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Teamwork: Making IT Accessible at the University of Washington and Statewide

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    >> Sheryl: My name
    is Sheryl Burgstahler
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    and I direct Accessible
    Technology Services
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    at the University of Washington.
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    And through our
    Access Technology Center
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    and other services,
    we’re making sure
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    that the IT
    that we develop,
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    procure, and use at the
    University of Washington
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    is accessible to all of our faculty,
    students, staff, and visitors.
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    >> Sheryl: In the state of Washington
    we now have a policy.
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    Policy 188 addresses
    accessible technology
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    and so it requires that our
    postsecondary institutions
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    in the state of Washington
    make their IT accessible to all
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    students, faculty, staff,
    and visitors with disabilities.
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    It requires that we be
    proactive in doing that
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    by auditing the
    software we have,
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    checking for accessibility, and making
    plans for making it more accessible
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    either ourselves for our websites or
    with vendors if it's a commercial product.
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    >> Patrick: My name is Patrick Pow.
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    I'm from University of Washington Tacoma.
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    My responsibility is technology.
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    I'm the vice chancellor
    for information technology.
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    When I look at Policy 188
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    I actually look at it
    as an opportunity
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    for us to enhance and do
    better on our campus.
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    >> Sheryl: As one of our efforts
    at the University of Washington
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    to ensure that all of the IT
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    that we procure, develop,
    and use on our campuses
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    is accessible to all of our
    faculty, students, and staff
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    who have disabilities,
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    we initiated a task force
    at the highest level.
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    And so we include people from HR,
    people from the disability services offices,
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    from our communications group,
    from our accessible IT group,
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    but many other units as well
    and we wrestle with how technology
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    can be made more accessible
    to people with disabilities.
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    And so some of the things
    that we do, for instance,
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    is have an inventory,
    particularly of the common
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    most widely used software, websites,
    and videos that we use on campus.
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    >> Dan: My name’s Dan.
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    The role that I’m playing
    in the Policy 188 effort
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    is to help assemble
    the inventory of IT on campus.
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    This is not a one person effort.
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    This is a multi-person effort.
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    >> Sheryl: We document what information
    we know about those products.
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    As time allows, we test those
    products for accessibility
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    and determine how we're going to
    make the products more accessible,
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    often working with the vendors.
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    >> Narrator: One of the
    task force’s priorities
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    has been to promote captioning
    of videos used on campus.
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    >> Sheryl: We have helped initiate
    a pilot actually where we
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    provide free captioning
    for videos on campus.
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    It's a limited amount of money
    so we’re not captioning all videos,
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    but we're captioning those
    that have a high impact.
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    >> Narrator: Now that pilot has
    turned into an ongoing service.
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    Some videos need both captions
    and audio description.
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    Audio description is
    additional narration
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    that describes the visuals
    on the screen
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    for those who cannot see them.
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    The "Best of UW 2016,"
    a year in review video,
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    used both captions
    and audio description.
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    >> Gina: I'm Gina Hills.
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    I'm the web communications director
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    for University Marketing
    and Communications.
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    This year's video was
    all visual, with music.
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    We did close caption the video.
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    The first stage was we put a little thing
    that said "music" on there.
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    >> Terrill: I'm Terrill Thompson.
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    I'm an IT accessibility specialist
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    at the University of Washington.
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    If you watch that video,
    the music contributes significantly
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    to the emotion that
    the video creates,
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    so it's featuring
    a lot of the really
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    wonderful things
    that have happened
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    at the university over
    the last year in 2016
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    and the music
    builds and swells
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    and just becomes much more
    dramatic as the piece grows.
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    And so they revised the captions
    to address that need
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    and really did an
    excellent job I think
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    of capturing exactly
    what the music is doing
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    throughout this piece
    as it grows and swells.
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    The other thing that's interesting
    about the Best of UW 2016
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    is that it was
    entirely music.
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    There’s no spoken audio.
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    Therefore somebody
    who can't see it
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    gets nothing out of it
    other than the music.
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    So they hear the music,
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    And, it's a wonderful piece,
    but to them it's just a music video.
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    They have no idea that
    all these wonderful things
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    happened at the University.
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    So all those details
    are missing for them
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    So that particularly is a video
    that requires audio description.
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    >> Audio description: Words appear,
    hash tag Best of UW 2016.
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    The Nobel Medal next to
    David J. Thouless,
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    2016 Nobel Prize in Physics.
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    With President Obama,
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    Mary-Claire King,
    National Medal of Science.
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    UW and Microsoft break record
    for DNA data storage.
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    A collage of photos,
    Inaugural Husky 100.
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    >> Gina: We covered
    all bases, all audiences,
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    and didn't leave
    anybody out
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    in terms of experiencing the
    previous year at the university.
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    I think that this
    is a good model
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    for what we can do
    and what we should do
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    and what we should aspire to.
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    >> Narrator: Another task force priority
    is helping faculty and staff
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    make PDFs and other
    documents accessible,
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    so that someone who is
    using a screen reader
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    can have the content
    read to them.
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    >> Sheryl: In our pilot
    on PDF accessibility
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    we're working with several
    large units on our campus
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    and we're contracting
    with some consultants
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    that will make
    PDFs accessible
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    so they'll remediate
    some of the PDFs
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    that have been developed
    in an inaccessible way.
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    >> Gaby: My name is Gaby de Jongh,
    and I’m an IT accessibility specialist
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    for Accessible Technology Services
    at the University of Washington.
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    At the University of Washington
    we have several hundred PDF documents
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    being uploaded to our websites,
    probably on a daily basis,
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    and many if not all
    of those PDF documents
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    are inaccessible to individuals
    who use text to speech assistive technology
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    in order to access
    those documents.
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    Accessible Technology Services has worked
    with UW Bothell and UW Tacoma
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    on a pilot project for addressing
    the large amount of PDF documents
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    that we have on
    the tri campuses.
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    The three campuses worked
    pretty closely together
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    using different tools to identify
    the number of documents that were on the website
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    and then coming up with a plan
    for going through those documents,
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    seeing if they actually really do need
    to be listed on the website
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    or if they need to be taken down
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    and if they do need to be
    listed on the website
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    what is the process,
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    what is the process that
    we're going to go through
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    in order to make sure
    that we’re going to
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    make all of those
    PDFs accessible.
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    >> Narrator: The task force
    helps develop and recruit
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    for capacity building institutes
    on accessible IT
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    for participants from
    units across campus.
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    >> Pete: My name is
    Pete Graff and I work for
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    the Office of the Chief
    Information Security Officer.
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    And a lot of the tools
    that we develop,
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    some of them are used
    on public facing websites
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    and we want to make sure that
    we're doing the best job that we can
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    to ensure that the tools that we provide
    are fully accessible.
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    >> Ana: My name is Ana Thompson.
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    I'm a learning technologist at
    University of Washington Bothell.
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    I enjoy tremendously attending the
    capacity building institutes
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    because it allows me to connect
    with other professional peers
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    who see the importance
    of universal design,
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    and also they help me learn.
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    They give me ideas on how we
    can do what I'm doing better.
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    >> Narrator: UW’s IT Accessibility Liaisons
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    are recruited From the UW
    capacity building institutes.
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    Liaisons engage online, participate in
    three training meetings each year,
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    and promote the accessibility of IT
    in their respective units.
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    >> Jodi: My name's Jodi
    and I work for UW-IT.
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    I'm heartened by the commitment
    that we have across campus
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    that we're not
    alone in this endeavor
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    and that we all want
    to do it together
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    and we have central resources
    to help us do that.
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    >> Narrator: Annual capacity building
    institutes on the UW campus
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    are also offered to representatives of
    postsecondary institutions state-wide.
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    Participants share promising practices
    for making IT more accessible.
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    >> Scott: Scott Towsley
    from Yakima Valley College.
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    I’m the IT director,
    director for e-learning,
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    and also the accessibility coordinator.
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    Actually coming to this training here
    is going to give us some best practices,
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    some contacts across the state.
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    Some of the things that
    we’re all looking at is
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    what software, common software
    can we all use?
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    What are some initiatives
    that everybody else is doing?
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    >> Carrie: My name is Carrie Powell
    and I work at Centralia College
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    and I am the Policy 188 coordinator
    at Centralia College.
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    It occurred to me that the
    reason we have so much good,
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    so many good things going on
    at our campus is that we,
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    my disability services director
    and I attended a
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    capacity building institute at the
    University of Washington three years ago
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    and it sparked an entire,
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    it led to a lot
    of amazing things.
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    But the first, the key thing was,
    we walked away knowing
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    that our task was to go
    back to our campus
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    and form a work group
    of interested stakeholders–
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    people from our IT department,
    e-learning, disability services,
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    from our college relations,
    from our legal services,
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    we just we got a
    group of people together
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    just based on asking
    and people said, "Sure,"
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    and so that was a key idea
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    that we took away from that
    first capacity building institute.
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    >> Bridget: My name
    is Bridget Irish
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    and I work at The
    Evergreen State College
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    located in Olympia, Washington.
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    My official position is as
    curricular technology support to faculty.
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    At The Evergreen State College,
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    some ways in which
    we try to make
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    our IT resources and
    tools more accessible
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    is one, by providing
    faculty with a template,
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    a template for use in Canvas
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    as well as a variety of templates
    available for use with WordPress.
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    >> Carly: I’m Carly Gerard.
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    I work at Western Washington University
    as a web accessibility developer.
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    One of our first starting points
    in making IT accessible is training.
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    Once we have people who
    understand where to begin,
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    what accessibility features
    to look for,
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    we can then help them,
    you know, manage their websites.
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    They can look for
    any accessibility issues.
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    We host training sessions
    both online and in person.
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    So our online training
    rolled out a few months ago
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    and we’ve had over
    200 people enrolled
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    before the end of the year
    who have now taken the training
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    and they can continue
    to edit their content
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    knowing these accessibility features.
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    We do also offer
    an in-person training
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    for those who may not be as
    comfortable with online learning.
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    >> Craig: My name is Craig Kerr.
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    I’m the director for services
    for students with disabilities
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    at Edmonds Community College.
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    Our professional
    development committee
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    what we’re going around
    to each division
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    to do trainings on how
    to make accessible documents.
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    Working with the professional
    development committee that’s based
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    of faculty
    sharing with faculty
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    the ways to make their
    documents accessible
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    is a key piece because
    you’re talking peer to peer.
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    >> Amy: Hi, my name
    is Amy Rovner
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    and I am an instructional designer
    and accessible IT coordinator
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    at Shoreline Community College.
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    We are also working on areas
    of captioning for our videos,
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    that’s a big thing to
    make sure everyone can
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    hear and absorb the
    content in the videos.
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    We've added Ally to
    our Canvas instance
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    so that students who
    may or may not have
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    an official accommodation
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    are able to access accessible
    versions of documents,
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    audible versions of documents,
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    even a braille, electronic
    braille version of documents
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    right away in real time.
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    >> Agnes: My name is Agnes Figueroa.
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    I work at Renton Technical College
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    and I’m currently the deputy CIO,
    chief information officer.
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    We started with convening
    an accessibility advisory committee.
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    In this group we try
    to gather together
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    people from various
    areas of campus
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    so we have representatives
    from human resources,
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    from the library,
    from e-learning ,
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    from IT,
    the disability office,
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    faculty members.
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    >> David: I’m David Engebretson Jr.
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    and I’m at Western
    Washington University
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    and I’m the digital technologies
    accessibility coordinator.
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    We’ve made some real efforts to
    create awareness about accessibility
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    and I think that’s kind of been
    the biggest change is that
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    our community is becoming
    aware of the need
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    for accessible and inclusive design.
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    As a blind person, I notice
    just little changes
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    making a big difference
    in the accessibility.
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    Headings on webpages and
    educational materials in general,
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    captions in videos,
    and
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    accessible graphics.
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    >> Jeremy: My name is Jeremy Seda
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    and I work for Big Bend Community College
    in Moses Lake
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    as the web and
    multimedia specialist.
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    It feels just so much
    more personal to meet
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    with other folks
    around this similar goal
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    and to really come together in a
    collaborative fashion to brainstorm
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    and to really work out the details
    of a problem that we're all facing.
  • 15:09 - 15:11
    >> Clay: My name is Clay Krauss.
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    I work for Tacoma Community College.
  • 15:13 - 15:18
    I'm the information technology
    director there on campus.
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    One of the most important things
    is bringing people together
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    and forming those networks,
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    the formal networks
    and the informal networks,
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    to dialogue and
    share ideas
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    regarding accessible
    information technology.
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    >> Zach: My name is Zach Lattin.
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    I'm an assistive technology and IT
    accessibility specialist at Clark College.
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    I have a really personal stake
    in this because I am,
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    have been blind since birth,
    so I use assistive technology myself.
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    We don't have to make
    this policy on our own.
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    We can work with people
    all over the place
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    and come up with the rising tide
    that lifts all boats, I think.
タイトル:
Teamwork: Making IT Accessible at the University of Washington and Statewide
概説:

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Video Language:
English
Team:
DO-IT
Duration:
16:37

English subtitles

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