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IOOW Part 1

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    My name is Kiran, I am the chair of In Our
    Own Words
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    and a health psychologist by background.
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    And I am Rachel and I have recently come
    on board with In Our Own words and I am
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    newly qualified as a clinical psychologist
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    It’s nice to meet you all by the way.
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    So just to explain what In Our Own Words
    is.
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    It is a wiki essentially, to
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    build up a knowledge resource around
    distress, suffering, pain fatigue, those
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    kind of symptoms or experiences people
    might struggle with from ethnic minorities
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    as they may describe them in everyday
    terms.
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    So moving away from clinical disorders
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    and moving away from looking at the
    Western equivalents of anxiety and
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    depression, but really looking at how
    people describe it in an everyday sense
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    in order to try and help people to get
    earlier access to support
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    when they need it from psychological
    services.
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    And as part of that we are building a
    resource section
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    for different communities under different
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    languages where we link to papers- sorry,
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    not papers-research done by different
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    researchers, you know, trainee
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    psychologists, early career psychologists,
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    with ethnic minorities around
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    some of their sense-making when they have
    mental and physical health difficulties,
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    particularly work that might not have been
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    published before.
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    [Rachel] This is often called a preprint
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    [Kiran] That's it, yeah
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    [Rachel] When I was possibly thinking
    about publishing my thesis
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    so yeah it's basically a term in academic
    publishing which is like a version of
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    your scientific paper that precedes a
    formal peer review and actually
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    it doesn't have to, a formal peer review
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    doesn't have to follow on. And you can
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    just complete a dissertation
    or a piece of work, or a even a service
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    evaluation for example, and you can-
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    there's a number of places you can upload
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    them. Yeah and you, and you make
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    the pre-print available, how it's
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    described [the process]. People can view
    hat, it's searchable, people can download
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    it. And yeah, others go on to publish it.
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    Yep. And One of the nice things about it
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    is you can actually see how many people
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    download your paper and you can create
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    citable links of your research paper from
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    there. Erm so we'll talk a bit about who
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    might actually benefit from this, and talk
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    about some of the caveats, like who
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    might not be so-who might want to think
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    about it before they share their pre-
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    prints with us. And so, this is possibly
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    going to appeal more to people who train
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    and go in to practicing, erm psychology in
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    applied settings, clinical settings so for
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    example, erm clinical psychologists,
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    counselling psychologists and perhaps some
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    practitioner health psychologists, you
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    know, amongst some others. The
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    reason why we say that is that there's
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    less pressure to publish in academic
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    outlets when you are oriented towards
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    those services because-and that-that is an
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    advantage because, some journals-a number
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    of journals don't really accept pre-prints
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    or you know reviewers may comment that
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    this-that this has been a pre print else-
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    where and that can actually impede chances
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    of success at those journals. On the
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    other hand some open access journals that
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    tend to be, you know, higher impact or
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    you know, harder to get in to as well,
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    they don’t mind having-accepting
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    pre-prints, in fact they may
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    encourage it. Erm so that-We would ask you
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    to consider that, you know before
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    uploading your work on a pre print
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    server because we don’t want to stop you
    from doing that
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    if that's-if publishing academically, if
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    that's what you want to do first. That
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    said, you know, we know it can be
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    difficult and a lot of really good work
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    never gets out there in academic journals
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    and we want to help people-make that
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    accessible, and you know get the exposure
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    and the credit they deserve for doing that
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    work. And we know that those working with
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    ethnic minorities can sometimes find it
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    really difficult to get their work
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    published in an academic outlet but
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    we really need to hear about that stuff
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    [their research].
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    [inaudible]
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    With regards to how it works on our Wiki,
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    as I say we have a resources section under
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    each language and the idea is people can
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    click through and visit and download it
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    and have a look. The first thing they
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    see is, like you know a page of terms and
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    recordings of phrases but
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    sometimes people might actually want to
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    understand a particular community more
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    and understand how they make sense of
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    you know, struggle, physical and
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    emotional struggle, and their-you know
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    when their health needs aren’t being
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    quite met, so they can either get
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    more support, you know or they can-or if
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    they are a professional, figure out how
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    to support a member of the community
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    better. Obviously we do welcome work
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    from any psychologist that has worked with
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    an ethnic minority but we are particularly
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    welcoming ethnic minority psychologists,
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    as that is part of our ethos, it's our
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    focus to try and help get ethnic minority
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    psychologists to get their work recognised
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    to counteract some of the barriers that
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    we can sometimes face as ethnic minorities
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    [Kiran] So yeah with regards-
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    [Rachel] Can I give an example?
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    [Kiran] Oh go on-
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    [Rachel] An example might be-you
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    might be a-a practicing health
    psychologist
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    Perhaps you are a few years down the line
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    after study, but actually like you had
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    a really incredible dissertation or thesis
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    that was on, for example the experiences
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    of barriers to help in the South
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    Asian community in relation to eating
    disorders
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    That-and say it was a qualitative piece
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    and you interviewed like 8 people
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    and it's-you might not have had
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    the support, the time, the energy to-
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    perhaps or the interest to go down
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    that peer review process, cos it is - as
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    Kiran said there are any barriers for
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    lots of different reasons, perhaps then
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    a preprint could be really useful cos that
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    would mean that information-that knowledge
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    can be picked up and used by
    practitioners, just by the public, by
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    people of the South Asian community
    specifically and that is exactly the
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    sort of thing we would absolutely love in
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    the resources section and we can
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    actually put that in-under the certain
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    languages that that would be-that that
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    would be relevant to, so yeah that's just
    an example.
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    [Kiran] Yeah thank you, that's always
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    helpful for people to have that, you know,
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    cos it can seem a bit abstract.
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    So when we say we link to it, a popular
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    repository that we talk about--that
    accepts a lot of preprints is called
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    PsyArXiv. We'll go over how to upload
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    things onto PsyArXiv and one of the
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    lovely things about that is that you can
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    create a permanent link which is easy to
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    publish to-well link to, also should you
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    then later on publish it, you can create a
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    link to the final published version-and
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    you can even choose whether to make it
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    private or public, update the version
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    if you choose to re-write it a little bit.
    You have all these options
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    And one of these things that we hope
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    that could happen is if we-this site
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    builds and you know becomes a real key
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    -leading resource amongst professionals
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    and service user groups, we could end up
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    attracting some editors who would love to
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    publish your work, who may approach you
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    as a result. So, that's-kind of the other
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    hope really by doing it this way, and of
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    course to make sure we credit people
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    appropriately for the work that they do.
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    So what we do particularly welcome
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    is-in terms of the types of research
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    we-we are looking for original empirical
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    research studies, qualitative, indepth
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    studies with an ethnic minority
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    participant group and sometimes
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    quantitative measures, to see where
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    someone might be struggling with their
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    physical or mental health as that can help
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    [to] identify people in clinical practice
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    who might need some support, so those are
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    the kind of the studies that we're
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    looking for. So if that you know sounds
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    like it might be of relevance to you-I'm
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    just gonna check that I haven't missed
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    anything [laughs]- if that sounds like
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    it could be something you would
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    be interested in, and you know
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    you'd like to hear more and see more of
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    our projects then, you know you're more
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    than welcome and we'd love to hear
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    from you.
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    Thank you-thank you very much for your
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    attention and we look forward to speaking
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    to you soon.
Title:
IOOW Part 1
Video Language:
English, British
Duration:
11:33
Everlasting_curiosity edited English, British subtitles for IOOW Part 1
Everlasting_curiosity edited English, British subtitles for IOOW Part 1
Everlasting_curiosity edited English, British subtitles for IOOW Part 1
Everlasting_curiosity edited English, British subtitles for IOOW Part 1
Everlasting_curiosity edited English, British subtitles for IOOW Part 1
Everlasting_curiosity edited English, British subtitles for IOOW Part 1
Everlasting_curiosity edited English, British subtitles for IOOW Part 1
Everlasting_curiosity edited English, British subtitles for IOOW Part 1
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