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Complete Guide into Belay Devices - Differences and Efficient Usage | Ep.6

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    Belaying devices.
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    There are so many different
    belaying devices
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    nowadays on the market and in my hands.
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    And after this video you will be able
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    to pick any of them.
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    Not from my hands.
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    And you will know how it works
    and how to use it.
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    So first of all, a belaying device
    is simply a mechanism
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    which allows to control
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    the friction between your hand
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    and the climber.
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    Alright.
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    So here I hang and here I have almost
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    60 kilograms of force pulling
    on this strand of the rope.
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    However for me to hold that
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    I'm only using about 6 to 7
    kilograms of force
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    on the brake side of the rope.
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    However if I would start raising
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    my brake hand up
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    the force needed to hold that
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    goes to 9 kilograms of force...
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    10...
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    12...
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    15...
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    So my max was around 25 kilograms of force
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    with two hands in this position.
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    That means that in this position
    at this angle
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    I can not even hold my own weight
    with two hands.
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    There is no even talking about one hand.
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    So now let's see how much
    assistance I will get
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    if my rope strands are completely
    parallel to each other.
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    So I will start pulling up
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    as hard as i can.
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    And so the answer is almost nothing.
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    Now to explain how that works
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    since there is so many
    different belaying devices
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    I'm gonna group all of them
    into different categories.
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    First one is tubular style devices.
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    That many mistakenly call them reverso.
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    Which is only this device -
    Petzl Reverso.
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    Or ATC which is this Black Diamond ATC.
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    While Mammut calls this
    Alpine Belaying Device. Simple.
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    So with tubes the more
    I move my brake hand down
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    the more it squeezes the rope between
    the carabiner and belaying device.
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    And also tubes have
    a little groove in front of them.
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    Which even further pinches on the rope.
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    Plus as I pull down on the rope
    it tilts the device
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    which creates extra angles
    and extra friction.
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    So as we saw in my previous experiment
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    if my hand is at the
    level of the belaying device or higher
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    the device creates very little friction.
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    So if the climber would fall
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    while my hand is
    in this position or higher
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    there is a high chance
    that my hand would simply
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    get sucked into the belaying device.
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    I got my hand pinched...
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    And then maybe i will hurt my hand
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    And let go off the rope.
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    So if you want to see how my hand is
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    getting sucked into belaying device
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    I already made a video about that.
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    Also worth mentioning is that
    rope thickness or diameter
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    has a huge effect on how easily
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    the rope will go through belaying device.
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    And every belaying device has a
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    recommended range of rope thicknesses
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    which you can find
    somewhere in the manuals
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    or sometimes on the device itself.
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    And this brings us to advantages
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    of tubular style devices.
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    First of all they work better with
    wider range of rope diameters.
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    All the way from super thick gym ropes
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    to ultra skinny twin ropes.
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    On contrast if you would take a GriGri
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    it says that it's optimized to work
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    from 8.9 to 10.5 millimeters ropes.
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    But from my experience
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    anything from 10 millimeters and above
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    doesn't work that well anymore.
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    Yeah, there is this older GriGri
    which works better with thicker ropes.
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    But that one doesn't work well
    with thin ropes.
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    Next, tubes are super lightweight.
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    And they allow you to belay with two ropes
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    either double ropes or twin ropes.
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    And if you don't know
    what's a double or twin rope
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    you should watch
    my master class on the ropes.
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    Also with tubes you can make a soft catch
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    without moving yourself.
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    By allowing the rope
    to slip through the device.
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    And in general tubes don't catch as hard
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    because there is always
    a little bit of slippage
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    which reduces the peak forces.
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    Which might be very beneficial
    for trad climbers.
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    Since it reduces the chance
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    that the pieces of the gear will fall out.
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    And finally tubes have
    this loop at the top.
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    And that allows you
    to set this device in a guide mode
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    in which you can even belay
    two following climbers
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    coming up on top rope simultaneously
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    simon... simultaneously.
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    and all of that are the reasons
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    why tubes are still very commonly used
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    in traditional or alpine
    or multi-pitch scenarios.
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    However none of that is really useful
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    if you're just doing
    single pitch sport climbing.
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    And the biggest disadvantage of tubes
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    is of course that they don't lock
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    meaning if you would let go the rope.
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    Which by the way brings us
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    to the main rule of belaying.
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    If you are in need of number two
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    and you have a choice to poop your pants
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    or to let go the brake side of the rope -
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    you poop your pants!
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    Meaning in no circumstances
    you're allowed to lose control
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    of the brake side of the rope.
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    And that's by the way also equally true
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    for assisted building devices
    but we are gonna talk next.
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    So assisted devices
    have an ability to lock
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    in case the climber falls.
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    Which obviously adds a lot of safety.
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    For example if you would
    knock a rock while you're climbing
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    and that rock would
    fall on your belayer's head...
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    And that's why we wear a helmet!
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    So first of all your belayer would
    really like to have a helmet.
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    But you as a climber
    would really love that
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    there would be one of these
    assisted devices down there.
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    And in fact my own skin
    was once saved by this guy.
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    When I did a little fall
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    and my belayer did not notice
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    that there was a rock next to her leg.
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    And while she was flying forward,
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    her leg got stuck, and she spun around,
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    and hit her back to the wall.
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    And let both of the hands go.
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    So this guy is basically a reason why
    I'm still here.
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    And making these videos.
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    Now super important that number two rule
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    is also applicable for these guys.
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    After all they are called assisted
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    so don't treat them as fully automatic.
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    Because there are cases
    where they will not lock.
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    Apart from safety this locking is also
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    super useful in long belays
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    If your climber is hanging
    on the rope a lot
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    and projecting some hard moves.
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    So if we compare this to the tube
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    even in the most mechanically
    advantaged position
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    you will still need to hold on the rope.
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    And in very long belays
    this will get tiring.
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    While with assisted devices
    it's pretty chill.
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    You are literally just
    sitting in your harness.
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    OK, so the first group of
    assisted belaying devices
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    is called assisted tubers.
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    That's because they look like tubes
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    and they work similarly to regular tubes
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    where we squeeze the rope
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    between the carabiner and the device.
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    Except that they have a shape
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    that shifts the carabiner in position
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    where it squeezes on the rope so hard
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    that it completely locks it off.
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    A little disadvantage of assisted tubes
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    is that once in locked position
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    you cannot quickly
    feed slack to the climber.
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    You need a special action
    to unlock the device
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    before you can feed the rope
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    For example with Click Up
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    it even clicks
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    and now I cannot do anything.
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    I literally need to unclick it.
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    And now I can continue belaying.
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    Now one really important thing
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    that not many know about assisted tubers
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    That they suffer from the same problem
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    as regular tubes
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    meaning that
    if your hand is in up position
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    the device will not lock.
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    As you can see it's not locking
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    And if the climber would take a fall
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    the rope would just slide from my hand
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    and burn it. Oh, it's already burning.
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    However unlike regular tubes
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    Where you can get your hands sucked
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    even at very big angles
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    most assisted tubers
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    will only fail at the angles
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    that are very extremely high up.
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    And some actually don't fail at all.
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    I'm actually gonna make a separate video
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    where I was experimenting
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    at which angles which devices lock.
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    So stay tuned for that.
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    I can't put everything
    into one video because
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    I need you to subscribe.
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    But independently of which
    belaying device you're using
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    just develop a habit of keeping
    your brake hand down.
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    Also good to know for people
    who climb with two ropes
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    is that there are assisted tubers
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    that work with two ropes.
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    In case you go on a multi-pitch
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    and you want extra safety
    you have some options.
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    All right let's move on to
    cam assisted devices.
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    I'm sure everybody knows GriGri.
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    But there are more devices like
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    Trango Vergo and Birdie and others.
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    And the way they work is
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    that they have a camming
    mechanism inside
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    which pinches on the rope.
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    Now in the case of GriGri
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    the cam is spring-loaded
    meaning that as soon as
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    there is no more load
    on the climber's end of the rope
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    the cam will disengage.
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    And you can belay normally.
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    While in the case of Vergo
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    it doesn't have a spring.
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    And you need to position the device
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    in a certain way
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    to be able to feed the slack.
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    All right back to GriGri.
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    If you press on GriGri's cam
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    but you ignore the rule number two
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    and you don't hold
    the break side of the rope
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    this can happen...
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    Also if you ignore rule number two
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    and your GriGri gets trapped
    in the first piece of gear
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    this can happen
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    Many of you asked
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    if this problem of
    trapping in the first bolt
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    where it disengages the cam
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    is also applicable for assisted tubers.
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    So with most assisted devices
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    the answer is unlikely.
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    Since there is no cam that i could press
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    to disengage this locking.
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    Only if i would press on this end
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    it kind of slips a bit but still
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    stays locked.
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    This Click Up
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    doesn't even lock
    if i don't hold the rope.
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    Amazing. Number two rule. Hold the rope.
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    Yeah.
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    There's no way I can unlock this
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    in this manner.
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    So no assisted tubers
    don't have this risk.
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    Now this is a little future me
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    after I was editing this part
    that you just seen.
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    And I saw this I realized that
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    I was using a wrong carabiner.
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    Turns out Click Ups need
    their own specific carabiners
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    And that's a reason why
    you should read the manual.
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    So that's the carabiner
    you should use for a Click Up.
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    Let's see if it locks.
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    No difference.
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    So number two rule.
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    And read the manual
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    because some of
    the assisted delaying devices
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    require you a specific belaying carabiner.
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    I don't know if it's just marketing
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    or the shape of the carabiner
    is slightly different.
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    Just use what the manufacturers recommend.
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    And finally there is this guy.
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    It's a Revo from Wild Country.
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    It's an inertia based mechanism.
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    Which will lock once the climber starts
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    falling faster than 4 meters per second.
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    So if i pull slowly it doesn't lock.
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    I need to pull really fast
    in order for it to lock.
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    So my goal of this video
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    is not to compare all
    of the delaying devices
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    on the market and
    tell you which one to buy.
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    Sorry for that.
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    Every device have its own
    pros and cons, haters and lovers.
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    Full internet of that.
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    However if you would want such comparison
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    let me know in the comments and maybe
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    I will make a separate video on that.
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    OK now I have a tip for you
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    that will make your life
    a little bit easier
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    and maybe will even save your ass
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    on a multi-pitch one day.
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    Humans,
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    we have two hands normally
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    and handling more than
    two objects in two hands
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    is not ideal.
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    What I often see that people
    take their belaying device,
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    their carabiner, the rope...
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    That's already three objects by the way.
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    And they try to connect everything
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    in space
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    like so...
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    Ready to belay.
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    So doing this
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    will greatly increase the chance
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    that one day you will drop something.
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    You will be trying to connect something
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    and then suddenly whoops...
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    Your belaying device flies down.
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    If you're not on a multi-pitch
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    if you're standing on the ground
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    that's not a big deal.
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    However if you drop your belaying device
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    on a multi-pitch
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    you are in big trouble.
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    So this is what you do to avoid that.
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    Normally your belaying device
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    will live with your carabiner
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    somewhere on the harness.
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    So step one.
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    You take both of them
    together as one unit.
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    So I'm carrying only one unit.
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    And you immediately connect it
    to belaying loop.
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    So you cannot drop anything right now,
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    everything is safe.
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    Step two. You take a bite of rope
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    and you insert into your belaying device.
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    Keep in mind of
    the orientation of the rope
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    which end has to go to the climber
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    which end is your break hand.
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    If you're not sure
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    every belaying device has an image
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    on the side of it.
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    Which will remind you that.
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    And next. Open your carabiner
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    and hook your rope together
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    with the belaying device.
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    So at no point there was a chance for me
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    to drop anything.
  • 15:03 - 15:05
    And once you're done belaying
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    you simply reverse the process.
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    Where you open the carabiner,
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    you unhook the rope.
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    But you hook the belaying device.
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    And then you simply can
    just pull out the rope.
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    And your belaying device stays
    on your harness with the carabiner.
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    If you want to put it somewhere else
    you put it somewhere else.
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    And the same works with assisted tubers.
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    So step one.
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    Connect your belaying device
    to your harness,
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    take a bite of rope,
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    put that bite of rope
    into belaying device,
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    open the carabiner and hook the rope
    and belaying device together.
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    Now in case of the GriGri
    it's slightly different.
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    So as always step one
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    clip your belaying device
    to your belay loop.
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    So you cannot drop anything.
  • 15:46 - 15:47
    Now if you're not on a multi-pitch
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    and dropping your GriGri
    is not a big deal
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    you simply take off your grigri,
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    open it in this cool way,
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    insert the rope, and clip it back. Simple.
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    Now if you are on a multi-pitch
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    there is a technique.
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    So this is what you do.
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    You open your carabiner
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    and hook only half of the GriGri together.
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    Then you can open the GriGri.
  • 16:11 - 16:13
    And it's connected to your carabiner.
  • 16:13 - 16:14
    You cannot drop it.
  • 16:14 - 16:15
    You insert the rope.
  • 16:15 - 16:17
    You close it.
  • 16:17 - 16:20
    And then you open your carabiner again
  • 16:20 - 16:22
    and hook the grigri back.
  • 16:22 - 16:25
    So this is as safe as you can do
    with the grigri
  • 16:25 - 16:26
    on a multi-pitch.
  • 16:26 - 16:28
    And obviously once you're done
  • 16:28 - 16:32
    it's just simply reversing the process of
  • 16:32 - 16:35
    doing this
  • 16:35 - 16:38
    and doing that.
  • 16:38 - 16:39
    OK so I hope that by now
  • 16:39 - 16:41
    I gave you enough examples
  • 16:41 - 16:43
    how not to use belaying devices.
  • 16:43 - 16:46
    And now i'm gonna show you
    proper techniques.
  • 16:46 - 16:48
    The good part is that
  • 16:48 - 16:50
    no matter what belaying device you use
  • 16:50 - 16:53
    good belaying techniques don't change.
  • 16:53 - 16:55
    There are slight differences
    that i'm gonna mention.
  • 16:55 - 16:57
    But for majority it's the same.
  • 16:57 - 16:58
    All right.
  • 16:58 - 17:00
    So I hope that by now
  • 17:00 - 17:03
    number two rule is
    strongly embedded into you.
  • 17:03 - 17:05
    However if for some reason
  • 17:05 - 17:07
    you really need to go hands-free
  • 17:07 - 17:10
    you can tie a backup knot
  • 17:10 - 17:12
    at your brake end. Like so.
  • 17:12 - 17:15
    And this is totally fine.
  • 17:15 - 17:17
    In case something happens and the rope
  • 17:17 - 17:18
    would slip all the way
  • 17:18 - 17:20
    the GriGri will lock.
  • 17:20 - 17:22
    However in the case of tube
  • 17:22 - 17:23
    it's slightly different.
  • 17:23 - 17:25
    If you would just simply
  • 17:25 - 17:27
    tie a knot here.
  • 17:27 - 17:29
    And the climber would fall.
  • 17:29 - 17:30
    There is a chance that
  • 17:30 - 17:32
    this knot will get jammed
  • 17:32 - 17:34
    in your belaying device so hard
  • 17:34 - 17:38
    that you will have trouble to unjam it.
  • 17:38 - 17:40
    Let's use a slightly different carabiner
  • 17:40 - 17:42
    so it's easier for you
    to see what's happening.
  • 17:42 - 17:45
    So in the case of tube
  • 17:45 - 17:46
    you take a bite of rope
  • 17:46 - 17:48
    and then you take another bite of rope
  • 17:48 - 17:51
    and put through the first one
  • 17:51 - 17:53
    and you make it tight.
  • 17:53 - 17:56
    And make sure that
    this loop is long enough.
  • 17:56 - 17:57
    Like so.
  • 17:57 - 17:59
    This will hold but this is not enough.
  • 17:59 - 18:02
    To make it extra safe
  • 18:02 - 18:05
    you tie in back up knot here.
  • 18:05 - 18:07
    So now i can go hands-free.
  • 18:07 - 18:09
    And in case my climber takes a fall
  • 18:09 - 18:11
    this will hold him.
  • 18:11 - 18:13
    And if i want to release all of that
  • 18:13 - 18:16
    hold the brake side of the rope,
  • 18:16 - 18:19
    untie the top backup knot,
  • 18:19 - 18:23
    and start pulling the rope
  • 18:23 - 18:25
    until you have a little loop left.
  • 18:25 - 18:27
    At this point inform your climber that
  • 18:27 - 18:28
    he might
  • 18:28 - 18:30
    feel a little bump
  • 18:30 - 18:32
    and tug fast.
  • 18:32 - 18:34
    Like so. If you do this correctly
  • 18:34 - 18:36
    your climber will not go down at all.
  • 18:36 - 18:41
    Now if you're not familiar
    with slip slap slap...
  • 18:41 - 18:43
    this technique - good .
  • 18:43 - 18:46
    You can safely
    ignore my next sentence.
  • 18:46 - 18:48
    However if you're using that technique
  • 18:48 - 18:51
    I would strongly advise you to reconsider.
  • 18:51 - 18:53
    Because in the case of the fall
  • 18:53 - 18:55
    your hand might get sucked
  • 18:55 - 18:56
    into the bellying device
  • 18:56 - 18:58
    faster than you might think.
  • 18:58 - 19:00
    So as a good rule of thumb keep
  • 19:00 - 19:02
    your break hand always down.
  • 19:02 - 19:06
    And do any hand swapping or sliding there.
  • 19:06 - 19:08
    So now a little disclaimer.
  • 19:08 - 19:09
    I'm gonna show you
  • 19:09 - 19:12
    three different techniques
    of taking slack.
  • 19:12 - 19:14
    And depending on
    where you are on the planet
  • 19:14 - 19:15
    some of them
  • 19:15 - 19:18
    might be not considered as acceptable.
  • 19:18 - 19:19
    So stick with me
  • 19:19 - 19:21
    I'm gonna explain.
  • 19:21 - 19:23
    Because i went really deep
    in this rabbit hole.
  • 19:23 - 19:25
    So all the techniques start the same.
  • 19:25 - 19:27
    Your left hand reaches up
  • 19:27 - 19:29
    and pulls down on the rope.
  • 19:29 - 19:31
    While at the same time your break hand
  • 19:31 - 19:33
    pushes forward and locks it down.
  • 19:33 - 19:35
    And now at this point you need to bring
  • 19:35 - 19:38
    your right hand up the rope.
  • 19:38 - 19:41
    And there are
    three different ways to do so.
  • 19:41 - 19:42
    The first one.
  • 19:42 - 19:43
    It's more popular in Europe.
  • 19:43 - 19:46
    And it's called hand over hand
  • 19:46 - 19:47
    or V to the knee.
  • 19:47 - 19:50
    So you simply take your left hand
  • 19:50 - 19:53
    and go over your right hand
  • 19:53 - 19:54
    and then right hand goes
  • 19:54 - 19:55
    over your left hand.
  • 19:55 - 19:58
    That's why it's called hand over hand.
  • 19:58 - 20:00
    So you take, .... hand over hand,
  • 20:00 - 20:03
    you take, ... hand over hand.
  • 20:03 - 20:06
    So I find myself using this technique
  • 20:06 - 20:08
    when the climber wants me
    to take really hard
  • 20:08 - 20:10
    as he's moving up the rope.
  • 20:10 - 20:12
    Because you're always
  • 20:12 - 20:14
    pulling down on the rope.
  • 20:14 - 20:15
    You can...
  • 20:15 - 20:17
    It kind of feels like
  • 20:17 - 20:19
    climbing up the rope.
  • 20:19 - 20:22
    Very comfortable.
  • 20:23 - 20:24
    So the problem with this technique is
  • 20:24 - 20:26
    that when people get really good
  • 20:26 - 20:29
    and can do it really fast
  • 20:29 - 20:32
    they start letting go the brake hand
  • 20:32 - 20:36
    before the left hand goes
    into the locking position.
  • 20:36 - 20:37
    So we do this.
  • 20:37 - 20:40
    We take this, let go already,
  • 20:40 - 20:43
    and then go into locking position.
  • 20:43 - 20:45
    If the climber would fall
  • 20:45 - 20:47
    in the moment where you let go this
  • 20:47 - 20:50
    and you don't lock the hand down
  • 20:50 - 20:52
    you probably know what would happen.
  • 20:52 - 20:54
    So obviously a simple solution -
  • 20:54 - 20:55
    lock,
  • 20:55 - 20:57
    and then in the locking position
  • 20:57 - 20:58
    do any hand swapping.
  • 20:58 - 21:00
    And another thing you need to be aware of
  • 21:00 - 21:02
    that sometimes if the
  • 21:02 - 21:04
    climber drops a bunch of slack
  • 21:04 - 21:06
    your belaying device falls down.
  • 21:06 - 21:08
    And here you need to be careful
  • 21:08 - 21:09
    to not take your left
  • 21:09 - 21:12
    hand over the belaying device.
  • 21:12 - 21:14
    Otherwise if you do so
  • 21:14 - 21:15
    and the climber falls
  • 21:15 - 21:19
    your hand gets into this awkward position.
  • 21:19 - 21:21
    So instead you reach
    under your belaying device
  • 21:21 - 21:23
    and you grab the rope.
  • 21:23 - 21:25
    And now if the climber would fall
  • 21:25 - 21:27
    everything would be fine.
  • 21:27 - 21:29
    All right. Next technique is called PBUS.
  • 21:29 - 21:31
    Which is more commonly used in America.
  • 21:31 - 21:33
    Which means Pull, Break...
  • 21:33 - 21:36
    So basically the same stuff, as before.
  • 21:36 - 21:40
    But now instead of taking over the hand
  • 21:40 - 21:43
    you take Under and Slide.
  • 21:43 - 21:46
    So Pull, Brake, Under, Slide.
  • 21:46 - 21:49
    Pull Brake Under Slide.
  • 21:49 - 21:51
    So the benefit of this technique
  • 21:51 - 21:54
    is your strong hand never leaves the rope.
  • 21:54 - 21:56
    A little drawback of this technique
  • 21:56 - 21:58
    is when you have weight on the rope,
  • 21:58 - 22:00
    and you're trying to take hard,
  • 22:00 - 22:03
    now sliding up this hand
  • 22:03 - 22:06
    is not as comfortable as
  • 22:06 - 22:10
    in hand over hand technique.
  • 22:10 - 22:11
    So at some point
  • 22:11 - 22:14
    as you will be practicing
    your p-bus technique
  • 22:14 - 22:16
    you will realize
  • 22:16 - 22:17
    that you don't actually need
  • 22:17 - 22:20
    to bring your left hand down there
  • 22:20 - 22:22
    in order to bring your break hand up.
  • 22:22 - 22:25
    You can simply slide it up.
  • 22:25 - 22:27
    And this is a third technique
  • 22:27 - 22:29
    which is called a tunnel technique.
  • 22:29 - 22:30
    And since your left hand
  • 22:30 - 22:32
    never leaves this rope
  • 22:32 - 22:34
    it's the most efficient technique.
  • 22:34 - 22:36
    Because you can always switch between
  • 22:36 - 22:40
    taking slack and giving slack instantly.
  • 22:40 - 22:41
    So no matter in which
  • 22:41 - 22:43
    moment of taking slack I am
  • 22:43 - 22:45
    I can always give slack.
  • 22:45 - 22:48
    And contrary any other technique where
  • 22:48 - 22:50
    my left hand leaves
  • 22:50 - 22:51
    now it needs to go back
  • 22:51 - 22:53
    in order for me to give slack
  • 22:53 - 22:55
    so it's an extra action.
  • 22:55 - 22:57
    Also tunnel technique is the best for
  • 22:57 - 23:00
    taking small amounts of slack.
  • 23:00 - 23:03
    If I would try to take
    a small amount of slack
  • 23:03 - 23:05
    continuously with any other technique
  • 23:05 - 23:10
    it's a lot of hand movements.
  • 23:10 - 23:13
    While the tunnel technique
    it's very relaxed.
  • 23:13 - 23:16
    And that's why it's the
    most efficient technique.
  • 23:16 - 23:18
    However you might know
  • 23:18 - 23:19
    or maybe you don't
  • 23:19 - 23:22
    this technique is actually not considered
  • 23:22 - 23:25
    acceptable in some parts of the planet.
  • 23:25 - 23:28
    With the argument that during the moment
  • 23:28 - 23:30
    where you slide the hand up
  • 23:30 - 23:33
    you don't have a firm grip
    on the brake hand.
  • 23:33 - 23:35
    And during the fall maybe you will
  • 23:35 - 23:37
    not be able to catch the fall.
  • 23:37 - 23:40
    To which here is my arguments.
  • 23:40 - 23:41
    First of all if you use
  • 23:41 - 23:44
    any assisted belaying device
  • 23:44 - 23:46
    you don't even need any
  • 23:46 - 23:48
    hard grip on the brake side of the rope.
  • 23:48 - 23:52
    Any light tug will make the device lock.
  • 23:52 - 23:55
    So this is not an issue immediately.
  • 23:55 - 23:56
    Now if you are using a tube
  • 23:56 - 23:58
    I actually went out
  • 23:58 - 23:59
    and did an experiment on this.
  • 23:59 - 24:01
    Where I asked inexperienced belayers
  • 24:01 - 24:04
    to keep moving the hand up and down
  • 24:04 - 24:06
    while I was distracting them
  • 24:06 - 24:07
    and the climber was
  • 24:07 - 24:10
    taking unexpected falls for them.
  • 24:10 - 24:12
    So stay tuned for that
  • 24:12 - 24:13
    it's gonna be really crazy
  • 24:13 - 24:15
    and really interesting episode.
  • 24:15 - 24:17
    But in general when sliding the hand up
  • 24:17 - 24:19
    don't make a big tunnel.
  • 24:19 - 24:20
    I don't like that this technique
  • 24:20 - 24:22
    is actually called a tunnel method.
  • 24:22 - 24:24
    It shouldn't be a tunnel.
  • 24:24 - 24:27
    You're barely opening the hand just
  • 24:27 - 24:29
    barely enough for it to slide up the rope.
  • 24:29 - 24:31
    And if you are a beginner
  • 24:31 - 24:32
    it's really good idea
  • 24:32 - 24:34
    to start practicing with PBUS technique.
  • 24:34 - 24:39
    Because you will be sliding
    your hand up the rope a lot
  • 24:39 - 24:42
    with the backup of your other hand.
  • 24:42 - 24:44
    And you will learn the feeling of the
  • 24:44 - 24:46
    rope going through your hand.
  • 24:46 - 24:48
    So start with this
  • 24:48 - 24:49
    and once you get
  • 24:49 - 24:51
    really comfortable with this
  • 24:51 - 24:54
    not bringing the left hand down and just
  • 24:54 - 24:56
    doing this will feel very natural.
  • 24:56 - 24:58
    By that point.
  • 24:58 - 24:59
    And just to make sure
  • 24:59 - 25:01
    that I'm not missing something
  • 25:01 - 25:03
    in regards of safety
    of these three techniques
  • 25:03 - 25:05
    I wrote an email to about
  • 25:05 - 25:08
    25 different climbing safety related
  • 25:08 - 25:10
    organizations and associations.
  • 25:10 - 25:13
    And asked them
    to comment on these techniques.
  • 25:13 - 25:15
    Not all of them replied, unfortunately.
  • 25:15 - 25:17
    However out of those who replied
  • 25:17 - 25:20
    none of them said anything against of
  • 25:20 - 25:22
    any particular technique.
  • 25:22 - 25:23
    So as long as you follow the
  • 25:23 - 25:26
    basic guidelines of proper belaying
  • 25:26 - 25:27
    you will be fine.
  • 25:27 - 25:28
    Maybe with an exception
  • 25:28 - 25:29
    if you're in the US and you need
  • 25:29 - 25:31
    to take a delaying exam.
  • 25:31 - 25:34
    Then you might be forced to use the PBUS.
  • 25:34 - 25:36
    And few more mistakes that people do
  • 25:36 - 25:38
    when they're taking slack.
  • 25:38 - 25:40
    First of all they take the slack like this
  • 25:40 - 25:44
    or like this...
  • 25:44 - 25:46
    So unless you are using
  • 25:46 - 25:47
    a assisted belaying device
  • 25:47 - 25:48
    and you're guaranteed
  • 25:48 - 25:51
    that that device will lock at this angle
  • 25:51 - 25:54
    which I will make a separate video on that
  • 25:54 - 25:56
    you might be in trouble.
  • 25:56 - 25:59
    Second mistake is people hold
  • 25:59 - 26:02
    both strands of the rope
    with the left hand.
  • 26:02 - 26:04
    They do something like this.
  • 26:04 - 26:06
    The reason why they do this
  • 26:06 - 26:09
    is to prevent the belaying device
  • 26:09 - 26:10
    from falling down there.
  • 26:10 - 26:12
    However to fix that you don't need
  • 26:12 - 26:14
    to hold both strands of the rope.
  • 26:14 - 26:15
    You can just simply
  • 26:15 - 26:16
    hold one strand of the rope.
  • 26:16 - 26:18
    And you will have
  • 26:18 - 26:21
    exactly the same result.
  • 26:21 - 26:23
    OK that's a lot of talking
    about taking slack.
  • 26:23 - 26:26
    I just felt that that's
    the most important part.
  • 26:26 - 26:28
    And the rest will be much more simple.
  • 26:28 - 26:32
    So to give slack you simply
    reverse the tunneling technique.
  • 26:32 - 26:36
    Where your left hand pulls up
    while your right hand assists.
  • 26:36 - 26:38
    Then the left hand goes down.
  • 26:38 - 26:40
    And you slide the break hand down.
  • 26:40 - 26:43
    And you repeat.
  • 26:44 - 26:46
    And the same technique works with most
  • 26:46 - 26:48
    of assisted belaying devices.
  • 26:48 - 26:50
    While with some of assisted devices
  • 26:50 - 26:52
    you will need a special action.
  • 26:52 - 26:54
    With assisted tubers it's common
  • 26:54 - 26:55
    to push them up
  • 26:55 - 26:58
    while you're giving slack.
  • 26:58 - 27:01
    Now in case of the GriGri you can either
  • 27:01 - 27:04
    use that standard way of giving slack.
  • 27:04 - 27:06
    Or you can press on GriGri's cam
  • 27:06 - 27:08
    and pull the rope.
  • 27:08 - 27:10
    Just don't forget the rule number two.
  • 27:10 - 27:13
    The rope stays in the hand all the time.
  • 27:13 - 27:16
    Now in case you need to give
    a lot of slack quickly.
  • 27:16 - 27:19
    Like if the climber is about to clip.
  • 27:19 - 27:20
    You take your left hand
  • 27:20 - 27:22
    close to belaying device
  • 27:22 - 27:24
    and your break hand
    far from belaying device.
  • 27:24 - 27:27
    This is important. Only then you can give
  • 27:27 - 27:29
    a lot of slack quickly.
  • 27:29 - 27:32
    If your left hand is somewhere up
  • 27:32 - 27:33
    you will be limited by it
  • 27:33 - 27:37
    how far up you can raise this hand.
  • 27:37 - 27:40
    Equally if your break hand is close
  • 27:40 - 27:42
    you will be limited by that hand
  • 27:42 - 27:43
    how fast you can give slack
  • 27:43 - 27:45
    and then you will need to
  • 27:45 - 27:46
    do more actions.
  • 27:46 - 27:48
    So left hand close,
  • 27:48 - 27:50
    right hand far. Anticipate.
  • 27:50 - 27:52
    And you can give a lot of slack quickly.
  • 27:52 - 27:53
    And if things go wrong
  • 27:53 - 27:56
    you can take all of
    that slack quickly back.
  • 27:56 - 27:57
    Now when you need to lower the climber
  • 27:57 - 27:59
    you take both of the hands
  • 27:59 - 28:00
    on the brake side of the rope.
  • 28:00 - 28:02
    And you use one hand
  • 28:02 - 28:05
    to feed the rope to the other hand.
  • 28:05 - 28:08
    That's one way or if you're comfortable
  • 28:08 - 28:12
    you can let the rope slide
    through both of your hands.
  • 28:12 - 28:15
    The risk here is however
    if you go too fast
  • 28:15 - 28:18
    the rope will go so fast
  • 28:18 - 28:19
    through both of your hands
  • 28:19 - 28:21
    that it can burn both of them.
  • 28:21 - 28:23
    And then you will probably
    drop your climber.
  • 28:23 - 28:25
    So simply don't go fast.
  • 28:25 - 28:28
    There is absolutely no point
    of lowering a climber fast.
  • 28:28 - 28:30
    There is nothing cool about that.
  • 28:30 - 28:32
    It heats your equipment way more,
  • 28:32 - 28:34
    wears down your equipment, it's expensive.
  • 28:34 - 28:36
    And go in a controlled manner.
  • 28:36 - 28:39
    And if you're not sure you can always
  • 28:39 - 28:40
    feed the rope like so.
  • 28:40 - 28:44
    And in case your climber takes a fall
  • 28:44 - 28:47
    just hold on the brake side of the rope
  • 28:47 - 28:49
    even if you have number two in your pants.
  • 28:49 - 28:51
    Hold it. Never let go.
  • 28:51 - 28:55
    And as soon as your climber
    will regain the ground
  • 28:55 - 28:58
    and unload the rope
    most of the belaying devices
  • 28:58 - 28:59
    will unlock themselves.
  • 28:59 - 29:02
    And you're ready to continue belaying.
  • 29:02 - 29:05
    While with some devices like Click Up
  • 29:05 - 29:08
    once it locks you need a special action
  • 29:08 - 29:10
    to unlock it to continue belaying.
  • 29:10 - 29:11
    So as i already said
  • 29:11 - 29:13
    it's a good idea to look into the manual
  • 29:13 - 29:14
    of your belaying device
  • 29:14 - 29:18
    to know all these little nuances
    that there might be.
  • 29:18 - 29:20
    Now if you are teaching beginners
  • 29:20 - 29:22
    or you are a beginner yourself
  • 29:22 - 29:24
    practice using belaying device
  • 29:24 - 29:27
    on the ground, without a climber.
  • 29:27 - 29:29
    And only once you're
    completely comfortable
  • 29:29 - 29:32
    and you're ready to go
    and actually belay somebody
  • 29:32 - 29:34
    then make sure to have somebody
  • 29:34 - 29:36
    experienced backing up,
  • 29:36 - 29:38
    holding on the break side of the rope,
  • 29:38 - 29:42
    and giving you guidance,
    assistance on your technique.
  • 29:42 - 29:44
    This is really important.
  • 29:44 - 29:46
    I actually once saved a climber
  • 29:46 - 29:49
    when inexperienced belayer
    was using a GriGri
  • 29:49 - 29:52
    I was backing up the rope.
  • 29:52 - 29:54
    And actually I was the one
    who caught the fall.
  • 29:54 - 29:56
    And the full story
  • 29:56 - 29:57
    if you're interested is
  • 29:57 - 29:59
    in this video about GriGri.
  • 29:59 - 30:00
    And of course don't take this video
  • 30:00 - 30:02
    as a complete guide into belaying.
  • 30:02 - 30:04
    There is way more things you need to know.
  • 30:04 - 30:06
    From proper slack management
  • 30:06 - 30:10
    to soft catches, to belayer movement,
  • 30:10 - 30:12
    to good communication with your climber.
  • 30:12 - 30:18
    And all of that is coming in the
    future episodes of belay master class.
  • 30:18 - 30:21
    That's a lot of effort to make
    these videos to be honest.
  • 30:21 - 30:22
    And this video was
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    brought to you by Mammut
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    and by all the people
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    who are supporting me
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    So huge thank you for everyone.
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    And see you in the next episode.
Title:
Complete Guide into Belay Devices - Differences and Efficient Usage | Ep.6
Description:

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Video Language:
English
Team:
Hard Is Easy
Project:
Belay Masterclass
Duration:
30:35

English subtitles

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