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'Runa Kuti, urban natives'

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    Runa Kuti, urban indigenous
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    I consider myself from the native people Colla
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    Descendant of Mbya Guaraní nation
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    I am daughter of Quechuas
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    [singing] Pachamama mother earth
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    [singing] don't eat me...
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    From a Mapuche root
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    [singing] Look that i'm still young, and i have to leave seed
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    [singing] hearts, don't forget me, don't forget me
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    [singing] Pachamama, mother earth, don't eat me yet
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    My name is Sandra Barrientos Callamullo
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    my father, my mother, they are from Potosí, south of Bolivia
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    precisely from a place called Chaquí
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    i belong to the Quechua-Aymara culture
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    i'm the oldest sister of 3, we are 3 sisters
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    we were born here in Argentina
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    we are te first generation born here in Argentina
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    My parents came as many people who emigrates to the big cities
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    looking for that "progress" they were educated with
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    in the place they came from
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    Both my sisters and I lived the first period of our childhood in Villas (poor villages)
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    nothing, this is unbelievable...
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    And these things that parents do in order to protect us
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    that was part part of our history that did not tell us, that we lived there for a while
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    among other things they have done to protect us, such as...
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    not transmit the language
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    not teach us to speak Qechua
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    that's what my parents and my grandparents always spoke
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    I understand them now
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    that at that time they...
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    they tough that if they don't teach us the language, the accent was not going to stick to us
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    and the people were not going to treat us badly
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    but it was an appearance matter
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    the insults, the bad ways... it was really clear
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    not need for them to hear you talk
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    they look at you, and already they treat you bad
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    This one is from Potosí, this is my grandmother's house
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    already in Potosi city
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    not in the countrie side
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    this is my grandfather, this one my grandmother
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    You know how she was up and down with that 'aguayo'?
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    she would come and go just like that
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    Look at Ren, when he was little
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    here my sister, me, Diego
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    As a result of being in Bolivia and the north, meeting with people,
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    and the people's behave that... don't have no comparison
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    it was a different look and different treatment from the people here
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    so you relate with the people in other ways
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    and you find yourself in another way
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    and you say... wow! i never lived this!
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    or maybe i did with mom, dad, the uncles and no one else
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    but not in the streets, in the daily life
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    that was different
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    in that moment something happend, i start to realize
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    what i lived when i was child
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    and how you grow up approving situations that are not good
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    you go naturalizing and normalizing violent living codes
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    so this reinforced also the fact of...
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    of assuming the identity from another point of view
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    start to... love yourself a little bit more
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    that's the way
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    and at the same time go healing wounds as well
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    This is the planisphere with the real proportions
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    At that time it was like starting to... little by little... to see the way
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    is like the first stage of the process of...
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    i don't know how to say it...
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    identification, self-identification...
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    [car pass by]
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    but there was that stage
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    and then the other things comes
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    it's like the strenghtening stage
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    firts it's to know... start to know
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    and then from being doing the activities feel part of it
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    What will cost them to get out and speak with us?
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    I'm Valentin Palma Callamullo, from La Matanza
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    i'm a Quechua descendent
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    Buenos Aires is seen as the Paris of the south, the Paris from Latin America
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    a place without history, where spanish people came to do nothing
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    a couple of persons that resisted and that's it
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    and they was... according to the official story they was exterminated
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    growing up here, it's a little bit difficult
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    the society maybe in some cases
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    a bit discriminatory, maybe a bit xenophobic
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    and they make you feel different
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    and when you are a child, a teenager, you are more vulnerable
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    and you try to hide it, to hide some things because
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    they point at you or they say
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    "bolita", "paraguayan", "chilote" stuff like that
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    or "shitty black"
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    If I speak with my grandparents in Quechua
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    or I say to them that I want to learn
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    they would laugh, they tought I was jocking with them
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    maybe it is naturalized that you don´t have to
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    some things, maybe for the oldest
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    there is no need
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    maybe them already have that, they are peasants not indigenous
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    they don't recognized themselves
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    the interesting for me is, that in my family they can start to feel proud
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    of being indigenous descendent, of being indigenous
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    as in society is also difficult sometimes, a slow process
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    in the family as well
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    maybe to be crossed by the catholicism
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    because after all, we are all crossed
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    by five centuries of a western subjectivity, individualism
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    that prevailed here, or that tries to prevail
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    so, we all have contradictions
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    but the good thing is to identify them and slowly begin to recover the other thing
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    the most important thing
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    (police's sirens)
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    I came here to do my job
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    they warn me, there is a call from
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    to defend our rights to do an indigenous ceremony here
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    where there are remains of our ancestors
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    like there are remains below that private neighborhood that were buried under that private neighborhood
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    we do not make any complaint to them
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    because we know what is the law in this country
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    that is a kind of law that protects the private property
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    not the rights of the people who lived here before these laws came
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    before the ones you work with
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    let's get into legal issues, do you want to come with me?
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    come on, here is a public road that reaches the other side
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    where the people walk
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    (radio) "because now in the fields and the mountains of America"
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    (radio) "in the slopes of the hills"
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    (radio) "in the plains and jungles"
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    (radio) "between loneliness or city traffic"
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    (radio) "on the shores of the great oceans and rivers"
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    (radio) "the world is beginning to shake"
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    Ha'e peme'e, che réra Dario, che Mbyá Guaraní
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    Hello everyone, my name is Darío and I'm a Mbyá Guarani's descendant
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    (radio) "500 years ago fooled"
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    (radio) "by some and by others"
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    (radio) "the history will have to count with the America's poor people"
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    (radio) "with the exploited and spurned of Latin America"
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    (radio) "that has decided to start writing themselves, forever, their own history"
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    I was born in Buenos Aires but I didn't lived my childhood there
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    when I was 3 months old, I was already traveling to Misiones
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    I always say as a joke, at 3 months old I was a political exile
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    my entire childhoos was in the mount
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    so, there is a conexion with the mount, with the energy that the jungle has
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    I grew up with that
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    and then, always connected to the rock
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    all my teenage years were very connected with this kind of music
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    with friends who always were in rock and metal scene
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    when I was 20 years old, because family issues, I came by myself to live in Buenos Aires
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    it was a quite strong change, because the city where I used to lived
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    called "El Dorado"
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    was a very humble neighborhood, really small
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    in comparasion of living in a big metropolis such as Buenos Aires
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    it was shocking
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    after a while, living in Buenos Aires
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    I started to research about native peoples
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    but it was just a matter of interest
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    I wanted to know what they thought, I even spoke in past tense
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    what they believed, what they had in mind
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    and when I was finding out a little more
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    I realize that there were some things of native peoples
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    that were not wrote in the books
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    and even the people would tell you about native peoples and there were missing things
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    so, because I always traveled to Misiones
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    at least, two or three times a year I do
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    because a spiritual need, I could say
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    I need to intern myself a while in the mount
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    I found out that what I have to do is go and get into an indigenous community
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    so, I took my bag and went
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    I got into the community, I introduce myself
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    I was welcome
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    a community called Yeyé, wich in spanish means Palmitos
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    obviously my head made a terrible turn because
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    I found that there was lots more about this matter
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    - and because is you -
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    I think I was more interested in activism, see more about this peoples
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    I wanted to get involved more in this subject
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    and I start to take part, to connect with the people that was
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    in the most political part, if you want to say it
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    or more specific claims as the land issue, the security issue
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    health issues, this a bit more... serious
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    I think we should also have a spiritual independence
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    become independent of the spiritual terrorism that the catholic system has being doing along all this years
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    what they are doing, I would called it spiritual terrorism
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    And at the time, my mother asked me, what I was doing with the indigenous matters
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    Because I knew she had her bad... her experience from what the 76's dictatorship was
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    I didn't want to tell her a lot, not to scare
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    and I told her: look, most of them, are cultural activities
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    we talk about indigenous customs
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    And she said to me: I asked you, because the parents of your grandmother were indigenous
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    And I say to her: are you telling me that part of my blood is indigenous?
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    and she said: yes, your grandmother and her parents were indigenous, from Guaranies
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    So... i was someone searching something that already had
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    seems crazy to tell it this way, but I was looking for little pieces, putting together something that was already made
Título:
'Runa Kuti, urban natives'
Descripción:

Transcripción del audio en Castellano de Argentina del documental 'Runa Kuti, indígenas urbanos'.

Versión completa liberada del documental argentino Runa Kuti, participante en 9 festivales de cine hasta el momento. Lo podés descargar en versión de baja calidad abajo a la derecha. Para versión en alta calidad o una copia del DVD con los extras contactar con docoriginarios@gmail.com

Sinopsis
Miles de argentinos descendientes de culturas originarias viven en Buenos Aires, ciudad que históricamente ha olvidado la preexistencia y existencia de estos pueblos. Cuatro personas en esta situación nos narran como es crecer en un ambiente familiar y social que les niega sus raíces y su cultura; además, cuentan su lucha personal para reencontrarse y fortalecer vínculos a través de actividades culturales. En esta búsqueda los cuatro caminos se unen a través de la cosmovisión de los pueblos originarios; haciendo una invitación a reflexionar sobre la conciencia, y la relación de la humanidad con la naturaleza.

www.runakuti.blogspot.com/
facebook.com/pages/Runa-Kuti-ind%C3%ADgenas-urbanos/267868453226635

Equipo
Dirección y montaje: Paola Castaño Londoño y Dailos Batista Suárez
Producción: Angela Guerrero y Jacqueline Balfour
Asistencia de Producción y Sonido: Daniela Peña
Dirección de Fotografía: Antonela Vita
Música: Sandra Barrientos Callamulo

Runa Kuti está registrado con licencia Creative Commons, porque creemos que la cultura debe ser libre de poder ser compartida. Porque todxs lo hacemos y la ley del copyright todavía no es capaz de adaptarse a las nuevas prácticas culturales.

Usted es libre de:
Compartir - copiar, distribuir, ejecutar y comunicar públicamente la obra.

Bajo las condiciones siguientes:
Atribución — Debe atribuir Runa Kuti a Paola Castaño y Dailos Batista.
No Comercial — No puede utilizar esta obra para fines comerciales.
Sin Obras Derivadas — No se puede alterar, transformar o generar una obra derivada a partir de esta obra.

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Video Language:
Spanish, Argentinian

Subtítulos en English

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