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    Greetings, trouble-makers.
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    Welcome to Trouble….
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    my name is not important.
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    In the year of 1990 my community,
    the Mohawks of Kanehsatà:ke,
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    began to fight the construction of a golf course
    that would have destroyed
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    one of our sacred burial grounds.
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    We filed petitions, we protested, and finally
    we took up arms against the Quebec police
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    and eventually the Canadian army,
    to protect our land.
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    After a 78 day stand off... we fuckin won!
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    And the cemetery and the surrounding pines,
    that would have been cleared and used by rich
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    men to play golf on, are still there today.
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    Fast forward to 26 years later.
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    The Lakota community of Standing Rock,
    faced off with oil infrastructure company,
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    Energy Transfer Partners against their attempt
    to build the Dakota Access Pipeline, or DAPL,
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    through their territory,
    and under the Missouri River.
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    A pipeline that they say, if built, will almost
    certainly rupture and contaminate
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    the water of millions of people
    in the United States.
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    The fight against DAPL became the
    stuff of legend.
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    Thousands of Indigenous and Settler allies
    converged in North Dakota to stop this project
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    against incredible odds.
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    They became known as water protectors, and
    in November of 2016 they had a temporary
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    victory, when outgoing president Barack Obama
    denied a permit for a key part of the construction.
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    For some, this executive action seemed
    to validate a particular strategy
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    and corresponding set of tactics.
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    But history has clearly shown that states
    have never had any qualms breaking the countless
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    promises they’ve made to Indigenous peoples.
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    As for those who’d forgotten,
    or neglected this fact...
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    Donald Trump wasted no time in reminding them.
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    At the same time,
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    there were many water protectors
    who saw this political maneuver
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    as the dirty trick it was,
    and who continued to stress
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    the need for a strategy based on
    physical confrontation and direct action.
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    During the next thirty minutes, we’ll bring
    you the voices of some of these individuals,
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    as they relate their experiences fighting
    the black snake...
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    and making a whole lotta trouble.
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    It's hard to just even use the English word
    "warrior" when you're talking about
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    what it means to be a warrior.
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    Because as Indigenous people, we we born into
    this life and we believe that it's our duty
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    and responsibility to defend our land,
    in which our language, our culture,
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    our existence flows from.
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    There is no separating us from our land.
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    It's a spiritual connection that goes deep
    since the beginning of our people.
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    So as a warrior we are a defender.
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    We are a protector.
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    And as a warrior we would do and by any means
    protect and defend our people.
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    Anything that comes in the way of that
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    -- and here we're talking about the contamination
    of water that so much people depend on.
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    I've been down here since the middle of September.
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    And here to be in solidarity with people
    that are fighting the Dakota Access Pipeline.
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    Across the river is Sacred Stone camp
    where it originally started.
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    There was like a handful of people there
    for a long time.
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    Once these guys actually came here and really
    started building and destroying the earth,
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    so everyone just started coming here faster.
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    And every day it was just growing and growing.
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    Before you knew it, Sacred Stone camp
    was just overflowing.
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    I came out here in response to a call
    for medical support.
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    We received an invite from some of the matriarchs
    and Indigenous leadership from this Lakota/
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    Dakota/Nakota territory to come and help fight
    the black snake, help fight the pipeline.
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    And in some matriarchs' opinions, "by any
    means necessary".
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    And in a spirit of collective resistance,
    and use a diversity of tactics to do that.
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    There's hundreds of camps in this bigger
    Standing Rock encampment that's called
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    Oceti Sakowin camp.
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    It got up to around twenty thousand people.
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    But a lot of the people that are here and
    have maintained camps here.
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    There's High Star camp, there is Wild Oglala
    camp.
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    So this is a big massive mobilization.
    There’s a lot of people here
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    and they want to stop a pipeline.
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    It went from just a few of us in little small
    groups, going out and shutting down the pipeline
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    wherever we could, y'know?
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    Like multiple sites a day... everything.
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    We were just on it.
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    Black Snake Killaz! Black Snake Killaz!
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    Alright, now from here.
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    On three, we're gonna move.
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    One, two, three!
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    Move! Move! Move!
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    Diversity of tactics is a turn of phrase that
    represents the very real fact that for every
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    one person on the frontline who's there and
    who can stand and catch rubber bullets,
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    there are many folks behind them.
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    Be those folks medics, be those folks logistics
    personnel, be those the folks in the kitchen
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    who fed them that day.
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    I believe that the only way that anyone could
    organize is as a diversity of tactics
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    because we are all so diverse people.
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    Where else could you get thousands of people
    to all come together like that and form this
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    community and actually people are not,
    y'know... like killing each other?
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    Look at the rest of society!
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    We need all the things.
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    We need people litigating in court, we need
    people doing "petitions", we need people praying,
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    and also people that are doing direct action.
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    A lot of people did a lot of different things.
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    They went to courthouse, went to the State
    Capitol, locking down on the machinery and
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    actually physically stopping the construction
    and the machines for the day.
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    They had massive caravans out to just make
    a presence and stop the construction.
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    Stopping it everywhere we could...
    anyway we could.
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    Using our bodies, locking down, just showing
    up in force and scaring the workers off.
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    Just the pure presence of four hundred
    water protectors and Native people
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    would shut DAPL down for the day.
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    And sometimes they would actually be running
    to their trucks.
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    Because they know what they're doing is wrong.
    Like... I would be scared too!
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    At one point, lockdowns were really effective.
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    They could stop construction, they could stop
    what was happening for the day on
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    prospective work sites.
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    But then it got to the point where it was
    so militarized.
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    And with the resources that we were up against,
    it didn't matter that we had the intention
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    to go and lock down to something.
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    It just wasn't an option.
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    So then people had to reevaluate the situation
    and ask themselves what it means to be effective,
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    look at the violence that is being perpetrated
    on them, and then collectively come back together
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    and decide what tactics they're going to use.
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    And then people started seeing things like
    flaming cars on highways, and what-have-you.
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    Because a lot of the time, that sacred fire
    was the only thing protecting people from
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    the crazy cops and military from coming in
    and wrecking shop.
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    The climax of everything that
    I witnessed when I was here,
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    was when the police took
    the front line camp.
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    People sacrificed vehicles that day, to blockade.
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    "What does that mean, to sacrifice vehicles?"
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    Lit up.
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    Were it not for people who had been training
    for these sorts of non-violent civil disobedience
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    confrontational situations...
    that pipe would've been built by now.
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    Success in stopping a pipeline or
    other major infrastructure project
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    depends on a number of factors.
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    And despite what lots of people wanna believe...
    facebook likes aren't one of them.
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    A strong heart, patience, and determination
    on the part of land defenders are all crucial.
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    But timing and proper planning are also key.
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    It's important to get out in front of the
    pipeline, both physically and by knowing
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    when and where to make your stand.
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    On the west coast of Turtle Island, in the
    unceded territories of the Wet'suwet'en nation
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    in so-called "British Columbia", warriors
    and tribal elders from the Unis'tot'en clan
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    have been blocking the construction of
    multiple pipelines through their territories
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    for seven years now.
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    This anchor of land defense has been the Unis'tot'en
    Camp, a resistance community constructed
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    smack dab in the pipelines' proposed path
    -- similar in some ways to Oceti Sakowin,
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    also known as Sacred Stone camp,
    that has served as the home base
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    for water protectors fighting
    to block the Dakota Access Pipeline.
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    Here’s camp spokesperson Freda Huson,
    kicking the cops out of her territory.
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    People don’t just freely walk in
    because were blocking pipelines out,
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    we’re not blocking everybody out.
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    I’m not a pipeline.
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    And here she is again kicking out
    pipeline workers who illegally
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    choppered in to do survey work.
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    Is there a problem why you’re not leaving?
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    And here she is denying access to
    Chevron executives, who had the audacity to
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    offer her corporate bottled water
    and industrial tobacco.
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    We’re here today to talk to you about doing
    work on your land and are requesting access
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    onto your territory.
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    We’ve already said no to these projects
    and that no pipelines would come on our territory.
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    In November of 2016, Canada's walking photo-op
    of a Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau,
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    signed an order killing
    the Northern Gateway pipeline,
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    one of the pipelines that had been slated
    to cross paths with the Unis'tot'en.
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    But at the same news conference where he
    signed Northern Gateway's death certificate,
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    Trudeau announced the approval of two other pipelines
    including Enbridge's Line 3
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    and Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain
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    -- which is expected to face serious resistance
    in the months and years to come.
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    In addition to logistical considerations,
    those seeking to block pipelines need to be
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    prepared to deal with internal dynamics, and
    for the potential for disagreements over tactics
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    to sow further discord and disunity.
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    Here you have hundreds of different people
    and hundreds of different tribes
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    that are coming together.
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    People that have many different views
    on how we're gonna fight this pipeline.
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    People believe that the only way we're going
    to fight this pipeline is if we face off
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    and when we fight direct head-on.
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    Some people think the best way is the legal
    route.
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    Some people feel that prayer is
    the most powerful thing
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    and that's the only way that we're
    going to beat this.
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    But as Indigenous people, we have to understand
    that we come from respect.
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    Y'know... that's who we are
    as Indigenous people.
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    Respecting the way that people believe.
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    There has been a group ever since we got here,
    y'know, that wanted some of us out of here.
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    But we're still here.
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    We didn't want to go and we weren't
    gonna go nowhere cause we knew
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    nothing was gonna happen if we left.
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    There was a lot of fighting that went on too
    because they didn't want our camp
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    doing actions no more.
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    They didn't understand direct action so they
    just didn't want it, you know?
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    The whole tribe and all the council and everybody.
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    There has been a lot of issues with
    "peace police" and how people
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    have been fighting this struggle.
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    Even when it's been just lockdowns.
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    The peace police both here in treaty territory,
    much as I've seen them over the years
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    in urban settings and demonstrations,
    are folks who tend to, for one reason or another,
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    feel that their concern for other people's safety
    trumps any good tactics, or any of those
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    individuals who may be putting themselves
    knowingly in harm's way.
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    Trumps their opinions that they have made
    to choose to be in harm's way.
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    Who are the Peace Police?
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    It's a combination of people that are
    closely affiliated with the tribe,
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    people that have, like, monetary interest
    in different NGOs.
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    So even some people that came here that
    threw down in Ferguson and Baltimore,
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    that were part of those struggles, have come
    here and have felt relatively immobilized.
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    Because they've tried to be good comrades
    in deferring to Indigenous leadership.
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    But there's such a struggle between different
    groups as to, like, who is Indigenous leadership
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    and what it means to be here in a good way.
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    And what it means to resist in a way that's
    beneficial to the local community.
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    There was this group of people that came in
    and they were just all about "peace! peace!"
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    And they were bringing around spiritual items
    and trying to use them against the people
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    and it caused a lot of confusion and fear
    and, I don't know, anger.
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    Don't touch me!
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    Back up!
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    Back up!
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    Some of our own people that were policing
    our own people, telling our own warriors
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    and water protectors that were
    taking direct action to go back.
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    Go back to camp.
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    "Keep it peaceful!"
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    "Come on you guys...that's not okay"
    "We need to be peaceful!"
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    You can't both ask people to come and fight
    and use civil disobedience and nonviolent
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    direct action tactics and similarly lose
    your spine for those tactics when people
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    start getting injured or the police start
    responding with the sorts of violence
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    that we train folks to expect.
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    When we instead tell folks that this will
    be accomplished through the courts,
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    or this will be accomplished
    through prayer...
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    why were so many people asked to come
    to be physically present?
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    These peace police have time and time again
    scuddled and interfered with actions that
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    were well under the momentum to be successful.
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    And they were hampered.
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    “love will find a way!”
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    If there's one good thing you can say about
    nazis, it's you know that they are your enemy.
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    No doubt about it.
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    You see one of those racist idiots walking
    down the street, or giving an interview with
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    a reporter, you just wanna punch 'em
    in the head.
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    Ouch!
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    But within movements of liberation,
    there are actors within our ranks
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    that claim to be our allies,
    but who are really not.
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    Putting aside police infiltrators and informants,
    who pose a real threat,
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    we'd like to talk to you about
    Non-Governmental Organizations, or NGO's.
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    NGO's have a sordid history of infiltrating,
    pacifying and co-opting movements.
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    Now... not all NGO's engage in these practices,
    and some actually do good work,
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    but in recent memory we've seen far too many
    examples of Environmental NGO's
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    royally screwing over Indigenous folks
    engaged in land defense.
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    Take the battle for the Great Bear Rainforest
    in Western Canada, where Greenpeace and ForestEthics
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    joined the Indigenous grassroots forest protectors,
    later to sideline them and negotiate with
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    logging companies to save a fraction of the
    one of the most important temperate rainforests
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    left in the world.
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    What the logging companies got in return,
    was a promise that the Environmental NGO's
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    would not protest or oppose logging
    in Western Canada.
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    This deal became a template for
    an even bigger betrayal.
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    At stake this time was the
    Canadian Boreal Forest,
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    one of the largest continuous forests
    in the world.
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    This time Greenpeace and ForestEthics teamed
    up with the Canadian Forests Products Association,
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    i.e. the logging industry, for a similar deal.
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    Once again, Indigenous communities who have
    land in the Boreal Forest were not consulted
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    and NGO's promised not only to stop
    anti-logging campaigns in the Boreal Forest,
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    but also to defend the industry.
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    One interesting piece of the
    agreement is, uhhh....
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    with Greenpeace, David Suzuki, ForestEthics,
    Canadian Parks and Wilderness on our side,
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    when someone else comes
    and tries to bully us,
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    the agreement actually requires that they
    come and work with us in repelling the attack.
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    And we’ll be able to say...
    fight me, fight my gang.
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    The latest deal of this type was signed
    between NGO's like ForestEthics,
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    and Alberta's Tar Sands industry.
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    Given the public backlash of the previous
    two agreements, this one was done
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    behind closed doors,
    so we don't know all the details.
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    What we do know is that oil companies agreed
    to place limits in Tar Sands extraction,
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    in exchange for the enviros backing down on
    their opposition to pipeline construction.
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    We now turn our attention to another movement
    enemy hidden in plain sight.
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    That is the federally-funded tribal governments
    that rule over and police Indigenous communities.
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    In the US, these so called "sovereign tribes"
    govern federal government-assigned pieces
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    of land called reservations,
    or reserves in the case of Canada.
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    Their leaders are members of the community,
    and are chosen through elections,
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    and have little or nothing to do with
    traditional governing structures
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    of the Indigenous communities
    they oversee.
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    Historically, although there are some exceptions,
    tribal government officials are more likely
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    to cut deals with mining, logging and other
    extractive industries to exploit traditional
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    territories of the Indigenous nations they
    belong to.
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    This is land outside the reservation and land
    in which they have no jurisdiction.
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    Both in the US and Canada, Tribal Councils
    have their own police forces.
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    Let's not forget that Indian Police killed
    Chief Sitting Bull at the Standing Rock Reservation.
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    And in my community of Kanehsatà:ke,
    Mohawk police shot and severely crippled
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    Oka Crisis veteran Joe David.
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    He later passed away from those injuries.
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    Today we see the same thing happening
    in Standing Rock.
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    Just this month Bureau of Indian Affairs cops
    brutally beat a water protector
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    fighting to stop DAPL,
    in their campaign to clear out
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    the last remaining people
    out of the protest camps.
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    I believe, and it is my belief, that any type
    of DIA, or Department of Indian Affairs,
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    or Bureau of Indian Affairs, you know Tribal
    Government or elected Chief and Council
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    that receives federal funding from
    the federal government that pays their bills,
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    that gives them the paycheck,
    has [no] right within a people's movement.
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    Because we've seen it time and time again,
    them be co-opted.
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    And it's not the true voice of the people.
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    And we're dealing with this back home with
    our fight against the Kinder Morgan pipeline
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    and I see us as Indigenous people battling
    with this straight across the whole hemisphere,
  • 18:32 - 18:38
    where there are Native people that side
    with the corporate interests.
  • 18:38 - 18:42
    And it really does damage to our people
    and to our movements.
  • 18:42 - 18:50
    And a lot of times our people fear exposing
    the corruption within tribal government,
  • 18:50 - 18:54
    or even take this tribal government
    as their own government
  • 18:54 - 18:59
    -- when that was invented by
    the American and Canadian state
  • 18:59 - 19:01
    to continue to control the people.
  • 19:02 - 19:06
    As discussions about the Dakota Access Pipeline
    continue, Standing Rock tribal council
  • 19:06 - 19:10
    will take all the support they can get,
    provided they abide by
  • 19:10 - 19:11
    the rules of peaceful protest.
  • 19:12 - 19:17
    Folks who overly fetishize Native peoples
    and populations on Turtle Island but don't
  • 19:17 - 19:22
    have a real understanding of the reservation
    system, or that these reservations used to
  • 19:22 - 19:28
    be prisoner of war camps, they think that
    Tribal Council is part and parcel with the
  • 19:28 - 19:33
    traditional leadership, which is only played
    into when you see tribal council members wearing
  • 19:33 - 19:38
    full war bonnets when they've not done
    anything that the traditional mandate
  • 19:38 - 19:42
    to get such a sacred item would dictate.
  • 19:42 - 19:50
    And so you have this real kind of constant
    simmering conflict between these more traditional
  • 19:50 - 19:56
    Native folks and these IRA governments who
    you even see in much of the mainstream media
  • 19:56 - 20:02
    who talk about Chairman Dave Archambault,
    and don't talk about the International Youth Council
  • 20:02 - 20:04
    or the Youth Runners, or
    Ladonna Bravebull-Allard,
  • 20:04 - 20:08
    who it was their spark that started
    the first sacred fire over at Sacred Stone.
  • 20:08 - 20:12
    There has been a lot of self-proclaimed Elders
    that are men that are not all from this community,
  • 20:12 - 20:17
    or are not deferring to the matriarchs in
    this community that are supposed to have power.
  • 20:17 - 20:20
    And that has created conflict and divide
    when we don't need it.
  • 20:20 - 20:23
    Which is exactly what the gov wants and what
    COINTELPRO and shit like that does.
  • 20:23 - 20:32
    As a friend kinda put it as the question of
    the year around here.... is "which Elder?"
  • 20:32 - 20:37
    Because you always have these instances of
    people coming and saying they're speaking
  • 20:37 - 20:39
    on the authority of "the Elders."
  • 20:39 - 20:41
    Or "a Elder."
  • 20:41 - 20:44
    But often time they don't know the
    name of that Elder.
  • 20:44 - 20:48
    And so you can't help but wonder
    how good of a way they are operating in
  • 20:48 - 20:51
    if they're coming in and barking orders
    but they don't really know
  • 20:51 - 20:53
    where those orders originated from.
  • 20:53 - 20:57
    "The chiefs told us to go around asking people
    if we could-" "There is no chief here!
  • 20:57 - 20:59
    There are no chiefs!"
  • 20:59 - 21:02
    "No, nobody's listening right now!
  • 21:02 - 21:06
    The Elders asked you guys to go back to camp!"
  • 21:06 - 21:08
    "See... fuckin people are
    always doing that shit.
  • 21:08 - 21:10
    Trying to split everybody up."
  • 21:10 - 21:12
    You see it clearly.
  • 21:12 - 21:17
    The players that come in to be able to co-opt.
  • 21:17 - 21:21
    And we have to be able to pinpoint that
    and to be able to address it
  • 21:21 - 21:29
    in a way that's going to expose it,
    but also eliminate it from happening again.
  • 21:29 - 21:33
    "And what we need to do is
    we have to be proud of what we did.
  • 21:33 - 21:38
    We have to be honored by the victory
    and it's time now.
  • 21:38 - 21:41
    It's time to go home."
  • 21:41 - 21:47
    There is a lot of different ideas and lot
    of discussion around why Dave Archambault
  • 21:47 - 21:49
    asked people to go home.
  • 21:49 - 21:53
    One of the things is someone said
    that the tribe could be held liable
  • 21:53 - 21:54
    if he didn't publicly say this.
  • 21:54 - 21:59
    But this land is what they call
    "1851 Treaty Land."
  • 21:59 - 22:04
    This land that the government calls
    "Army Corps Lands" is out of the jurisdiction
  • 22:04 - 22:08
    of the Reservation so it's supposedly
    out of the jurisdiction of
  • 22:08 - 22:11
    Dave Archambault
    and the Tribal Chairman.
  • 22:11 - 22:15
    This one pipeline where people refuse to leave.
  • 22:15 - 22:19
    This is not gonna be detrimental to our Nation.
  • 22:19 - 22:20
    He's a politician.
  • 22:20 - 22:21
    That's what it is.
  • 22:21 - 22:24
    Like, is that who people defer to
    in the community here
  • 22:24 - 22:26
    as like the end-all be-all?
    No.
  • 22:26 - 22:30
    People defer to the matriarchs from the community,
    or their Elders from their tribes
  • 22:30 - 22:33
    that they're representing
    that have been, like, invited to be here.
  • 22:33 - 22:35
    Does that make people leave?
    Obviously not.
  • 22:35 - 22:40
    So obviously the people that are left here,
    think it's bullshit, or they would have left.
  • 22:42 - 22:46
    Despite all our best efforts...
    sometimes pipelines still get built.
  • 22:46 - 22:51
    The US alone contains over 2.5 million miles
    of oil and natural gas pipelines.
  • 22:51 - 22:53
    That's enough pipe to encircle the earth
    more than 100 times.
  • 22:53 - 22:56
    Thankfully, there are a number of ways
    to stop the flows of existing pipelines
  • 22:56 - 22:58
    for those who know what they're doing.
  • 22:58 - 23:02
    Last year, Enbridge's Line 9 pipeline was
    shut down three times by trouble-makers
  • 23:02 - 23:05
    who broke into Enbridge's stations
    and shut down manual valves.
  • 23:05 - 23:09
    This happened once in so-called Quebec,
    and twice in so-called Ontario.
  • 23:09 - 23:13
    Activists used a similar tactic to simultaneously
    shut down five Tar Sands pipelines
  • 23:13 - 23:16
    coming into the US,
    in a coordinated action
  • 23:16 - 23:19
    carried out in solidarity with
    water defenders in Standing Rock.
  • 23:19 - 23:23
    Since they cover huge tracts of land, pipelines
    are extremely vulnerable to sabotage.
  • 23:23 - 23:28
    Between 2008 and 2009, Encana pipelines
    in and around the towns of Dawson Creek
  • 23:28 - 23:33
    and Tomslake, in so-called BC,
    were targeted by a series of bombings.
  • 23:33 - 23:38
    Earlier this year, someone used heavy machinery
    to dig up a section of pipe in so-called Alberta,
  • 23:38 - 23:40
    causing about half a million dollars in damage.
  • 23:40 - 23:43
    Oil infrastructure has also been a choice
    target for armed rebel groups,
  • 23:43 - 23:47
    such as the ELN, and the Movement for
    the Emancipation of the Niger Delta,
  • 23:47 - 23:48
    or MEND, in Nigeria.
  • 23:48 - 23:53
    Of course, when taking action against existing
    pipeline infrastructure, it's incredibly important
  • 23:53 - 23:56
    that people know what they're doing, and are
    fully aware of all the risks involved.
  • 23:56 - 24:00
    States go to extreme lengths to criminalize
    people they catch messing with the flows of
  • 24:00 - 24:03
    crude and natural gas, and will try
    to deter activists with the threat of
  • 24:03 - 24:05
    extremely long prison sentences.
  • 24:05 - 24:09
    And it should be obvious, but it's worth stressing
    that the whole point of shutting oil pipelines
  • 24:09 - 24:10
    is to avoid environmental damage.
  • 24:10 - 24:14
    So it's vitally important that anyone carrying
    out these types of actions take all the necessary
  • 24:14 - 24:19
    precautions to ensure that they don't accidentally
    end up causing a leak or spills themselves.
  • 24:19 - 24:21
    That said...we're in for a long fight
    with high stakes.
  • 24:21 - 24:26
    What looks like a defeat can also be a chance
    to regroup, reflect on how things went down,
  • 24:26 - 24:30
    and figure out how to adapt our strategies
    and tactics as necessary.
  • 24:32 - 24:39
    What I learned from here is that, going home
    and working with our community and Nation,
  • 24:39 - 24:45
    we really have to set out some type of template
    or way to organize that's going to respect
  • 24:45 - 24:48
    the whole range of diversity of tactics.
  • 24:48 - 24:51
    And I believe that it's
    going to take education
  • 24:51 - 24:55
    and y'know... it's going to
    have to take leading by example,
  • 24:55 - 24:59
    because we can't have
    history repeat itself.
  • 24:59 - 25:02
    There is just regrouping that needs to happen.
  • 25:02 - 25:07
    Recollectivizing. And the biggest part, that
    comes back to what we've been talking about
  • 25:07 - 25:10
    is trying to get either
    the peace police out of here
  • 25:10 - 25:15
    or have them be accountable for their actions,
    so that they can see that what they're doing
  • 25:15 - 25:18
    is really negative to the struggle as a whole.
  • 25:18 - 25:22
    And it's negative to community building,
    and that they are not protecting the community.
  • 25:22 - 25:23
    They're endangering the community.
  • 25:23 - 25:27
    They think they're protecting the community
    from the cops and the military "coming in."
  • 25:27 - 25:30
    But the fact is, they're already here.
  • 25:30 - 25:31
    They're gonna build this thing.
  • 25:31 - 25:35
    It'll eventually break, rupture,
    what have-you, and then it will hurt
  • 25:35 - 25:37
    and destroy the community more.
  • 25:37 - 25:41
    So, like, regardless of what inter-conflicts
    that may or may not be happening in camp,
  • 25:41 - 25:44
    or that the people on the "other team" the
    cops and the police are creating,
  • 25:44 - 25:49
    - - if we can remember that what they're doing
    is gonna cause more harm than anything,
  • 25:49 - 25:53
    it can help us make better decisions
    as a radical resistance.
  • 25:53 - 25:59
    And it can also help us understand like, what
    kind of help to ask for.
  • 25:59 - 26:02
    And if we don't need help, where to send other
    people so that they can be more effective
  • 26:02 - 26:07
    so that more of these encampments can keep
    popping up in other places in the United Snakes,
  • 26:07 - 26:08
    cause that's the idea.
  • 26:08 - 26:11
    Like this happened here, why can't it happen
    somewhere else?
  • 26:11 - 26:20
    The skillsets that were brought in by folks
    who had been training to fight pipelines
  • 26:20 - 26:21
    was crucial.
  • 26:21 - 26:26
    In many of these coming fights, we're gonna
    see communities who are standing up
  • 26:26 - 26:30
    as they get fed up with how
    the oil companies and gas companies,
  • 26:30 - 26:31
    and mining companies treat them.
  • 26:31 - 26:35
    But they don't have the skillsets
    with them to necessarily bring
  • 26:35 - 26:38
    a solid resistance to those things.
  • 26:38 - 26:44
    While these legal machinations are going on,
    while the public comments are going on,
  • 26:44 - 26:49
    we can't continue to have faith that the process
    will work 'cause the process is rigged.
  • 26:49 - 26:51
    We must go in tandem.
  • 26:51 - 26:57
    And we can hope and we can pray that the easier
    paper route will get a project stopped.
  • 26:57 - 27:02
    But we also need to prepare ourselves and
    prepare our youth in the tactics that they'll
  • 27:02 - 27:07
    need to successfully fight these pipelines
    rather then when all the paper fight is done,
  • 27:07 - 27:10
    all the public comment is done and the thing
    gets approved.
  • 27:10 - 27:14
    That's not the time to start bringing people
    in to get trained.
  • 27:14 - 27:16
    That's the time when you gotta start your
    attack.
  • 27:16 - 27:23
    We have to completely look at ourselves as
    as our whole life is dedicated to the movement.
  • 27:23 - 27:28
    To spark this whole revolution so we can fight
    for our freedom, so we can fight and have
  • 27:28 - 27:32
    what we're fighting for:
    our land, our water, our territory.
  • 27:32 - 27:38
    So we can live where we want,
    hunt where we want, swim where we want,
  • 27:38 - 27:41
    like our ancestors
    before white man came.
  • 27:41 - 27:42
    That's why we're here.
  • 27:46 - 27:51
    On January 24th, Donald Trump signed an executive
    presidential order approving the remaining
  • 27:51 - 27:53
    construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.
  • 27:53 - 27:57
    With the same stroke of the pen, he also gave
    the go-ahead to the Keystone XL pipeline,
  • 27:57 - 28:01
    which had been shelved by the Obama
    administration in 2015 following a multi-year fight
  • 28:01 - 28:03
    by anti-pipeline activists
    and environmental groups.
  • 28:03 - 28:08
    On Thursday February 22nd, an army of state
    and county police, flanked by members of the
  • 28:08 - 28:12
    National Guard and Department of Homeland
    Security, cleared out the last remaining pockets
  • 28:12 - 28:17
    of resistance at the Oceti Sakowin camp,
    bringing a bitter end to the NoDAPL encampment.
  • 28:17 - 28:20
    As we enter into a new phase of struggle
    against ramped up fossil fuel production,
  • 28:20 - 28:23
    and even more unrestrained
    militarization of policing,
  • 28:23 - 28:28
    the dynamics that played out at Sacred Stone
    camp can provide valuable lessons moving forward.
  • 28:28 - 28:31
    These are lessons that our movements
    must learn and properly internalize
  • 28:31 - 28:34
    in order to better prepare us
    for the battles yet to come.
  • 28:34 - 28:36
    With that said, I hope you enjoyed
    this first episode of Trouble.
  • 28:36 - 28:38
    Stay tuned for more to come.
  • 28:38 - 28:42
    These short films are intended to be watched
    in groups and to be used as a resource to
  • 28:42 - 28:44
    promote discussion and collective organizing.
  • 28:44 - 28:47
    Interested in running screenings in your area?
  • 28:47 - 28:48
    Become a Trouble-Maker!
  • 28:48 - 28:51
    For 10 bucks a month, we'll hook you up
    with an advanced copy of the show,
  • 28:51 - 28:55
    and a screening kit featuring additional resources
    and some questions you can use
  • 28:55 - 28:56
    to get a discussion going.
  • 28:56 - 28:59
    If you can't afford to support us financially...
    no worries!
  • 28:59 - 29:05
    You can stream and/or download all of our
    content for free off our website: sub.media/trouble.
  • 29:05 - 29:09
    If you've got any suggestions for show topics
    or just wanna get in touch, drop us a line
  • 29:09 - 29:11
    at trouble@submedia.tv.
  • 29:11 - 29:16
    We produced this documentary with the generous
    assistance of the West Coast Women Warrior
  • 29:16 - 29:18
    Media Cooperative and Mutual Aid Media.
  • 29:18 - 29:20
    Now... get out there and make some trouble!
Title:
vimeo.com/.../208725635
Video Language:
English
Duration:
29:41
  • Calling submedia to update the Dutch subtitles for Trouble on the sub.media website

  • Calling submedia to update the Dutch subtitles for Trouble on the sub.media website

  • Calling submedia to update the Dutch subtitles for Trouble on the sub.media website

  • Ugh sorry for the triple post

  • Thx for the heads up Bariska!

English subtitles

Revisions