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Make the Internet Neutral Again (33c3)

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    33C3 preroll music
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    Herald: "On the internet
    you decide what you do, right?"
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    This is a question that I found on
    your website respectmynet.eu
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    and well, I don't know what you
    think, it sounds quite plausible.
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    But the answer that they give is:
    "Maybe not!" So, who that is,
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    who actually decides what
    you do on the internet and
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    what consequences that has,
    and what you can do against that -
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    these two men will tell you now.
    They are Thomas Lohninger
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    who fought against data retention
    in Austria, and successfully,
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    and he has been very active
    in that politics ever scince.
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    He is here with Christopher Talib
    Campaign Manager for LaQuadratureDeNet,
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    the French NGO fighting
    for civil rights. Welcome!
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    Together they say: Make the Internet
    neutral again! Please give them
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    a warm applause!
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    applause
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    Thomas Lohninger: Thanks, everyone!
    Is the microphone working? Yeah, great.
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    So, first I have to say something for that
    title - if the slides could come up?
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    ... Okay, we don't have slides so far.
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    Talib: Yes we do!
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    Lohninger: So. "Make the internet neutral
    again". When we decided to have this title
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    for our talk, this was of course
    before Donald Trump became elected.
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    Most of our talk will be about how to
    enforce net neutrality, how to really
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    keep the internet free and open. But
    of course, we also have to talk about
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    what will happen in the US. We both work
    on the savetheinternet.eu cmpaign.
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    This common effort of various NGOs
    around Europe started three years ago
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    whe the Commission proposed a very
    disasterous law on net neutrality
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    that would basically abandon the
    principle. And we followed this law
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    throughout the legislative process on
    all stages and then even through
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    with the regulatory implementation. And
    this... you can all see on savetheinternet.eu
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    there's now an archive page. Because...
    let's talk a little bit more about
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    this campaign. What is unique here is that
    we really open-sourced every line of code
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    that we wrote for this campaign. Including
    the tools that we used for contacting
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    your representatives, the members of
    the European Parliament as well as
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    the regulatory agencies. And here you see
    the traffic graph because we also have
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    visitor statistics from pivik (?) throughout
    these three years. And there you can see
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    that we had huge success from
    various players around Europe.
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    From the Netherlands, from huchara (?)
    to the Reddit community. They were awesome.
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    And also change.org, netzpolitik.org, and
    Alexander Lehmann (?) helped us a lot.
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    As well as Firefox which ran a snippet
    for savetheinternet in the last part
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    of the campaign. And in the final stages
    of this fight for net neutrality in Europe
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    we really brought the protests to the
    streets. There were demonstrations
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    in Barcelona, Riga, Bonn, Brussels and
    Vienna. And this was really a group effort.
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    At the end this coalition grew more and
    more, and we had 23 NGOs from 14 countries
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    that joined us in this. And, ultimatively,
    we achieved almost half a million
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    submissions to BEREC, the "Body of
    European Regulators for Electronic
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    Communcations". And this is really
    a historic number. Because all previous
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    consultations of the regulators in Europe
    had a maximum of around 100 comments,
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    so, so inordered (?) process they had so much
    public interest and engagement.
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    And this really changed the landscape
    within the regulators because suddenly
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    they were observed by the public, and
    before that they were basically hiding
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    behind some processes, and not really
    having to engage with at their own
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    constituency (?). If you look at the
    submissions by country you can see
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    that Germany has the largest share.
    This is of course because the debate
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    here in Germany is a little bit
    more nuanced and widespread
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    than in other countries. But still we also
    had the UK and France, and Spain and Italy
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    that contributed a lot through this
    campaign. But I also, being an Austrian,
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    want to point out that a few small
    countries disproportionately contributed
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    with submissions. Austria, Sweden, Denmark
    and Belgium really kicked ass, and that's
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    probably because they had very good NGOs
    that, although most of them only run
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    with volunteers could really mobilize in
    their local language to get the word out,
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    and get people engaged for net neutrality.
    So. We now have this law.
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    And we also have the regulatory
    implementation. So what does it
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    actually say? What type of net neutrality
    do we have now in Europe,
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    for half a Billion people? It is
    no longer possible to just
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    block or censor content based on
    commercial reasons. So you can
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    no longer prohibit users the use of
    VOIP, or messaging, or file sharing
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    in the Terms of Services. There can still
    be blocking for legal reasons. If you have
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    a law, if you have a Court order. But an
    ISP can not arbitrarily start blocking
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    parts of the internet. This is clearly
    prohibited. We have a new right.
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    We have a 'device freedom' now. That means
    that you can connect any type of device
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    to your internet connection. And your ISP
    can no longer charge you e.g. for using
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    your phone's internet on your laptop,
    tethering. That's really cleared (?) and
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    absolutely clear. Also on "specialized
    services". I'm particularly happy
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    that we reached this result because this
    was maybe 60% of the whole debate
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    in the European Parliament and throughout
    the legislative process: what should we do
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    with "specialized services"? And
    originally, they were intended to be
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    the loophole for net neutrality, to
    circumvent the whole net neutrality
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    by just making some service
    a specialized service. But now we really
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    limited this danger to something that is
    handleable, and now a specialized service
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    can only be something which could
    technically not work over the open internet.
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    And you can see this clear here, I mean,
    that's a picture from the video
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    that Facebook shows you when you have
    your birthday. And I found this so telling,
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    because this power plug with a Facebook
    sign is exactly what a specialized service
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    in the bad reading would be. It is
    no longer a universal connection
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    that allows you to use
Title:
Make the Internet Neutral Again (33c3)
Description:

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Video Language:
English
Duration:
32:00

English subtitles

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