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www.youtube.com/.../watch?v=D2Zq3iZBLY0

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    Chromatic tunes, he can build,
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    FLÁVIO COHN
    GALLERY OWNER
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    as he said himself, that he seeks...
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    FABIO MAGALÃES
    TEACHER
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    This is common between
    the artist and his work...
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    MANFREDO SOUZANETTO
    ARTIST
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    It's actually the color that...
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    LUIS DOLINO
    ARTIST
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    Rodrigo once had the opportunity
    to tell me in a conversation...
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    (all talking at the same time)
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    CHROMATIC CHORDS
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    THE WORK OF RODRIGO DE CASTRO
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    I'll take the mask off a little bit,
    it's just us here.
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    I felt the call, the interest in art,
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    I felt when I was younger,
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    my father came home
    with gouache, brush, paper.
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    encouraged me and my sister
    to create something
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    spread it all over the living room floor.
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    What I liked to see was the mix
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    the basic thing,
    we mixed one color
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    with another and had another color.
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    And I took this interest for
    the colors until adolescence
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    RIO, 1960'S
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    What happened was like this,
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    my father got married
    and went to live in Rio de Janeiro,
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    and we lived there until I was
    fifteen years old, more or less,
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    when he won the Guggenheim award
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    and then we moved
    the whole family to New York
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    I had lived there for four years,
    I went to high school there,
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    And my father found out that
    I could go to the Vietnam War
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    and with this risk, my father said
    that I was going back to Brazil.
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    That's why I came back to Brazil,
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    I went to live in my grandfather's house,
    in Belo Horizonte.
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    But I asked for a transfer
    to a college in São Paulo,
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    and around here I stayed,
    I got married, I made my life here.
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    With daughters Marcela and Manuela.
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    With grandson Gael.
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    When I started to paint
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    I already started thinking
    about the colors
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    within a geometric structure.
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    I didn't start by painting a landscape
    or something like that,
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    I've already started
    the construction with color
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    Sometime back in the 80s,
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    I approached some artists in São Paulo,
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    and other friendships emerged
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    I got very close to Manfredo,
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    which ended up bringing me
    closer to Dolino.
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    Rodrigo de Castro is an artist
    who uses geometric language
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    therefore a cousin brother,
    we are in the same boat,
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    we enjoy the same language,
    the same creative purpose,
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    of the elements of
    a very simplified grammar.
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    to try to explain something
    with our artwork.
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    Rodrigo, in addition of being a master
    of the composition, the finishing,
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    of the finesse in the painting
    that he has been doing,
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    he is also a noteworthy colorist.
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    I believe that my work and Rodrigo's work.
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    we follow this trend that was triggered
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    by the teachings of Weizer and Guignard
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    and Tiberek at Escola Guignard
    in Belo Horizonte.
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    We may be the fourth generation
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    of a school that lasts,
    that influenced and that formed
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    the art in Minas Gerais.
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    When you make a first gesture
    on the canvas
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    the canvas reponds for you
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    this dialogue already begins
    to change its initial purpose,
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    because the creature already exists
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    so I would say it's a process,
    not a conversion.
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    then what is called regret, etc.
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    it's a very tense dialogue
    between the artist and his canvas.
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    He has a clarity, a synchrony,
    a very fine clarity.
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    and very defined of which is
    the universe he explores,
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    what are these colors,
    how he relates these colors.
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    how he matures these colors
    so that they become their own.
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    because the blue is a universal color
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    but what does that the blue he works
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    with the relation
    he establishes with the painting,
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    with the white, with the gray
    and the black.
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    What chromatic synchronies
    he can build, as he said,
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    that he looks for when he's painting,
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    as if it were a chromatic chord,
    as if he were playing the piano,
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    strumming the chords and
    suddenly he finds a harmony,
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    a chromatic harmony
    that has a sound, a vibration
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    that makes that he rectifies,
    make this composition,
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    and that people feel this harmony.
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    But this dialogue exists every day
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    until in the end
    we have a finished work
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    that it must vibrate a chord
    that I believe can
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    come out of the canvas into the world.
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    I go home at the end of the day,
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    the canvas sleeps, I sleep,
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    when we meet again,
    it has things to tell me
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    and I have things to observe
    and pay attention
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    if what i did the day before,
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    what the canvas is telling me
    is in accordance with what
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    I imagined would be
    the result of my work.
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    And what she tells me changes
    my original purpose
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    because I see that she was
    more right than I was before
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    it was better than I imagine.
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    I see the line as, it can
    split a space into parts,
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    but most of the time,
    when I think of the line,
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    it will not share a space,
    it will create new ones
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    and the creation of these spaces
    with the line happens with the color.
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    - It's that the line tensions the space,
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    apparently it was supposed
    to have a space break
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    but actually it's like being in a room,
    let's do a metaphor like this
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    and suddenly a light starts
    to illuminate this space
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    so, it enhances the space where it is.
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    For me, it's a very important
    element in your language.
Tytuł:
www.youtube.com/.../watch?v=D2Zq3iZBLY0
Video Language:
Portuguese, Brazilian
Duration:
14:47

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