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Creative Loading - HTML5 Game Development

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    So now that we have a working asset manager it's probably worth taking a step
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    back and talking about how good asset loading works in good games. See, proper
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    asset loading means you need to take into account how a user's going to
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    experience your game and benefit from that properly. So for instance, if you
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    were on a CDROM drive you have to know that it's going to take a certain amount
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    of time to actually stream data from the disc into memory. So, you have to
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    pretty much cover that by doing some 3 second animation or something else to
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    hide from the user, that's streaming overhead. Now, some very interesting
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    examples of this come to mind. The first is probably one of the more famous
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    ones, Devil May Cry, back on the original PlayStation 2. This game had a really
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    cool mode, that while the scene was actually loading, if you did your button
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    smashing, you'd actually do damage to the loading bar. I actually remember
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    sitting in my room watching my roommate kind of smash on this button controller
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    as mad as possible, because he was so angry that it was taking so long to load.
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    But by the time the level actually loaded, he was happy again and could go on
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    killing all sorts of demons. The second example that comes to mind is actually
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    Metroid Prime for the Game Cube. This was actually a simplistic tunnel shooter,
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    effectively you had segments of geometry that your player would move through
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    over time. They did something really cool, is that they only allowed one
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    section of tunnel in memory at a time. This meant that each tunnel could be
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    super high resolution graphics because there was nothing else competing for
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    space. As you moved towards the end of the tunnel, though, towards one of those
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    little doors you've got to shoot to open, it would start streaming in the next
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    level. The problem with this though was if you started running too fast, you
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    would get to the door before the streaming was done. You'd sit there shooting
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    the door and it wouldn't open yet because the next level hadn't loaded. My
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    personal favorite is actually Jak and Daxter. These guys had probably one of
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    the earliest streaming mechanisms that I ever found. And the coolest way to
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    hide it too. They had an infinite terrain. So you could run around and do all
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    sorts of stuff. But if you for some reason were able to move fast enough that
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    you were moving in an area that the terrain hadn't been streamed off a disk
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    yet, they'd trip your player. This is the only time in the entire game where
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    your player would actually fall down, and then play a 3 to 4 second get up
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    animation. Of course during that time they had plenty of extra space to spit up
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    the rest of the data from the disk. The point is this, most of game development
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    is smoke and mirrors, so take advantage of that to give your user a believable
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    experience.
Tytuł:
Creative Loading - HTML5 Game Development
Opis:

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Video Language:
English
Team:
Udacity
Projekt:
CS255 - HTML5 Game Development
Duration:
02:20

English subtitles

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