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Comment devient-on une bonne histoire ? | Nathalie Sejean | TEDxReims

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    Ten years ago, I quit my job as a bookseller
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    I packed my luggage
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    and I left Paris to live in Los Angeles.
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    I didn’t know anyone there
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    but I knew that I wanted
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    to make movies
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    so it made sense to go to Hollywood.
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    I came back to France
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    after a few years
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    and when people would ask me:
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    : “What do you do in life?”
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    I would reply:
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    : “I’m a filmmaker. I make movies.
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    Actually, I’m just back from a few years in Los Angeles.”
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    I would oftentimes see a little sparkle
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    in their eyes as they'd say:
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    “That’s amazing!
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    What type of films do you direct?
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    Can we see them at the movie theatre?
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    Have you worked with famous people?”
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    And I would reply:
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    : “I direct mostly fiction.
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    You can’t watch my films at the movie theatre
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    - not yet.
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    And no...no, I haven’t worked with anyone famous.”

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    At that moment
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    there would be a silence
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    long enough for their enthusiasm
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    to go down a few inches
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    And then,
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    we would keep on talking about Los Angeles.
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    Little by little,
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    tired of seeing people’s reaction
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    going from curious to disappointed
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    when they would realize
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    that I was a “wannabe”,
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    I started lying about what I was doing.
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    I stopped saying
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    “I’m a filmmaker”
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    to say “I work as a freelance.”
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    I stopped saying
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    to say “I make videos for clients.”
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    It sounded less dreamy
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    but it was useful and practical.
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    We would talk about how to find clients,
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    how to bill them, about gear.
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    And more importantly,
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    I stopped feeling like
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    like I had to apologize for my lack of success.
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    I began to feel a bit weird about it though
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    , so I asked myself
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    “Why do you lie about what you do?
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    And why do you feel
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    feel compelled to diminish people's expectations
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    so they won’t think you’ve failed?”
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    It’s at that point that I really started
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    to become interested
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    about the concept of “success”
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    and how it has evolved
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    in the last few years,
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    especially with the social medias’ arrival in our lives
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    that remind us daily
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    how we rank on the graph of success
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    compared to the other 8 billion.
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    This ranking on the “success graph”
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    explains why sometimes,
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    when we talk with people,
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    a contest starts
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    to find out who has the most impact.
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    It’s conveyed through innocent words:
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    “I know X person”
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    “X number of people follow me”
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    “I travelled through X number of countries”,
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    “I was a speaker at X event”.
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    Giving a TED Talk is great
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    to win an impact contest.
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    Thank you TED.
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    Power and Success have always existed.
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    And they’ve always been a fuel
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    for some people
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    and obstacles for others.
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    But in the last few years,
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    things have become so intense
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    that I’ve found myself listening to 24-year-olds
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    explaining that they had abandoned a dream
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    or an idea before they had even started.
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    And the reason why
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    they had given up before trying
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    is that they were paralysed by the success
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    of people younger than them
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    that they were witnessing daily on social media.
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    I’ve listened to 24-year-olds explaining
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    to me that if they really had something
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    to achieve on this planet
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    they should have had their breakthrough by now.
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    At 24 they didn’t feel old, they felt expired.
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    We have developed a surprising relationship
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    with what we could call our “expiration date”.
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    We used to have one expiration date:
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    : our death.
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    Today we have a second expiration date in our lives,
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    and it’s our social expiration date.
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    The idea that what we do must
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    be recognised and measurable to have value
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    And if we don’t receive immediately
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    a positive feedback about what we do,
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    or worse, if what we do is deemed useless,
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    ridicule, or a failure
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    , then we feel socially expired.
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    And that’s how some 24-year-olds
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    prefer to go sit on the bench
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    to watch History create itself without them
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    rather than risking to do something
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    and not receive immediately a positive feedback.
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    While I was looking into
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    what “success” means today
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    and into our date of social expiration,
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    I’ve realised that my job
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    is not to write screenplays or direct films,
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    , my job is to fabricate stories.
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    It’s a job that might
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    seem useless but actually,
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    , storytelling is the best way that we,
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    humans, have found to survive.

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    Tonight,
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    if we’ve all come onto this stage
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    to talk to you for 15 minutes one after the other
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    it’s because the best way
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    to convey an idea is to do it with a story.
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    In 2018 we could have made
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    a pdf with each TED Talk’s main idea
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    summed up in one sentence
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    and we could have emailed it to you.
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    Really, we could have done it.
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    It would have cost you less money,
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    and it would have taken us less time.

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    But the power of messages
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    we are trying to share
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    would have evaporated.
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    We know it and you know it.
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    And that’s why you are here tonight
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    , to listen to stories that might open
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    a world of possibilities.
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    In 1944,
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    Professors Fritz Heider and Marianne Simmel
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    conducted a test.
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    They showed a video
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    to a group of students
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    and asked them to answer
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    a series of questions
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    to describe what they had seen.

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    I’m going to show you 15 seconds of the video,
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    it’s going to be quick
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    but I invite you to try
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    to answer this question:
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    “What am I seeing on the screen?”
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    That was 15 seconds.
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    When they reviewed the questionnaires,
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    Heidel and Simmel discovered
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    that 33 out of the 34 students
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    had fabricated a story.
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    They had imputed motives,
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    emotions, and behaviours
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    to the geometrical figures
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    that were randomly moving
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    through space that you just saw.

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    This study was
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    one of the first scientific study
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    study that confirmed that our brain
Titre:
Comment devient-on une bonne histoire ? | Nathalie Sejean | TEDxReims
Description:

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Langue de la vidéo:
French
Équipe:
closed TED
Projet :
TEDxTalks
Durée:
17:20

sous-titres en English

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