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Immigrant and Refugee Mental Health

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    Hello, I'm Suzan Song,
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    Director of the Division of Child,
    Adolescent, and Family Psychiatry
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    of George Washington University,
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    and a Humanitarian Protecting Advisor
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    for survivors of forced displacement
    globally and domestically.
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    There has been an unprecedent surge
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    in the number
    of displaced people worldwide,
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    including refugees, asylum seekers,
    undocumented immigrants
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    and unaccompanied minors.
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    Around the world,
    more than 65 million people
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    are currently displaced
    by war, armed conflict or persecution.
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    As of early 2018,
    almost 31 million children worldwide
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    were displaced by violence and conflict.
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    If these current trends continue,
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    one in one hundred people
    will be a refugee in the near future.
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    Unfortunately, most refugees and
    survivors of force-displacement
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    will not receive
    needed mental health care.
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    due to discrecy of services,
    lack of access to qualified care,
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    and stigma against mental disorders.
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    Refugees are those who've fled
    their country of origin
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    due to well-founded fears of persecution
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    based on race, religion,
    nationality, political opinion
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    or membership
    in a particular social group.
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    Where as refugees request
    protection while overseas
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    and they're given
    permission to enter the US,
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    People seeking asylum also have
    a well-founded fear of persecution.
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    But they seek protection
    while inside the US.
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    Refugees and
    other conflict affected persons
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    are reported to have
    a 15 to 30 percent prevalence
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    of PTSD and depression,
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    compared to the 3.5% prevalence of PTSD
    among non-refugee populations.
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    The strongest predictors
    of poor mental health
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    are exposure to torture and
    a cumulative number of traumatic events.
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    But torture, separation from family,
    stressful asylum processes,
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    isolation and disadvantage
    in the host country
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    all worsen mental health.
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    The post-migration environment,
    mainly prolonged detention,
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    insecure immigration status,
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    poor access of services
    and limitations on work and education
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    can worsen mental health.
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    These do not provide the full scope of
    emotional issues
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    that many conflict defected person face
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    including complicated grief,
    complex trauma,
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    despair, isolation,
    anger and lack of trust.
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    Many people are experiencing
    normal responses
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    to very abnormal experiences.
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    Over time, most refugees
    show low or no symptoms.
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    A small number show
    a pattern of gradual recovery
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    and a small minority remain chronic.
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    So we need to evaluate the distinction
    between situational forms of distress
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    and a clear mental disorder for refugees.
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    We do this by focusing on a dynamic
    interplay of exposure
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    to past traumatic experiences,
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    ongoing daily stressors
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    and the core psycho social systems
    that one is embedded in.
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    Psychiatrists can help these populations
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    with culturally competent clinical work
    with refugees and asylum seekers.
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    At a policy level by conducting
    asylum evaluations
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    and at the advocacy level
    by promoting equity of access,
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    sustainability of services for refugees
    and forcibly displaces people,
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    and by partnering
    with inter-disciplinary community members
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    such as lawyers,
    educators and policy makers
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    to provide a safe system
    for which refugees
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    and survivors of forced displacement
    can rely on.
Titre:
Immigrant and Refugee Mental Health
Description:

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Langue de la vidéo:
English
Équipe:
Amplifying Voices
Projet :
Mental Health
Durée:
03:13

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