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Define Stage | Design Sprint | Product Design | Udacity

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    So once you have a good
    understanding of the problem,
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    you move to the define stage.
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    Could you tell us
    a little bit about that?
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    >> Yeah, I love the define stage.
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    So we started not by rushing to
    solutions, but by understanding.
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    Second, we move to something that
    would be absolutely amazing and
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    favorite for
    everyone who likes analysis.
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    The define stage is about
    finding a strategy and
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    analyzing what is the best path to
    actually arrive at the solution.
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    During this stage, all of the exercises
    that someone is familiar with
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    around product strategy become very,
    very applicable.
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    Let's list a few examples.
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    The define stage can be greatly enhanced
    if people pause to describe the user
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    journey that they're working
    to create for the user.
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    A user journey is a storyboard that
    helps define the major pieces,
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    step by step, of someone experiencing
    the product for the very first time
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    when they don't know anything about it,
    towards the time when they become
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    a masterful user and they're maybe
    even evangelizing it to their friends.
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    >> So I actually need to write
    what the user name is and
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    what do they do with the app?
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    >> Well, that's a great question.
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    You might not need to have a user
    name for the user journey.
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    What you're trying to find
    is what is the most common
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    path that someone will take.
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    From a perspective of
    not knowing anything,
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    towards being able to use it over and
    over again.
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    Now within that,
    there may be other stories.
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    For example, if you're working on an app
    that's reviewing local restaurants,
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    there may be one journey for
    people who are writing the reviews, and
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    another journey for
    people who are reading the reviews.
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    From those two, the most common path
    would be someone hearing about your app.
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    Hey, there's this great local app,
    this can be in a newspaper,
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    this can be in a restaurant, and
    you need to plan for that, because
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    if you don't plan for the discover
    moment, it's just not going to happen.
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    So you look at it as how
    are people discovering my app?
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    After that, it's about how
    are they starting to use it?
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    Well, that may mean that they
    download it, and then afterwards,
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    they're starting to search for
    restaurants, read about them, and
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    then they get reminded after
    they've been somewhere potentially,
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    that they need to write a review.
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    So let's say the most common path.
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    The user journey has many
    names in the industry.
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    Because design is a relatively
    new discipline in technology,
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    there have been many different
    ways to refer to that.
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    Some people refer to the user
    journey as a storyboard.
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    In fact, what we know from
    design history is that Disney
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    was the first person to use storyboards.
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    Disney had a team of artists and
    technologists who had
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    to make the first animated movies
    before anyone knew how to make that.
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    So in order to keep everybody
    on the same page, and
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    not to waste money,
    he created the storyboard that said,
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    moment after moment,
    what is happening to his characters.
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    And that first storyboard, which was
    about the movie Snow White, helped
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    organize his team, and set a precedent
    that teams continue to use today.
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    So if you're using a storyboard,
    you have Disney to thank for that.
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    >> And a quick follow-up on that, so how
    do I know that I have enough stories,
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    that I've completed all the stories.
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    >> So this is a great question.
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    The user journey is the idea that
    there's one central story that is
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    the most important.
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    Another name for
    that is the Golden Path.
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    That actually comes from Microsoft.
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    In Microsoft, or so the story goes,
    the teams refer to the golden path as
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    the experience that is absolutely
    key for the product to work,
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    for the users to come and
    get what they want.
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    The Golden Path is
    supported by red threads.
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    These are the little stories that help
    make it possible, and there can be many,
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    many little thread such as the user sign
    in, potentially the shopping experience.
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    But if the Golden Path is your discovery
    process then that's what needs to be
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    really easy, really key and all efforts
    in the company need to be focused there.
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    So why is it important to be clear
    of one most important user journey?
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    Well, we believe that it is
    important to prioritize, and
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    if you don't know what your app is
    going to be most commonly used for,
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    then it's really difficult to know
    how all the other things fall out.
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    So, we recommend to always focus
    on one central user journey, and
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    to make sure that it is easy and
    effortless for people to achieve that.
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    It's important to plan for everything.
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    We see a lot of startups fail because
    they have created a great product but
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    they don't have any plan for
    how they're going to be discovered.
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    In that way, they're building
    little islands in the ocean, and
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    there's no line there that will
    ever take passengers there.
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    This is why we remind people,
    plan the entire journey.
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    Plan your product in all of the
    different stages, from the time when no
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    one knows about it, towards the time
    when they're really masterful.
Title:
Define Stage | Design Sprint | Product Design | Udacity
Video Language:
English
Team:
Udacity
Project:
UD509 - Product Design
Duration:
04:45

English (United States) subtitles

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