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Our Technology for Equal Access: Sensory Impairments

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    >> Eric: I’m Eric and I have a
    visual impairment called Stargardt’s
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    and it’s a macular degeneration
    which affects the center of my vision
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    so it makes it really hard to read,
    read fine print and see details
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    so I use the sides of my eyes
    to see more in the periphery.
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    >> Computer: Zoom Text enabled.
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    >> Eric: The main piece of
    assistive technology that I use
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    on the computer
    is ZoomText
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    which is a screen magnifier
    that allows me to make
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    everything on the computer screen
    as big or as small as I need it
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    depending upon what I’m reading.
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    There’s also a built-in
    screen reader on ZoomText
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    which I can also use
    to help read documents
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    because my eyes get
    tired really easily.
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    I use a TV monitor
    that I have on my desk
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    that allows me
    to see the board
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    and what is being projected
    on the board by the teacher.
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    >> Mike: Hi, I'm Mike.
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    My disability is
    that I am visually impaired.
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    I can see things up close but
    further away it gets blurry.
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    I use a whole bunch
    of different technologies
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    in my daily life.
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    My smartphone works brilliantly
    for what I need it to.
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    It has a whole bunch
    of different apps on it
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    that will help me
    in my day-to-day life.
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    I have Voice Dream Reader
    which is an input app
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    so you can switch over
    different types of media
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    and it will allow it
    to be read aloud to me.
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    >> iPad: Lyceum, Lyceum Tuesday
    July 19 2016, five-zero P-M.
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    >> Mike: And that's
    what the sign says.
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    Scanning is very important for
    somebody with a visual impairment
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    because there are a lot of printed
    materials in the world in general
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    that are very not
    visually impaired friendly,
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    not blind friendly.
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    >> Jessie: Hi.
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    My name is Jessie,
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    and I'm a fourth-year student
    at the University of Washington,
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    majoring in informatics
    with a minor in diversity.
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    And I identify myself as deaf.
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    So the assistive technology,
    I use a cochlear implant,
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    which is my own, personal device
    I need to hear.
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    I often use an FM system,
    which I give to my professor
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    so that I can hear the professor more
    directly through my cochlear implant.
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    It's like a microphone.
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    Another accommodation
    I use almost every day
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    is called CART, C-A-R-T,
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    which stands for
    Communication Access Realtime.
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    So what it is, is a captioning device
    that's real-time captioning,
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    that I can read the
    transcript on the screen
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    while the professor is
    talking in real-time.
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    >> Takashi: My name
    is Takashi
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    and I have a disease
    called retinoschisis
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    that affects my retinas.
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    Mostly I use my phone's camera
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    to take pictures of the whiteboard
    or homework or what not
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    and just blow it up
    as big as I can.
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    I use screen readers not so much
    but I do like them and
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    ZoomText on my laptop.
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    Smartphones are such
    an amazing tool.
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    I am oh so very glad that I was
    born in an era with smart phones
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    because I just can't
    imagine doing school
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    or living my life
    without a smartphone.
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    >> Grace: I'm profoundly deaf.
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    I grew up with two hearing aids
    and then last year when I was 17,
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    I got I got a cochlear implant
    on my right side
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    because I wasn't hearing anything
    through my right ear.
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    In school, in school I use an interpreter,
    a sign language interpreter
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    and also have a note taker
    for each of my classes
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    whenever I request one
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    and if the class has
    a video or movie showing
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    it usually has captions
    or if there's no captions,
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    my teacher will
    provide a transcript.
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    There's a lot of group projects
    in my engineering classes
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    and I just use an
    ASL interpreter pretty much.
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    And I talk to
    the other students
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    and make sure that they're
    aware that I'm deaf.
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    I just tell them
    to slow down a bit
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    or speak louder and they're usually
    very flexible with me.
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    >> Vincent: My name is Vincent
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    and I’m currently a
    PhD student at Georgia Tech
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    in human centered computing.
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    As it is with people with
    all types of disabilities,
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    people with the same disability
    also access information differently.
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    For example, I’m totally blind
    and I primarily utilize my computers–
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    and I say that because I have
    five or six different computers
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    with different operating systems–
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    and I utilize them
    different ways.
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    I access a lot using the variety
    of screen reading programs
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    with hardware and software
    -based synthesizers.
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    I am wearing something
    no one's even noticed yet.
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    I am wearing something that's
    off-the-shelf technology.
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    It used to be military and
    then it was extremely expensive.
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    This is a bone conduction headset
    designed for runners.
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    I wear one
    almost continuously.
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    This is off-the-shelf technology
    that anyone can use right now
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    and also my watch
    is connected to this
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    when things come through now
    I hear them in my head
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    even with people around
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    and I just hear the notification
    or whatever,
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    text messages,
    news updates.
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    And now I don't even have
    to go to my phone anymore.
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    >> Sheryl: My name is
    Sheryl Burgstahler
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    and I direct
    Accessible Technology Services
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    at the University of Washington
    in Seattle.
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    As you can see,
    it’s really important
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    that people with disabilities have access
    to the technology that they need
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    including assistive technology
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    so they can be successful
    in education, in careers,
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    and all the activities
    that they wish to pursue.
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    It’s also important
    that IT developers
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    including those that create websites,
    documents, software and other IT
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    make those products accessible to people
    who are using assistive technology
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    and to everyone else.
タイトル:
Our Technology for Equal Access: Sensory Impairments
概説:

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Video Language:
English
Team:
DO-IT
Duration:
07:44

English subtitles

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