place de la Republique.
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    This spring over 350 of them
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    have been injured by protestors
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    during the Up All Night movement
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    and anti-Labour Law rallies.
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    A few hundred people
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    defied a state order
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    and gathered at the same time
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    to march against police brutality,
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    chanting Everyone Hates the Police!
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    Goooooooooood morning slaves
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    and welcome to another sedition of
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    It's the End of the World as we Know it
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    and I Feel Fine...
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    the show where pigs
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    get reality checks cashed…
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    free of charge.
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    It really poses the question -
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    what do you want to do?
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    Do you want to take a chance
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    and risk getting KNOCKED OUT?
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    Oh my god!
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    Oh......wow!
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    What an idiot!
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    What a loser!
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    Good!
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    I am your host the Stimulator
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    and though you wouldn't know it from
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    watching the corporate fucking media...
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    The candidates took to Twitter!
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    My word!
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    Indeed there was a lot to discuss.
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    for months now, peeps in France
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    have been teaching the world
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    a valuable lesson on how to wage
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    a popular mothafuckin insurrection.
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    While a fair amount of attention
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    has been devoted to Nuit Debout
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    - the vibrant movement
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    of participatory democracy
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    whose participants continue to hold
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    nightly assemblies in cities
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    across the country,
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    outside of these occupations,
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    a broader decentralized movement
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    has been steadily expanding
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    in a nationwide showcase
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    of tactical innovation
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    and militant fucking resistance.
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    In just one example,
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    on mothafuckin May Day
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    militants in the northern city of Rennes
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    stormed and occupied La Maison du Peuple
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    - or House of the People - transforming it
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    into a public gathering space
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    and logistical hub complete with
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    its very own guerrilla radio station.
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    These badass squatters held down
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    the occupation for nearly two weeks,
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    before a heavily militarized
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    tactical squad managed to take back
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    the building on May 13th.
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    Buuuuuuuuut rather than accepting defeat,
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    peeps just said fuck it!
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    And went ahead and re-occupied
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    the building on May 27th,
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    forcing the cops to come back
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    and clear it out again two days later.
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    Yup… France has become
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    a veritable mosaic of revolt,
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    a tapestry of combative street demos,
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    occupations, direct actions,
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    and nationwide one-day general strikes.
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    The latest of these was on May 26th, when
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    over 150,000 people took to the streets
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    in cities across the country,
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    with riots and clashes with police
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    breaking out in Toulouse, Nantes,
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    Lyon, and Bordeaux.
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    In Paris over 20,000 peeps
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    took to the streets for a
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    particularly rowdy demo.
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    During the fracas
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    a 28 year old photographer, Romain D,
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    was critically injured
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    by a police flashbang grenade
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    and ended up spending
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    eight days in a coma.
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    On June 4th a large contingent of antifa
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    hit the streets of Paris
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    to commemorate the third anniversary
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    of the murder of 18 year old anti-fascist
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    Clément Méric,
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    who was killed by neo-nazi shitbuckets
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    back in 2013.
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    After a few luxury shops
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    and a real estate agency
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    were smashed the fuck up,
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    the march quickly descended into
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    a pitched street battle,
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    with the pigs attacking the demo
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    with tear gas, flashbang grenades
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    and rubber bullets
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    - and militants responding in turn, with
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    bottles, bricks and other projectiles
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    French workers have also thrown down
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    in a serious fucking way,
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    paralyzing the country with
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    a series of coordinated strikes
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    and blockades aimed at
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    forcing the government to back down
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    on its package of proposed labour reforms
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    - the so-called Loi de Travail.
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    Given French workers' proud history
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    of militant wildcat actions,
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    bossnappings
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    and industrial fucking sabotage,
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    the country's tepid union leadership
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    has been forced to go along
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    with these strikes,
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    in a desperate effort to maintain
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    their position as
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    the legitimate negotiating partners
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    of the French State.
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    This wave of labour unrest
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    has hit the energy and
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    transportation sectors particularly hard,
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    with workers blockading oil refineries
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    and fuel depots,
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    and shutting down nuclear power stations
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    causing long line-ups at gas stations
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    and forcing the government to dip into
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    its strategic fuel reserves.
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    These workers have been joined by
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    striking train operators,
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    dock workers, truck drivers,
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    air traffic controllers,
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    and thousands of striking students.
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    Pilots with the national airline,
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    Air France, have also joined the fray,
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    announcing plans for a three-day strike.
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    This ongoing unrest
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    comes at a particularly bad time for
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    France’s shit-sipping socialist president,
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    Francois Hollande.
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    At the time of writing, the country
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    is bracing itself to play host
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    to Euro 2016
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    - a month-long football extravaganza
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    that will inundate the country
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    with tourists,
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    and put it firmly under
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    the international spotlight.
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    With the ruling Parti Socialiste
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    stubbornly refusing to back down,
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    the national trade unions calling for
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    another general strike on June 14th,
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    and intransigent French youth
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    giving no sign that they're gonna stop
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    lobbing rocks and bottles at pigs,
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    and setting shit on fire anytime soon,
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    the coming days and weeks should make
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    for quite the fucking show.
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    In my last sedition,
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    me and my subMedia slaves
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    took a fond look back at
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    the mothafuckin Oaxaca Commune,
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    an epic six-month long uprising
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    that turns ten years old on June 14th.
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    In my report, I pointed out that
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    the teachers of Section 22
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    of the Coordinadora Nacional
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    de Trabajadores de la Educación,
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    or CNTE,
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    who kicked things off back in '06,
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    are still holding shit down to this day.
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    For three years now,
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    they've spearheaded resistance to
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    neoliberal education reforms that
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    Mexico's taco-smuggling president,
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    Enrique Peña Nieto, has been trying to
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    impose on the whole fucking country.
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    Well... this work paid off.
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    And on May 15th - or Mexico’s
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    national day of the teacher,
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    members of the CNTE launched
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    an indefinite mothafuckin strike,
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    and peeps around the country took part
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    in a day of action that saw marches,
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    rallies and plaza occupations,
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    or plantóns,
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    break out in 23 of Mexico’s 31 states.
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    Since then, this strike has
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    totally fucking paralyzed Mexico's
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    education system,
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    with thousands of schools shut down
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    in the southern states of Oaxaca,
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    Chiapas, Guerrero, Veracruz and Michoacan
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    and support going strong in Mexico's
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    Federal District - where one in five
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    Mexicans live.
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    In Chiapas on May 27th,
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    thousands of teachers temporarily
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    took over a number of private radio
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    and television stations
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    to call bullshit on the corporate media’s
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    framing of the strike,
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    and to get their own message out.
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    That same day, teachers in Oaxaca,
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    in a truly impressive tactical manuever,
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    managed to surround a contingent
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    of hundreds of federal police,
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    forcing the pigs into
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    the awkward situation of having to
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    negotiate their own withdrawal.
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    In the areas most heavily impacted
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    by the strikes,
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    the teachers enjoy widespread
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    public support.
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    Not only are they demanding that
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    the government scrap their proposed
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    education reforms, but they're
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    also calling for increased funding
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    for education more generally,
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    freedom for all political prisoners
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    and prisoners of conscience,
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    and justice for the 43 missing
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    Normalista students from Ayotzinapa.
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    And that's why we're marching together...
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    for our teachers... for our children...
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    and for the generations still to come.
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    And a bit further south,
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    Colombia has also been
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    brought to a standstill,
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    in this case by a Paro Nacional,
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    or national strike,
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    initiated on May 30th by a broad-based
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    coalition of Indigenous groups,
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    Afro-Colombians, farmers, truck drivers,
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    teachers, students and precarious workers.
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    As part of the Paro,
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    an estimated 100,000 people
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    have taken part
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    in over 100 blockades, occupations
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    and so-called points of concentration
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    across the country.
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    This is the third Paro this year,
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    and each time they've gotten
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    more fucking intense.
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    A defining tactical feature
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    of these strikes has been
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    the coordination of mass highway blockades
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    by rural peasants, aimed at paralyzing
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    the national transportation networks
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    in order to force government concessions.
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    During the current Paro, participants
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    have raised a number of demands,
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    many of which focus on the ongoing
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    privatization of state assets
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    and national resources,
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    the failure of Colombia’s
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    lizard-faced fuck of a president,
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    Juan Manuel Santos,
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    to live up to previous agreements
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    with social movements,
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    and the horrific fucking state
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    of human rights in the country
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    – where disappearances and assassinations
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    of organizers and land defenders
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    are still common practice.
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    So.... to learn more about just
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    what the fuck's going down in Colombia,
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    I recently caught up with Marcela
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    of las Organizaciones Sociales de Arauca
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    - or the Social Organizations of Arauca.
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    Hey Marcela... how the fuck are you?
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    There is a lot of violence
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    against the people.
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    So, we are not doing well.
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    On May 30th, peeps in Colombia
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    staged a Paro National,
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    or a nationwide blockage,
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    somewhat akin to a general strike.
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    What led people to take this action?
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    Well, principally it's the economic model.
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    The people are tired of the same
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    economic policies that the government
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    has been implementing for decades.
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    These are the same policies that generated
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    the armed conflict in the country,
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    but they have also has generated
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    social issues that the people can
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    no longer continue to tolerate.
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    So this is what has provoked this
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    national agrarian, peasant, ethnic
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    and popular strike.
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    How was this Paro organized?
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    And what has the state's response been?
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    Well, the social movements are
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    connected to a platform called
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    the Agrarian Summit,
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    which includes participation from
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    peasant, indigenous and afro-descendent
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    organizations.
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    And there has also been dialogue with
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    other members of social sectors,
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    such as the truck drivers,
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    transporters, labor unions,
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    and other trade unions.
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    The people have been protesting for
  • 11:21 - 11:23
    a few years now and the government has
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    made promises that it has not fulfilled.
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    This new strike is demanding
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    the fulfilment of these prior agreements.
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    And the response from the government is
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    on one hand, to try and draw out
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    this dialogue, prolong these negotiations,
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    and on the other to repress.
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    To repress the people who are
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    mobilizing on the highways
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    and in the lands of Colombia.
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    One of the issues that organizers
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    of the Paro Nacional have raised
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    is the National Development Plan
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    being proposed by Colombia's president
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    Juan Manuel Santos.
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    What does this plan entail?
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    And why are people so opposed to it?
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    The National Development Plan is
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    a deepening of the economic policies
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    of the government.
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    Among other things, it allows
  • 12:03 - 12:04
    the land to be concentrated,
  • 12:04 - 12:06
    more than it already is,
  • 12:06 - 12:08
    into the property of businessmen,
  • 12:08 - 12:09
    cattle breeders,
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    and owners of agro-business.
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    It privileges mining, mineral extraction
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    and hydro-carbon extraction
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    above protecting the environment...
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    above maintaining
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    environmental equilibrium.
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    So basically it prioritizes extraction
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    at the cost of the resources and wealth
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    that the Colombian people produce,
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    and which exist in Colombian territory.
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    And this obviously negatively affects
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    the quality of life of the population.
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    So this is why the people are against
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    the National Development Plan.
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    Back in 1998, Billy Clint launched
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    Plan Colombia -a bilateral agreement
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    framed as an effort to help Colombia
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    fight a so-called War on Drugs.
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    This arrangement has continued under
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    both the Bush and Obama administrations
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    and has since served as a model
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    for the current war on drugs in Mexico.
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    What material effects has Plan Colombia
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    had on social movements in your country?
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    The consequences have been more poverty
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    and more militarization.
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    Really, drugs were just an excuse,
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    because here the drug problem
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    has not been resolved.
  • 13:06 - 13:08
    What was gained through Plan Colombia
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    was a massive increase to the budget
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    and resources required to finance the war,
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    to finance the state security forces,
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    to militarize the territories, the cities,
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    the countryside...
  • 13:19 - 13:21
    and so a consequence is that today
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    peoples lives are more heavily controlled.
  • 13:23 - 13:25
    Now the private sphere
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    has been militarized,
  • 13:26 - 13:28
    the schools have been militarized,
  • 13:28 - 13:29
    civil life in general
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    has been militarized.
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    That is the consequence of Plan Colombia.
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    And the phenomenon of narco trafficking
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    and the production of crops
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    with illegal uses,
  • 13:37 - 13:39
    continues basically the same.
  • 13:39 - 13:40
    How have the recent peace negotiations
  • 13:40 - 13:42
    between the government
  • 13:42 - 13:43
    and guerrilla groups like the FARC
  • 13:43 - 13:46
    and ELN affected the overall
  • 13:46 - 13:47
    political atmosphere in Colombia?
  • 13:47 - 13:49
    Well, the impact has been pretty negative
  • 13:49 - 13:51
    because on one hand,
  • 13:51 - 13:53
    the talks are not focused on resolving
  • 13:53 - 13:54
    the grave social issues that exist
  • 13:54 - 13:55
    here in Colombia.
  • 13:55 - 13:57
    What it has generated, on the other hand,
  • 13:57 - 13:59
    is polarization between
  • 13:59 - 14:01
    different sectors of the right-wing.
  • 14:01 - 14:02
    The neoliberal right-wing
  • 14:02 - 14:04
    of the industrial bourgeoisie, which is
  • 14:04 - 14:07
    connected to transnational corporations
  • 14:07 - 14:09
    has been supporting the peace process,
  • 14:09 - 14:11
    because it's a convenient solution
  • 14:11 - 14:13
    for them to pacify the territories,
  • 14:13 - 14:14
    in order to guarantee
  • 14:14 - 14:17
    the extraction of natural resources.
  • 14:17 - 14:18
    And the ultra right-wing, that is
  • 14:18 - 14:21
    closer to the cattle-breeding sector,
  • 14:21 - 14:23
    the oligarchy that is more closely aligned
  • 14:23 - 14:25
    with the land and landowners...
  • 14:25 - 14:27
    has not supported this process,
  • 14:27 - 14:29
    because they still believe that the state
  • 14:29 - 14:32
    has the military and economic capacity
  • 14:32 - 14:34
    to terminate and eliminate the guerrillas.
  • 14:34 - 14:36
    So this has been a small difference
  • 14:36 - 14:38
    in terms of the specific methods that
  • 14:38 - 14:41
    the right-wing and the oligarchy advocate
  • 14:41 - 14:43
    for ending the country's insurgency.
  • 14:43 - 14:45
    And so what the peace talks have done
  • 14:45 - 14:47
    is to polarize public opinion
  • 14:47 - 14:50
    between the two right-wing positions.
  • 14:50 - 14:52
    And as for the position of resolving,
  • 14:52 - 14:53
    in a structural way,
  • 14:53 - 14:55
    the problems facing the people
  • 14:55 - 14:56
    living in bad conditions...
  • 14:56 - 14:59
    this position is isolated,
  • 14:59 - 15:01
    neutralized and invisibilized.
  • 15:01 - 15:02
    As a precursor to
  • 15:02 - 15:04
    the current peace process,
  • 15:04 - 15:07
    in 2003 the government of Álvaro Uribe
  • 15:07 - 15:09
    began negotiations aimed at
  • 15:09 - 15:11
    demobilizing right-wing paramilitary
  • 15:11 - 15:12
    death squads, such as
  • 15:12 - 15:14
    the Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia,
  • 15:14 - 15:15
    or AUC.
  • 15:15 - 15:17
    This process was supposed to have
  • 15:17 - 15:18
    finished in 2006.
  • 15:18 - 15:21
    Did these groups actually demobilize?
  • 15:21 - 15:22
    And what happened to
  • 15:22 - 15:23
    the members of these groups?
  • 15:25 - 15:27
    Well, really it is not them...
  • 15:27 - 15:30
    paramilitarism is not a group of people.
  • 15:30 - 15:32
    Paramilitarism is a strategy,
  • 15:32 - 15:35
    or mechanism of extrajudicial violence.
  • 15:35 - 15:37
    Of dirty war.
  • 15:37 - 15:39
    Paramilitarism was implemented
  • 15:39 - 15:40
    by the Colombian government,
  • 15:40 - 15:42
    by private armed groups,
  • 15:42 - 15:43
    but also by members of
  • 15:43 - 15:45
    the state security forces - the police,
  • 15:45 - 15:48
    army, security organisms, DAS -
  • 15:48 - 15:50
    to be able to carry out
  • 15:50 - 15:51
    undercover operations.
  • 15:51 - 15:54
    That is what paramilitarism is...
  • 15:54 - 15:56
    it's a mechanism that claims to be
  • 15:56 - 15:58
    a third actor, external to the government,
  • 15:58 - 16:00
    that carries out grave crimes
  • 16:00 - 16:01
    such as tortures,
  • 16:01 - 16:04
    disappearances, massacres etc.
  • 16:04 - 16:05
    It is logical that if there are
  • 16:05 - 16:07
    private individuals who participated
  • 16:07 - 16:09
    in these structures, they could have
  • 16:09 - 16:11
    been demobilized in a dialogue
  • 16:11 - 16:12
    with President Uribe.
  • 16:12 - 16:14
    Some of these people were.
  • 16:14 - 16:16
    But others continue carrying out this role
  • 16:16 - 16:18
    - so knowing that, what had to be
  • 16:18 - 16:20
    eliminated was not
  • 16:20 - 16:22
    the individuals involved, but precisely
  • 16:22 - 16:24
    the mechanism of illegal violence
  • 16:24 - 16:25
    that has been implemented by
  • 16:25 - 16:27
    the Colombian state since the 70s,
  • 16:27 - 16:30
    when paramilitarism began.
  • 16:30 - 16:31
    And this has not been resolved.
  • 16:31 - 16:33
    Paramilitarism continues to exist
  • 16:33 - 16:36
    and those in power continue to use it.
  • 16:36 - 16:37
    There is the clear case of the
  • 16:37 - 16:40
    disappearances of activists demanding
  • 16:40 - 16:43
    Land Restitution for displaced people.
  • 16:43 - 16:44
    Despite the fact that
  • 16:44 - 16:46
    these paramilitary groups no longer
  • 16:46 - 16:48
    officially exist, these people
  • 16:48 - 16:50
    continue to be assassinated.
  • 16:50 - 16:51
    And they continue to be assassinated
  • 16:51 - 16:52
    for the same reasons.
  • 16:52 - 16:54
    For decades Colombia has been known
  • 16:54 - 16:56
    as one of the most dangerous countries
  • 16:56 - 16:58
    in the world for trade unionists.
  • 16:58 - 17:00
    What is the current situation
  • 17:00 - 17:02
    facing workers in Colombia?
  • 17:03 - 17:04
    The situation is grave.
  • 17:04 - 17:06
    You no longer hear statistics
  • 17:06 - 17:08
    of hundreds of dead labour unionists...
  • 17:08 - 17:11
    because they have already been killed.
  • 17:11 - 17:12
    So... with this violent aggression
  • 17:12 - 17:14
    against the labour union sector,
  • 17:14 - 17:16
    the unions have become divided
  • 17:16 - 17:17
    and the people have been dissuaded
  • 17:17 - 17:19
    from joining these labour unions.
  • 17:19 - 17:21
    And the few that still exist
  • 17:21 - 17:22
    are always threatened.
  • 17:22 - 17:24
    They live controlled by the state,
  • 17:24 - 17:26
    and repressed by their bosses
  • 17:26 - 17:28
    - like the cases of Coca Cola, Nestle,
  • 17:28 - 17:30
    and Drummond - where it was proved
  • 17:30 - 17:31
    that these companies used
  • 17:31 - 17:33
    paramilitarism to control and eliminate
  • 17:33 - 17:35
    labour leaders.
  • 17:35 - 17:37
    The result is that we don't even have
  • 17:37 - 17:39
    10% of the unionized workers
  • 17:39 - 17:40
    that we had 20 years ago.
  • 17:40 - 17:42
    Anything else you wanna add?
  • 17:43 - 17:45
    Well, what the peasants are demanding
  • 17:45 - 17:47
    - the peasants, indigenous people,
  • 17:47 - 17:49
    afro-descendant people, and the other
  • 17:49 - 17:51
    sectors that have joined this strike -
  • 17:51 - 17:53
    is the minimum that any inhabitant
  • 17:53 - 17:55
    of this country could demand...
  • 17:55 - 17:57
    to live in dignified conditions.
  • 17:57 - 17:58
    They are not asking for the government
  • 17:58 - 18:00
    to fulfil the impossible.
  • 18:00 - 18:02
    But the economic sectors that obviously
  • 18:02 - 18:04
    hold the political power in Colombia
  • 18:04 - 18:07
    do not want to cede absolutely anything.
  • 18:07 - 18:09
    They want to continue accumulating all of
  • 18:09 - 18:11
    the wealth that the country produces.
  • 18:11 - 18:14
    The wealth of the natural resources,
  • 18:14 - 18:16
    but also the wealth that is produced
  • 18:16 - 18:17
    by the workers.
  • 18:17 - 18:19
    And because of this, they won't even
  • 18:19 - 18:21
    allow for a decrease in the price of fuel,
  • 18:21 - 18:23
    or a lowering in the price of
  • 18:23 - 18:25
    agricultural supplies.
  • 18:25 - 18:26
    They won't even invest
  • 18:26 - 18:28
    a couple million pesos to fix the roads,
  • 18:28 - 18:30
    the ones used by the peasants to bring
  • 18:30 - 18:33
    their products to the principle cities.
  • 18:33 - 18:35
    They won't do it and we don't know
  • 18:35 - 18:37
    how long the people will have to protest
  • 18:37 - 18:38
    to force the government
  • 18:38 - 18:40
    to come to the table.
  • 18:40 - 18:41
    Thanks Marcela.
  • 18:41 - 18:43
    And that about does it for this sedition
  • 18:43 - 18:44
    of it’s the end of the world
  • 18:44 - 18:46
    as we know it and I feel fine.
  • 18:46 - 18:48
    We’d like to give a huge mothafuckin
  • 18:48 - 18:50
    welcome to the newest member of
  • 18:50 - 18:52
    the subMedia.tv family.
  • 18:52 - 18:54
    Weighing a whooping 10 pounds,
  • 18:54 - 18:56
    the person known as Agent Charlie
  • 18:56 - 18:58
    will be producing a mustard-like
  • 18:58 - 19:00
    substance, and keep us awake at night
  • 19:00 - 19:02
    for the next few months.
  • 19:02 - 19:04
    To the elites of the world,
  • 19:04 - 19:06
    we’d like to say - watch the fuck out!
  • 19:06 - 19:08
    Because Agent Charlie is already training
  • 19:08 - 19:11
    to be a lean mean fascist-killing machine.
  • 19:11 - 19:13
    Bienvenido al mundo mi hijo!
  • 19:13 - 19:14
    Don’t forget that if you would like
  • 19:14 - 19:16
    to know the names of the songs we played,
  • 19:16 - 19:18
    the samples we used,
  • 19:18 - 19:19
    to subscribe to our podcast,
  • 19:19 - 19:21
    sign up to our email list
  • 19:21 - 19:23
    or to send me diaper changing techniques
  • 19:23 - 19:25
    just visit my fuckin website:
  • 19:27 - 19:29
    that said, this recital of
  • 19:29 - 19:31
    reactionary rethoric is made possible
  • 19:31 - 19:32
    because slaves like you kick down
  • 19:32 - 19:34
    a few bucks to help us keep the lights on.
  • 19:34 - 19:37
    So many muthafuckin thanks to Mathew,
  • 19:37 - 19:39
    Jennifer, Banjamin, John, Francois,
  • 19:39 - 19:41
    Dylan, Kyle, Steven, Jonathan, Shannon,
  • 19:41 - 19:43
    Margaret, Derrick, Marten, Meghsha, Max,
  • 19:43 - 19:45
    Gregory, Breton, David, Maciej, Ricky,
  • 19:45 - 19:47
    Andrew, Alexanda, Roma, Sebastian, Yifan,
  • 19:47 - 19:50
    Mason, Christopher, Reto, Jeremy, Gavin,
  • 19:50 - 19:52
    Willie, Justyna, Kirk, Michael , Marisol,
  • 19:52 - 19:55
    Joseph, Sawyer, Raul, Sky, Andrew, Lauren,
  • 19:55 - 19:57
    Sebastien, Coby, Juliano, Stephen, Bruno,
  • 19:57 - 19:58
    Gabriel and William.
  • 19:59 - 20:00
    Tortas!
  • 20:00 - 20:01
    I also would like to welcome
  • 20:01 - 20:04
    the newest members of the taconspiracy:
  • 20:04 - 20:06
    Raul, Sawyer, Marten and Crystel.
  • 20:07 - 20:08
    Janitzio!
  • 20:08 - 20:09
    Finally I’d like to send a shout out
  • 20:09 - 20:12
    to Blandine and Milene for facilitating
  • 20:12 - 20:14
    our coverage in Mexico and Colombia,
  • 20:14 - 20:16
    and to our incredible translation team
  • 20:16 - 20:19
    for taking the time to interpret the word
  • 20:19 - 20:21
    fuck in many muthafuckin languages.
  • 20:21 - 20:22
    Domo Arigato!
  • 20:22 - 20:25
    Stay tuned next time for more news
  • 20:25 - 20:27
    from the global muthafuckin resistance.
  • 20:27 - 20:29
    Hasta la pasta compañeros!
Title:
Block Everything!
Description:

This week we catch up on the multi-layered insurrection taking place in France, where the state is struggling to get a handle on things, amidst regular protests, strikes, fuel shortages, and the general drunken chaos of soccer hooliganism.
Next up, check back in on the fearless militants of the CNTE, who have gone on strike in Mexico, and check out the Paro Nacional that has brought Colombia to a standstill. Finally we wrap things up with an interview with Marcela, of las Organizaciones Sociales de Arauca.

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Video Language:
English
Duration:
20:49

English subtitles

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