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F for Fake (1973) - How to Structure a Video Essay

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    Hi my name is Tony and
    this is Every Frame a Painting.
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    So this channel’s been going well,
    which means it’s about time
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    -Time for a confession?
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    Yeah, time for a confession.
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    I have stolen more ideas from
    this film than from any other
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    -F for Fake
    -F for Fake
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    -Ladies and gentlemen,
    by way of introduction
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    -this is a film about trickery
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    -and fraud
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    -about lies.
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    Wait sorry I’m doing this wrong.
    Can we start over?
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    This is an essay film by Orson Welles.
    It’s called F for Fake.
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    And it's one of my personal bibles.
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    Everything I know about editing,
    I learned from this film.
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    But today, I want to talk about
    one basic thing:
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    -We found out this really simple rule
    that maybe you have all heard before
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    -but it took us a long time to learn it.
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    When you’re structuring a video essay
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    there’s one thing
    you really want to avoid.
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    -I think that’s about it.
    -And then?
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    -No, that’s it.
    -And then?
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    -Then nothing else cuz I’m done ordering
    -And then?
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    -If you tell a story that’s
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    -you’re in big trouble.
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    This is the #1 mistake
    I make in my own work.
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    Like here.
    Watch how repetitive this is.
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    -Choosing to take the money.
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    -Choosing not to fight back.
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    -Choosing to hide their emotions.
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    -Choosing not to trust someone.
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    -Choosing to wait out the discomfort.
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    -Choosing to get--
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    This is a list you could put
    in any order. That’s why it’s so boring.
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    -What should happen between
    every beat that you’ve written down
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    -is either the word
    THEREFORE or BUT.
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    -So what i'm saying is you come up
    with an idea that's like, this happens
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    -What are those?
    -My pubes. I got em from Scott Tenorman.
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    -and THEREFORE this happens.
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    -Cartman, you don’t buy pubes.
    You grow them yourself.
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    -You're saying pubes are worth nothing?
    -Yeah.
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    -BUT this happens.
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    -And I’ll give you the pubes.
    -Sweet.
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    -THEREFORE this happens.
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    -Aw goddamn it!
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    So throughout this movie,
    Orson Welles does the exact same thing.
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    Except he doesn’t connect scenes,
    he connects thoughts.
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    -You’re a painter.
    Why do you want people to do fakes?
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    -Because fakes are as good as the real
    ones and there’s a market and a demand
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    -If you didn’t have an art market,
    then fakers could not exist.
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    Even though this movie is an essay
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    each moment has the connective logic
    of a South Park episode.
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    The second rule in this movie is to have
    more than one story, moving in parallel
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    -I’ll quote Hitchcock again. He said
    the name of making movies is
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    -He’s absolutely right.
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    -You want to have two things going.
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    -You reach the peak of one,
    you go to the other.
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    -I hope you know what you’re doing.
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    -You pick the other up where you want it
    When it loses interest, drop it.
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    How does this work in an essay film?
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    -Well, let’s say you have two stories.
    Let one of them build up.
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    -When it reaches peak interest,
    switch to the other. Let this one build.
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    -And when this gets to the top,
    go back to the first. Simple, right?
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    -Except F for Fake doesn’t
    just have two things.
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    There's also stories about
    Orson Welles, Howard Hughes
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    a woman named Oja,
    and even the making of this movie.
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    And by building each story carefully,
    Welles can jump between all six of these
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    without ever losing the audience.
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    So when I’m making a video essay,
    this is what’s going through my head.
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    -And then?
    -No "and then!"
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    And I got all of that
    from watching this film.
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    Which more than anything has taught me:
    it’s not about what you get.
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    It’s how you cut it and
    what comes out the other end.
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    Remember, video essays aren’t essays.
    They’re films.
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    So you want to structure and
    pace them like a filmmaker would.
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    Therefore and But.
    Meanwhile, back at the ranch.
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    And if you don’t believe me,
    you should at least trust Orson Welles
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    who somehow figured this out
    over 40 years ago.
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    -Why not?
    I’m a charlatan.
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    But whatever. Let’s wrap up this essay.
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    -Now it’s time for an introduction.
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    Hi, my name is Tony and this concludes
    Year One of Every Frame a Painting.
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    I’d like to thank you for watching.
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    -and wish you all a very pleasant
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    -good evening.
Titre:
F for Fake (1973) - How to Structure a Video Essay
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Langue de la vidéo:
English
Durée:
04:32

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