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'Runa Kuti, urban natives'

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    Runa Kuti, urban indigenous
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    I consider myself from the native people Colla
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    Descendant of Mbya Guaraní nation
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    I am daughter of Quechuas
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    [singing] Pachamama mother earth
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    [singing] don't eat me...
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    From a Mapuche root
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    [singing] Look that i'm still young, and i have to leave seed
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    [singing] hearts, don't forget me, don't forget me
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    [singing] Pachamama, mother earth, don't eat me yet
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    My name is Sandra Barrientos Callamullo
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    my father, my mother, they are from Potosí, south of Bolivia
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    precisely from a place called Chaquí
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    i belong to the Quechua-Aymara culture
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    i'm the oldest sister of 3, we are 3 sisters
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    we were born here in Argentina
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    we are te first generation born here in Argentina
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    My parents came as many people who emigrates to the big cities
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    looking for that "progress" they were educated with
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    in the place they came from
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    Both my sisters and I lived the first period of our childhood in Villas (poor villages)
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    nothing, this is unbelievable...
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    And these things that parents do in order to protect us
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    that was part part of our history that did not tell us, that we lived there for a while
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    among other things they have done to protect us, such as...
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    not transmit the language
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    not teach us to speak Qechua
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    that's what my parents and my grandparents always spoke
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    I understand them now
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    that at that time they...
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    they tough that if they don't teach us the language, the accent was not going to stick to us
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    and the people were not going to treat us badly
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    but it was an appearance matter
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    the insults, the bad ways... it was really clear
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    not need for them to hear you talk
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    they look at you, and already they treat you bad
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    This one is from Potosí, this is my grandmother's house
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    already in Potosi city
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    not in the countrie side
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    this is my grandfather, this one my grandmother
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    You know how she was up and down with that 'aguayo'?
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    she would come and go just like that
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    Look at Ren, when he was little
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    here my sister, me, Diego
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    As a result of being in Bolivia and the north, meeting with people,
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    and the people's behave that... don't have no comparison
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    it was a different look and different treatment from the people here
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    so you relate with the people in other ways
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    and you find yourself in another way
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    and you say... wow! i never lived this!
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    or maybe i did with mom, dad, the uncles and no one else
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    but not in the streets, in the daily life
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    that was different
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    in that moment something happend, i start to realize
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    what i lived when i was child
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    and how you grow up approving situations that are not good
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    you go naturalizing and normalizing violent living codes
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    so this reinforced also the fact of...
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    of assuming the identity from another point of view
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    start to... love yourself a little bit more
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    that's the way
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    and at the same time go healing wounds as well
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    This is the planisphere with the real proportions
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    At that time it was like starting to... little by little... to see the way
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    is like the first stage of the process of...
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    i don't know how to say it...
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    identification, self-identification...
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    [car pass by]
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    but there was that stage
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    and then the other things comes
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    it's like the strenghtening stage
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    firts it's to know... start to know
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    and then from being doing the activities feel part of it
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    What will cost them to get out and speak with us?
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    I'm Valentin Palma Callamullo, from La Matanza
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    i'm a Quechua descendent
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    Buenos Aires is seen as the Paris of the south, the Paris from Latin America
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    a place without history, where spanish people came to do nothing
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    a couple of persons that resisted and that's it
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    and they was... according to the official story they was exterminated
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    growing up here, it's a little bit difficult
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    the society maybe in some cases
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    a bit discriminatory, maybe a bit xenophobic
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    and they make you feel different
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    and when you are a child, a teenager, you are more vulnerable
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    and you try to hide it, to hide some things because
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    they point at you or they say
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    "bolita", "paraguayan", "chilote" stuff like that
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    or "shitty black"
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    If I speak with my grandparents in Quechua
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    or I say to them that I want to learn
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    they would laugh, they tought I was jocking with them
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    maybe it is naturalized that you don´t have to
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    some things, maybe for the oldest
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    there is no need
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    maybe them already have that, they are peasants not indigenous
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    they don't recognized themselves
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    the interesting for me is, that in my family they can start to feel proud
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    of being indigenous descendent, of being indigenous
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    as in society is also difficult sometimes, a slow process
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    in the family as well
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    maybe to be crossed by the catholicism
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    because after all, we are all crossed
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    by five centuries of a western subjectivity, individualism
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    that prevailed here, or that tries to prevail
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    so, we all have contradictions
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    but the good thing is to identify them and slowly begin to recover the other thing
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    the most important thing
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    (police's sirens)
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    I came here to do my job
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    they warn me, there is a call from
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    to defend our rights to do an indigenous ceremony here
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    where there are remains of our ancestors
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    like there are remains below that private neighborhood that were buried under that private neighborhood
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    we do not make any complaint to them
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    because we know what is the law in this country
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    that is a kind of law that protects the private property
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    not the rights of the people who lived here before these laws came
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    before the ones you work with
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    let's get into legal issues, do you want to come with me?
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    come on, here is a public road that reaches the other side
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    where the people walk
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    (radio) "because now in the fields and the mountains of America"
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    (radio) "in the slopes of the hills"
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    (radio) "in the plains and jungles"
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    (radio) "between loneliness or city traffic"
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    (radio) "on the shores of the great oceans and rivers"
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    (radio) "the world is beginning to shake"
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    Ha'e peme'e, che réra Dario, che Mbyá Guaraní
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    Hello everyone, my name is Darío and I'm a Mbyá Guarani's descendant
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    (radio) "500 years ago fooled"
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    (radio) "by some and by others"
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    (radio) "the history will have to count with the America's poor people"
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    (radio) "with the exploited and spurned of Latin America"
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    (radio) "that has decided to start writing themselves, forever, their own history"
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    I was born in Buenos Aires but I didn't lived my childhood there
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    when I was 3 months old, I was already traveling to Misiones
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    I always say as a joke, at 3 months old I was a political exile
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    my entire childhoos was in the mount
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    so, there is a conexion with the mount, with the energy that the jungle has
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    I grew up with that
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    and then, always connected to the rock
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    all my teenage years were very connected with this kind of music
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    with friends who always were in rock and metal scene
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    when I was 20 years old, because family issues, I came by myself to live in Buenos Aires
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    it was a quite strong change, because the city where I used to lived
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    called "El Dorado"
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    was a very humble neighborhood, really small
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    in comparasion of living in a big metropolis such as Buenos Aires
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    it was shocking
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    after a while, living in Buenos Aires
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    I started to research about native peoples
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    but it was just a matter of interest
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    I wanted to know what they thought, I even spoke in past tense
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    what they believed, what they had in mind
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    and when I was finding out a little more
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    I realize that there were some things of native peoples
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    that were not wrote in the books
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    and even the people would tell you about native peoples and there were missing things
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    so, because I always traveled to Misiones
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    at least, two or three times a year I do
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    because a spiritual need, I could say
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    I need to intern myself a while in the mount
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    I found out that what I have to do is go and get into an indigenous community
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    so, I took my bag and went
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    I got into the community, I introduce myself
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    I was welcome
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    a community called Yeyé, wich in spanish means Palmitos
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    obviously my head made a terrible turn because
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    I found that there was lots more about this matter
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    - and because is you -
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    I think I was more interested in activism, see more about this peoples
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    I wanted to get involved more in this subject
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    and I start to take part, to connect with the people that was
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    in the most political part, if you want to say it
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    or more specific claims as the land issue, the security issue
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    health issues, this a bit more... serious
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    I think we should also have a spiritual independence
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    become independent of the spiritual terrorism that the catholic system has being doing along all this years
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    what they are doing, I would called it spiritual terrorism
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    And at the time, my mother asked me, what I was doing with the indigenous matters
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    Because I knew she had her bad... her experience from what the 76's dictatorship was
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    I didn't want to tell her a lot, not to scare
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    and I told her: look, most of them, are cultural activities
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    we talk about indigenous customs
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    And she said to me: I asked you, because the parents of your grandmother were indigenous
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    And I say to her: are you telling me that part of my blood is indigenous?
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    and she said: yes, your grandmother and her parents were indigenous, from Guaranies
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    So... i was someone searching something that already had
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    seems crazy to tell it this way, but I was looking for little pieces, putting together something that was already made
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    I'm Argentinian, born here in Argentina, but my mother and father are Bolivian.
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    I'm Pedro, Pedro, just Pedro, another one in this world
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    Something happend to me that unfortunately happens to everybody in the life,
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    my mother gone, died.
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    Being walking and remembering I had a very deep and personal question:
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    How do I continued the relationship between my mother and I after that?
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    Amazingly in the middle of the hills I was walking around and kicking stones
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    I think I gave myself the best answer to my own question
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    why not do what she always did?
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    Why not to continue with the things she did... in the way she walked?
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    and then I remembered that she had never left, since I have memory,
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    to make her ceremony to Mother Earth.
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    So instead of closing my door because I was a little more alone,
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    I opened my door and there began to come kids from the neighborhood
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    I started to try to be useful to the community with a small place to give food to the poors in the weekend
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    and I was thinking how I would continue the way of my mother about their culture
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    and their traditions and their cosmovision...
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    And in that time i told to the kids that were coming there:
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    look, is about 1 August and I wanted to do a ceremony for Mother Earth
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    and logical kids when they are young, they have no prejudice
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    They said, what is it?. I tell them we will make a meal,
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    we will share with each otjer and we will make an offering to Mother Earth
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    and the kids said: yeah, yeah let's do, let's do
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    and this was the begging of my cultural roots rescue's story
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    This library began more or less in the early 90's.
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    At first it was on that corner, a pile of books and magazines with papers
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    and a group of guys with who we started doing crafts,
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    I wasn't a craftsman either, I didn't know, but trying to entertain them
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    and give them something they could use and that they could be helpful with,
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    I started to learn, and that makes us appreciate all that surrounds us
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    and that's what today I would say from the small library
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    that yes, in part I humbly think, I'm succeeding, to convey that,
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    to show the world view of indigenous peoples.
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    Teach this, show this
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    to the kids, starts to encourage them to realize and respect the culture of the fathers and mothers,
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    but sometimes older people comes too
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    and talking about this, perhaps is a way I might...
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    or I tell them how myself now, older, I start to realize this,
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    and they begin to think back, to remember their parents, their grandparents
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    and they start to recover their identity.
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    One day, at the University of
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    I studied at the University of the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo
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    and one day a colleague told me about this and the following Saturday we came
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    That was almost a year ago, in March 2010
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    and then I came and well ... and I could not go
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    I began to be here a couple of days until I left everything there and I came to live here
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    The oldest do not understand yet.
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    is contradictory because they keep traditions of indigenous culture,
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    even though this pierced by Catholicism, retain several things that
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    perhaps unknowingly ... and being the closest to that
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    and like that, maybe they do not understand sometimes
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    the younger, cousins or uncles they do realize
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    because the place is very strong,
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    I mean, not only the nature or being facing to something so disgusting like these
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    is mostly connected with the history of the place,
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    and without being esoteric mysticism or anything, it feels,
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    There is an energy in the place
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    We try to take only what is on the surface
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    what is kind of burried we don´t take it out
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    but the reality is that after the water comes and takes it all.
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    When this gets lower you can walk around
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    Here I am seeing a lot more of pieces
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    There are plenty. See beneath the landfill
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    Yes, some people calls me Pablo, the indian
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    About ten years now that I am participate in an alternative media, Indymedia
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    working with news of native people.
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    What we are asking is that this part of the lands that were sold
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    make a reversal of entrepreneurship of the private neighborhood
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    to remain as a public space which claims to indigenous peoples,
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    to protect archaeological remains that are in this place,
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    remaining open place to use as it has been used for decades
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    This will mean to make the first claim to the indigenous peoples of Buenos Aires
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    rigjt outside of the Capital.
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    We are trying to make is that, by retrieving this place, it begins to speak,
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    serve as a trigger to think Buenos Aires in other ways
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    to raise awareness throug all the population living in Buenos Aires
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    that the history of this place is not what we have been taught since childhood.
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    Where is Pablich? ... Pablich ...
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    New shirt, new shoes, hairstyle, tie, trousers, they have everything
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    They arrived when the machines began to build that
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    and after, the peole came
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    the people who speaks english and live inside
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    They are yankees priest from Arizona.
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    I think is a paradox how the come
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    500 years ago they came with the cross and the sword from Spain
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    and today, the come with the bulldozers and the cross from United States
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    in versions of those places
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    Is the same history, like a spanish poet said
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    "Some people read ten centuries of history and closes the book because it is always the same"
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    but the good thing is that in this story there is always another story, which is not told,
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    the voice of the vanquished, supposedly
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    that slowly is beginning to be heard
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    and to be visible
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    [singing] The days are passing, the nights are going
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    [singing] The days are passing, the nights are going
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    [singing] my youth fading like flowers of the field
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    [singing] Oh, I am so sad, I feel like crying
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    [singing] remembering those moments that we were very happy
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    [singing] Oh, I am so sad, I feel like crying
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    [singing] remembering those moments that we were very happy
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    [singing] they say, say, say that you want me
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    [singing] they say, say, say that you love me
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    [singing] If you want me, why you don´t kiss me?
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    [singing] If you want me, why you don´t hug me?
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    [singing] they say, say, say that you want me
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    [singing] they say, say, say that you love me
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    [singing] If you want me, why you don´t kiss me?
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    [singing] If you want me, why you don´t hug me?
Título:
'Runa Kuti, urban natives'
Descripción:

Translation of the Argentinean subtitles of the documentary 'Runa Kuti, urban natives'.

Synopsis
Thousands of Argentinians descending from originating cultures live in Buenos Aires, city which historically has forgotten the pre-existence and existence of these peoples. Four people in this situation narrate how it is to grow in a family and social environment that denies them their roots and culture; they also tell of their personal struggles to rediscover themselves and strengthen bonds through cultural activities. In this search, the four ways come together through a world vision of the originating people; putting out an invitation to reflect on consciousness and the relationship of humanity with nature.

You can see the complete documentary in

http://vimeo.com/37754616

http://runakuti.blogspot.com/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Runa-Kuti-ind%C3%ADgenas-urbanos/267868453226635

Team
Directing and editing: Paola Castaño Londoño and Dailos Batista Suárez
Production: Angela Guerrero and Jacqueline Balfour
Assistant to Production and Sound: Daniela Peña
Dirección de Fotografía: Antonela Vita
Music: Sandra Barrientos Callamulo

Participation in Film Festivals
Official selection FECICO 2011 (Buenos Aires)
http://fecico2011.blogspot.com/
Official selection VI Festival transterritorial de Cine Underground (Buenos Aires)
http://cineunder.wordpress.com/
Official selection 1r Festival Nacional de Cine Indigena en Patagonia (Neuquen)
http://cineindigena.com.ar/
Official selection Underpy Fest, V Festival de Cine Under de Paraguay (Asunción)
http://cineunderparaguay.blogspot.com/
Official selection BAIn, 1ra Muestra de Cine Buenos Aires Indígena
http://bain2011.blogspot.com/
Participation in the Creative Commons Film Festival of Buenos Aires
http://www.ccbue.com.ar/
Official selection in the 3ra Muestra Internacional de Cine Documental DOCSTOWN (México)
http://docstown.blogspot.com.ar/

Technical Details
Genre: Documentary
Original Format: PAL 16:9
Duration: 39 minutos
Country of Production: Argentina
Date of Production: May - July 2011

Runa Kuti is registered under a Creative Commons license because we believe that culture should be free to be shared. Because we all do it and the copyright law is not yet capable of adapting to the new cultural practices.

You are free to:
Share - copy, distribute, execute and distribute this work publicly
Under the following conditions:

Attribution-- You must attribute Runa Kuti to Paola Castaño and Dailos Batista.
Non- commercial— This work cannot be used for commercial purposes.
No Derivative works -- It can't be altered, transformed or derive any new work from this.

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Video Language:
Spanish, Argentinian

Subtítulos en English

Incompleto

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