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Fabrizio Bartoli, Lucia Bartolotti organize a discussion of the cMOOC ltis13

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    [//// PLEASE DO NOT ALTER THE NUMBER OF LINES][Vance Stevens] Welcome everybody.
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    This is Vance Stevens in Abu Dhabi and we're in a Learning 2gether session on June 23rd, 2013.
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    We have an interesting story about how this session started.
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    I suppose I should let the participants introduce themselves, but very briefly:
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    we're going to be talking about a MOOC, LTIS13, a cMOOC that found Learning 2gether
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    and we can talk a little bit about how that happened and how this session came about.
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    But we'd like to welcome our participants.
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    I'm not sure if I might leave somebody out, but we've got Fabrizio Bartoli and we've got Luisella Mori and Gioachino
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    and, I suppose, all participants of the MOOC, and we've got Lucia - let's see, she's also - Bartolotti - Lucia Bartollotti.
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    And if anybody else is here, they can introduce themselves.
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    Rita has joined us from Argentina and Claire has joined us from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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    And so, let the people in LTIS13 introduce themselves. How are you today?
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    [Fabrizio Bartoli] Hello everybody, I'm Fabrizio Bartoli and I'm a teacher.
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    I teach English as a foreign language here, in Acireale with children between 11 and 13 at the scuola media.
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    I joined this MOOC a few weeks ago and - we're going to talk about it in a few minutes.
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    I leave the mike to Luisa maybe.
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    Or Lucia, do you want to introduce yourself?
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    I don't - I can go on, but I think we're having a round in introducing ourselves, am I right?
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    [Vance Stevens] Yeah: let's -- anybody who wants to speak, introduce themselves and say why you're here.
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    That includes Rita and anybody else just joining us.
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    [Claude Almansi] Sono Claude e -- I am Claude and I am also a participant in the LTIS13 MOOC.
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    I'll leave the mike to someone else as well.
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    [Luisella Mori] I'm Luisella from Italy and I'm also a participant in this MOOC.
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    [Vance Stevens] OK, well, I'll tell the interesting story about how LTIS13 found Learning 2gether.
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    Errh, as you know, I just ported all our Posterous recordings, our archives of Learning 2gether into WordPress
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    and it was - yes, oh, Lucia, now we didn't hear you. Let me get you to introduce yourself, you press the Talk button.
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    The Talk button is just below the big black space: it probably says "Vance Stevens" on it right now. So you can try. Go ahead.
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    [Lucia Bartolotti] OK, now -- Oh yes, now you can hear me: I can see the icon of the microphone.
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    OK, this is Lucia from Trieste, which is in the North of Italy.
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    I'm very glad to be here and let's see what we can do together.
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    [Vance Stevens] Great, OK. So nice to meet all of you.
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    There's a feature in WordPress that allows people -- well, first of all, I should say that I'm getting quite --
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    when I started the WordPress blog -- I'm getting a lot of spam posts.
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    So I'm a little bit wary about things that are coming to my e-mail.
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    And one of those things that started coming was I found people from this MOOC were reposting my blogs
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    and I wasn't sure why they might do that -- maybe I can find the link with the comments in a moment, where you can see how it happened --
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    but I didn't understand what they were doing, but Lucia came -- commented on my comment and explained that they had just started this MOOC.
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    And they seemed like friendly people, as cMOOC people are, so --
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    and we are a MOOC-like kind of group, we have something called Electronic Village Online,
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    which you surely, from Italy, are welcome to join us.
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    We can talk more about that later, but it's a serious of lots of -- it's been going on since 2001, I think.
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    So for the last 10 years, there have been annual sessions, but we can tell you more about that.
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    But it's kind of a MOOC, so we're -- the people in our group are trying very much to share information with one another across the world.
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    And so, that's how we hooked up and Lucia and Fabrizio and Luisella and Claude and Gioachino - I'm sorry I'm mispronouncing this --
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    but in any event, they all participated in the MOOC and they agreed to come and join us to tell us more about it.
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    So I think that's what Fabrizio is going to start to do right now. (6:07)
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    [Fabrizio] I happened to reblog a post with an interesting webinar and...
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    And that's what I usually do, I mean, I just find something interesting on the Web
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    - it might be a webinar , or a resource or a tutorial about a Web tool -
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    and either I bookmark on Diigo and then share it with my -- with the group, I mean, or on my blog.
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    And I was in this - it is a group-- a MOOC and it is a Diigo group as well.
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    And so I thought they might be interested in joining.
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    So I just did it. It was a bit naive maybe, but I just reblogged it without any comments.
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    And after that I thought, OK, it was a bit rude of me, not saying anything, why and all this stuff
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    You hardly ever have the time to do all that ... you just, you know,click the button and go on to the next thing.
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    But it was, it was nice, it was -- you know, we had the chance to meet together
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    and I had the chance to meet Vance again, because I followed one of his webinars with the EVO session this year
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    and I thought it was a great chance to put the two things together, two really big events. And with really experienced people.
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    [Vance Stevens] Well, I'm quite interested in your MOOC, and especially this document that you and Lucia - and Claude I believe - have been working on
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    and that's the one that's on the screen - on the webshare right now.
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    And if you scroll through it, you can find that -- let me read something from it if I can find it.
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    There's a philosophy: "Who should join this MOOC?" Let me see if I can find it, just scrolling down.
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    But that's worth commenting on if I - I'm getting way down here. Here we go.
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    "Potential inhabitants of the MOOC:
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    Those who fear everything will disappear if they press the wrong key: this village is for them.
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    Those who are thinking 'Where the deuce are the instructions?'
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    Well, they don't have to like this method, maybe this method is not for them."
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    [paraphrasing] There are different ways to do these things... They might decide to go somewhere else, but this is a rich and varied way of working.
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    "On the contrary, those who are fed up with strict instructions"
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    [paraphrasing] who will see different points of view and engage in critical thinking, will like this MOOC.
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    "Those who already know it all don't really need to be here", of course.
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    I like the way that's expressed.
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    "Those who think they're going to get some university credits here", they're wasting their time anyway. [quote marks checked] So
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    you can see that there is a philosophy here that's very much in keeping with George Siemens's philosophy of MOOC.
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    He says that he likes this way of teaching, because he thinks that chaos is necessary in learning
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    and where, as you've said, where the instructions are already there,
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    George Siemens says that the instructor is setting the paths for the student to walk and the student learns better if the student finds his own path.
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    So that's one of-- his famous philosophy in an interview he gave with Howard Rheingold, he expressed it like that.
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    So, well, tell us more about your MOOC: how did your MOOC get started, and - oh, someone has just shifted the screen over to Learning 2gether,
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    which is what we're doing right now: this event, you can see, is our June 23rd event that's announced here.
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    So, how did you start the MOOC? How did you come to participate in it? What did you learn from it? And so on. (10:34)
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    [Lucia] OK, so I'll start. I'm a member of teachers' network, which is called "La scuola che funziona"
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    - in English it is "the school that works" -
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    and they sent a newsletter, informing all members that this thing was going to start.
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    So I just registered.
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    I didn't expect anything because I was sure I would leave in a couple of days.
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    So I said "Well, I'm just going to lurk and see what happens," and then I got hooked.
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    And this is very much the philosophy of our professor. He said sometime during the course:
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    "We want to hook our students, and then to hold them, and then to launch them into new worlds.
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    This is the only way we can convince them to face the challenge and try and learn.
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    And this is very true for all students, even our students, I think.
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    On to somebody else. [11.51]
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    [Fabrizio] I don't know if anybody else would like to have a go with the microphone?
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    Otherwise I can go on.
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    I got to know about this MOOC because I was in another university course with University Line, "Lingue nella rete"
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    and they advertised the MOOC, it sounded interesting.
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    It was the first one I actually had seen here in Italy.
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    So I said: "Why not?"
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    And as I tried to explain in my "impressions" that I -- posted them beforehand --
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    it was really different from any former experiences of MOOCs. (12:45)
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    Here, you had no fixed assignments, no -- very flexible times and as I said, a lot of talking
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    nice talking, very high quality talking about things that mattered for education,
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    the philosophy behind what we do when we use technology and when we try to integrate technology,
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    a lot of coding, which was something really new to me and I'm-- am willing to learn.
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    It's a hard job.
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    And a lot of people with a great experience behind, so, really a lot to learn, I mean.
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    [Vance] You're probably familiar with the -- the videos of Dave Cormier.
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    He's put up videos about how a MOOC progresses,
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    for example it starts off with declaring your intentions, why you are there in the MOOC.
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    And then he works through orienting in the MOOC,
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    and then networking with other people, eventually collaborating with them.
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    And he says that the main thing that you take away from a MOOC is the network.
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    And I find that to be so true: when I interact in a MOOC, I generally meet people that I didn't know before.
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    Did you find that to be true? I mean, your network --
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    well, one reason I'm interested is that is because our networks collided at the WordPress blog and that brought us together.
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    And so, here again, we increase our network, we find like-minded people
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    in other places that, you know, that gives us other people to follow and to learn more about what they do
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    and to bring them as -- how learning together works.
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    So, did you find that you met a lot of new people in the cMOOC that you just finished?
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    Did you know each other before, the people who are here now, or did you meet just in the MOOC?
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    [Fabrizio] Ah no. Personally I didn't know anybody: I didn't know Lucia, didn't know Claude, Luisella
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    or, you know, Andreas, who is the teacher and a super teacher (15:13)
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    nobody at all.
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    It was a pleasure because being an English teacher, I'm always searching for English resources,
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    English websites and in English language and having to do with technology and -- it's exactly the same.
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    But now I'm finding out that there are lots of resources thanks to this MOOC and
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    It's true Claude: we had a ..very strong chat on the Google Drive, talking about the Italian resources and--- we'll keep on later.
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    But I think, yes, things are improving a lot in Italy and there are a lot of people I didn't even know of and they are doing a good job. (16:08)
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    It was a very important chance to meet other people here in Italy,
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    doing-- getting interested and involved in technology and online courses.
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    [Vance] Do you find that, as an English teacher in Italy, do you find it hard to, in your context, let's say, that is where you speak English
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    and all of you could address this.
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    First of all, you're an English teacher. I don't really know what the others do.
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    Were the people in the MOOC mostly English teachers or the --
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    For example, Rita teaches English, Claire teaches English, I'm an English teacher.
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    So, we're like-minded in that way and we expand our networks through participation in MOOCs, and also in learning 2gether,
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    and in a community we call WebHeads, and other communities that we follow as well,
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    TESOL for example, Teachers of [English to] Speakers of Other Languages.
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    I met Claire first through that, many, many years ago.
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    So, do you find that it's difficult to connect with like-minded teachers if you don't use a MOOC
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    or the MOOC -- did it, you know, expand your horizons to find out there other people who thought like you? [17.35]
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    [Lucia] Well, there are a couple of questions there.
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    I already knew a few of my colleagues, here in the MOOC but the vast majority was unknown to me.
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    And the vast majority was not made of teachers of English.
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    I think most of them are teachers from primary school,
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    because primary school teachers are very innovative here in Italy,
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    they're very active and creative,
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    and so they like joining in and sharing new ideas, they are very interactive, so to speak,
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    But interaction in the cMOOC started from the start.
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    I need to explain a little how it worked so that your guests can understand how it did work,
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    So it started from the professor's blog.
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    He already had his blog and he used it to give us the first instructions.
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    And the interesting thing is that at the second post he published, there were as many as, I think, 260-something comments.
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    And people already started interacting there.
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    So they would - they would speak to each other through comments,
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    for example: "Oh you Davide, comment number so and so, I would like to tell you this and that."
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    So interaction started from the very start.
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    This was very interesting.
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    [Vance] Did you find the comments overwhelming?
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    I notice -- I'm just looking at the figures: there were almost 500 people, thousands of comments.
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    How do you keep up with so many comments?
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    Or do you find that you can't keep up with so many comments?
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    One of the things -- one of the steps in the MOOC that Cormier points out is where you cluster.
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    That is, you find half a dozen or a dozen people that you start interacting with in the MOOC, and forget the other 450.
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    Did you find it worked that way? [19.59]
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    [Fabrizio] I got lost at -- right from the beginning.
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    And it took me a while to see how it worked and all of this, the mail, the chat, the Diigo group and --
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    It's quite complicated in a way, very difficult to get in touch with all of the participants. (20:26)
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    we've got a huge amount of posts and if you don't have enough time,
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    it's quite difficult to keep in touch with everything.
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    [Lucia] Well...[metallic-like noise].
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    Sorry: that was an ambulance going by.
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    Ok, yes. Well, we're adults, so we all have families and we have jobs
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    and it was the end of the school year.
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    So, it is really remarkable that we spent so many hours doing the cMooc.
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    Really professor Formiconi had us hooked. [21.15]
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    [Vance] He sounds like a great teacher.
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    I'm just reading again, to the bottom of your list
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    of what the cMooc, "A few figures" -- and I noticed that
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    some people did it for a university credit.
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    That's one of -- that's an issue in Moocs is -- it's supposed to be a Massive Open Online Course
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    but it's perfectly fine if you want to run one that will accredit people.
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    That's actually one of the problems, that Moocs don't provide credit
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    so people are looking into badge systems and
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    of course, if you can run it through a university
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    and get university credits that's fine.
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    But the question is, are the materials open, that is,
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    can anybody... I suppose so, you must have had 430 people
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    who were able to go freely onto the Internet and find the materials.
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    [22.11] So are those materials still up there
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    in which case they will be open and anybody can go and look at them
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    and learn from them? Is that the way the course works?
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    [Lucia] Well, there weren't any separate materials.
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    There were the posts that professor Formiconi published
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    and he gave us his instructions there and he commented on what we were doing and how we were doing it.
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    [22.43 ] We worked through comments maybe, as you can see from the numbers there
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    and the material was made by us, the pupils.
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    I mean, we were instructed to create..
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    He used this metaphor of the village
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    He said: Ok, we are going to build the village all together.
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    In the village we're going to build houses, and the houses will be blogs that we're going to create
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    Then we're going to build roads, and this will be via a web feed aggregator.
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    And so we learned to import an OPML file and to aggregate the news from the blogs
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    [23.32] to link the blogs together and so we had a network
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    and we didn't need any other material, in that everybody started writing on their blogs
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    and we kept going around and visiting and reading and commenting
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    and then professor Formiconi introduced the next thing, or the next task which was to use tags
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    and he presented us with the idea of classifying the information
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    and wrote a long philosophical work about classifying and how you classify,
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    what folksonomia is and so on, so we started classifying quite freely. [24.13]
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    Then something kept on emerging - kept on emerging.
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    And so it was creative. It was chaotic on the one side but very clearly structured at the same time on the other side.
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    So, I hope I've been clear about how the thing went on.[24.39]
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    [Fabrizio] I agree with Lucia and I just wanted to say thanks again---
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    It was a bit shocking at the beginning, the difference between this Mooc and the others.
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    I didn't even dare to ask where are the assignments and where is the syllabus,
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    because there wasn't a blog or a Moodle block where you have all the assignments divided in weeks and all the rest,
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    the usual way you find in an online course or in a Mooc.
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    It looked, it seemed very improvised. I'm sure it wasn't, but that was the way they chose.
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    [25.34] Having things to ...- how can I say - to grow along.
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    We had to find our way through the course, we had to pick up that pulse with the right assignments
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    and try to do it by yourself
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    There wasn't even...as far as I know,a proper evaluation or assessment
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    no fixed days,
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    you know, first week you do this, second week you do that and then you get graded
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    and things are going on, now, we keep doing that, that's a great thing, it never stops.
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    [Vance] Yes, actually, Lucia's question was she making things clear: yes,
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    and the course as I understand is over, We are coming into summer now, so...
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    But you're continuing to meet in your community, your community continues, that's really interesting.
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    I have a question about the OPML aggregation:
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    how would you access each other's blogs? Is there a link where the aggregation occurred,
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    so that you could go to one place and see the posts?
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    How would you see the aggregation of everybody's blogs? How did you see that?
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    [Claude] Can I try? The OPML file gathers all the RSS feeds of our blogs,
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    so when you add that OPML file to an aggregator, for example Bloglines or RSSowl
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    then you could see everything that's happening in the blogs,
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    because there's a feed for the posts, and a feed for the comments for each blog.
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    So it's a very long file, but it works. Is that clear?
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    [Vance] Yes, that's clear.
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    So, I'm going to really miss Google Reader. They're threatening to get rid of it, but that's what I would, erh --
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    because with Google Reader you can... I suppose you can use an OPML file, within Bloglines, yes, OK.
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    So... Yes, I can see how you can use an RSS reader to read an OPML file into your... into a reader.
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    So, that's very good, that's... getting the basics.
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    And then -- yes, ok, anything that aggregates content, anything that will take an RSS feed, I think you can put it there.
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    So that's really good, that you got the building block, and then you learned how to build on that.
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    And I also liked, as you said, I like the analogy of building the cities and then the streets connecting them
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    I think that's ... that's really interesting.
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    It sounds very much like what George Siemens would set up
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    and one thing that fascinates me about Moocs is,
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    of course the big problem is, Where is the centre? Where do you go, that's what Fabrizio has been expressing,
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    confusion at first. How do you orient in a Mooc?
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    You have to find the streets, you have to find the the ways... the highways that people are using
  • 29:34 - 29:42
    and of course you can't find it all, which, that's the way the world is, you don't ever learn everything.
  • 29:42 - 29:53
    [29.46] So, anyway, if you can speak of any techniques that helped you to find the things that other people were doing
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    the OPML file would be one, you could see their blog posts
  • 29:56 - 29:59
    I note that you must have shared bookmarks.
  • 29:59 - 30:05
    You said 990 tags produced: so, can you tell me about that?
  • 30:05 - 30:07
    What were -- you were tagging all over the place, obviously
  • 30:07 - 30:14
    but when you say "tags were produced", how did you find the 990 tags, let's say?
  • 30:20 - 30:28
    [Fabrizio] As I was trying to explain in the chat, I've also tried to - I've been trying since when things started
  • 30:28 - 30:32
    to put things together, to put the blogs together, for example, [30:32]
  • 30:32 - 30:39
    All the blogs were too many, actually. At present one of the problems is, there's more than 200.
  • 30:39 - 30:42
    With then all the usual tools
  • 30:42 - 30:49
    we used to bookmark, and-or visual book -- have visual bookmarking of the resources
  • 30:49 - 30:57
    So, there's a padlet board that is available inside the Google Drive and in the wikispace,
  • 30:57 - 31:02
    and I've also tried to do something on Pinterest
  • 31:02 - 31:13
    And we've got a Diigo group for the MOOC that's working very very well
  • 31:13 - 31:21
    And I'm also trying to have a map with the new Google map engine
  • 31:21 - 31:30
    using the spreadsheet the teacher kindly shared through the Google Drive
  • 31:30 - 31:35
    and it is interesting, you can have all the blogs on a map
  • 31:35 - 31:46
    and being based on a spreadsheet, you can work on it, now, have them on different layers according to the tags,
  • 31:46 - 31:58
    that is, the main tags, the secondary-- and later we... I think we can have them on different layers, so
  • 31:58 - 32:07
    as regards the kind of school, primary schools, the secondary schools or the language:
  • 32:07 - 32:14
    something interesting to work on for the future. For me, at least. I'm studying that.
  • 32:19 - 32:31
    [32.22 Lucia] It is very interesting to see what professor Formiconi did to promote interaction between us.
  • 32:31 - 32:38
    Sometimes he would encourage us to meet in order to do some very practical things
  • 32:38 - 32:47
    For example there was a moment when he was introducing some very very basic XML code
  • 32:47 - 32:59
    and so he opened a pad in piratepad.net and he had us go and watch there and experiment
  • 32:59 - 33:05
    on the shared pad: so an experiment with some shared writing.
  • 33:05 - 33:13
    At moments, some other moments he would just stop and step back and watch and wait
  • 33:13 - 33:19
    and he used silence in a very active way. I know it sounds strange
  • 33:19 - 33:29
    but he would use silence and waiting as an active tool in order to give us time to know each other.
  • 33:29 - 33:35
    So... It was great fun! I was very tired in the evening,
  • 33:35 - 33:42
    I would do the washing up and then I would sit in front of my computer and then dive into Bloglines,
  • 33:42 - 33:51
    literally dive among the blogs and read it here and there and contact people and read a comment here and there,
  • 33:51 - 34:01
    and very soon I found the people who were most similar to me in a way or who had similar interests
  • 34:01 - 34:08
    and it was clear that we were interacting more often than with other people.
  • 34:08 - 34:13
    I'm quite aware that I don't know most of the people who were there
  • 34:13 - 34:21
    and I mean to go on exploring, because I think that there's riches there in the course.
  • 34:21 - 34:24
    The course will go on living for a long time for me, I think.
  • 34:28 - 34:31
    [34.29 Vance] Look, that's very interesting.
  • 34:31 - 34:33
    Steven Downes, I'm sure you're familiar with him,
  • 34:34 - 34:45
    says that the teacher's role is to model and demonstrate and the students' role is to practice and reflect.
  • 34:46 - 34:54
    And Dave Warlick says that teachers are really master learners, and to me that means
  • 34:54 - 35:00
    that teachers are both teachers and learners at the same time,
  • 35:00 - 35:05
    that is, they're always modelling, demonstrating, practising and reflecting.
  • 35:05 - 35:14
    So it works like you make coffee, you know: you percolate these four things, and do that all the time.
  • 35:14 - 35:23
    So this is obviously a teacher who models and demonstrates and then you practise and reflect
  • 35:23 - 35:29
    and with your students it's your turn to model and demonstrate.
  • 35:29 - 35:36
    And I'm wondering, have you applied these techniques in courses that you yourselves have created? Have you--
  • 35:36 - 35:42
    How have you applied the techniques you learned from your professor in your work
  • 35:42 - 35:47
    and... Not yet, says Lucia. Ok. Or maybe, how would you anticipate doing that,
  • 35:47 - 35:53
    how would you structure courses, so that you can use some of these things that have been modelled to you
  • 35:53 - 35:59
    and as you say, you're reflecting now and you're thinking - how can I ..
  • 35:59 - 36:06
    I'm learning so much from this, how can I do it, how can I... so, I don't go into my first classroom
  • 36:06 - 36:08
    and tell the students: "Open your textbooks", you know?
  • 36:08 - 36:14
    How would you make that leak now into your own work, your own courses that you teach?
  • 36:18 - 36:22
    [Lucia] Well, this is a very hard question, Vance, because...
  • 36:24 - 36:35
    For example, I teach in a high school, and in this high school we have a lot of limitations I would say.
  • 36:35 - 36:43
    I don't feel free to create and explore. If you like.... you have to do things, in a way.
  • 36:43 - 36:55
    So I feel the most important lesson I'm taking from this MOOC is, you really need to hook your students,
  • 36:55 - 37:01
    you need to create something that hooks them, so that they will be willing to explore.
  • 37:01 - 37:11
    Actually with what we - with what I do every day, I try to be creative, but I'm not very successful, in fact,
  • 37:11 - 37:21
    and so my students, who are supposed to be digital natives and are not...
  • 37:21 - 37:26
    resist me, they push back. So, this is going to be a great challenge.
  • 37:30 - 37:34
    [37.30 Vance] Maybe Rita.. She's still here, she's commenting on the chat,
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    maybe you can talk a little bit about how you motivate your students
  • 37:38 - 37:44
    because we've been participating in a community of practice called Webheads for a long time,
  • 37:44 - 37:53
    and some of the things that we do to help each other to learn, we apply to our own students.
  • 37:54 - 38:00
    I guess I'm thinking of writing matrix (?[metrics?]) just off the top of my head but I'm sure there are other things as well.
  • 38:00 - 38:05
    Maybe Rita you would like to address how you use the things that you've learned
  • 38:05 - 38:08
    from interacting with other teachers, in your own courses.
  • 38:10 - 38:13
    [38.10 Rita] Yes Vance thank you very much for giving me the floor.
  • 38:13 - 38:21
    Yes, you know, we started working together on this integration of technology many many years ago,
  • 38:23 - 38:35
    and in fact when I started, that was about 2002 or 03, nobody here was really into technology,
  • 38:35 - 38:40
    so I must have looked to people as a kind of a freak.
  • 38:40 - 38:48
    But anyhow I tried to understand that, well, my students were new to this as well
  • 38:48 - 38:57
    and the crucial thing was motivating them, to make them feel this question, I mean
  • 38:57 - 39:04
    the thing that they had been learning English for so many years and using it in a very limited context
  • 39:04 - 39:10
    the environment in which we teach our students is very constrained, I mean
  • 39:10 - 39:14
    we just do everything within the four walls of the classroom
  • 39:14 - 39:21
    and in Argentina, same as in Italy, both... maybe in Italy it's a little bit different,
  • 39:21 - 39:27
    but we don't have too many people ready on the streets to speak naturally with students in English
  • 39:27 - 39:33
    so students are not used to practising their English in an everyday context.
  • 39:33 - 39:39
    So I tried to make them realize the importance of their being learning English for so many years
  • 39:39 - 39:48
    and I also tried to see what it was that motivated them to use English in natural contexts [39.48]
  • 39:48 - 39:57
    such as, for example, the possibility of getting together with other students from other countries
  • 39:57 - 40:02
    with whom they would be able to interact, to pass on information, share experience
  • 40:02 - 40:14
    even see in fact, what life was, in other places, in other countries, and share in what they were interested in
  • 40:14 - 40:21
    so I tried to see what it was that each group would be motivated by
  • 40:21 - 40:31
    and by.. by saying this, I'm really implying that the most important thing in teaching with technology
  • 40:31 - 40:34
    is motivating our students,
  • 40:34 - 40:41
    because we can see that on a computer they learn [check] how to really work with a programme, with a new tool
  • 40:41 - 40:46
    but the most challenging thing for us teachers is motivation,
  • 40:46 - 40:50
    how to see what students would be interested in,
  • 40:50 - 40:59
    what appeals to students, to come up with a tool and with a new task that they will enjoy working on.
  • 40:59 - 41:01
    In fact that's it, really.
  • 41:04 - 41:09
    [Vance] And I think it's so important, as our Italian colleagues pointed out,
  • 41:09 - 41:16
    that you let the students build their own highways, you know, put [up] their own content.
  • 41:16 - 41:23
    I really like that kind of concept, where the teacher doesn't build the course
  • 41:23 - 41:30
    the teacher sort of makes a Petri dish, and then the students populate it, you know,
  • 41:30 - 41:39
    and you find out their interests that way. So obviously, they've been motivated. That's really interesting. [41.39]
  • 41:42 - 41:47
    Ok, we have about 10 minutes, or even 13 or 20 minutes
  • 41:47 - 41:53
    it's really up to you, we don't have any... nobody closes us down at any time.
  • 41:53 - 41:57
    [Referring to the shared screen] So, well, I've put a web page up in the share...
  • 41:58 - 42:03
    I think in one of my versions of it, there is -- that from English,
  • 42:03 - 42:06
    but I don't know, maybe you can tell a bit about this page,
  • 42:06 - 42:12
    this must be the page that... organized the MOOC, that announced the MOOC
  • 42:13 - 42:17
    so you can comment on it for those of us who aren't so good with Italian.
  • 42:25 - 42:29
    [42.25] So, I'll really st-- oh I'm sorry, I'm having trouble releasing the mike, let me try that.
  • 42:31 - 42:37
    [Vance] Oh, not sure what's going on here, let me just -- [clattering noise]
  • 42:37 - 42:41
    I'm so sorry I'm not able to release the mike.
  • 42:41 - 42:47
    It's not responding ...] Oh, oh, I see, I've got an error message on my computer also,
  • 42:47 - 42:51
    I might have to go back, I might have to come back in as a session moderator,
  • 42:51 - 42:56
    I might click "close programme", I'm not sure what'll happen, but anyway, I'll do that.
  • 43:02 - 43:04
    Yeah, I think I've solved the problem.
  • 43:04 - 43:11
    So, the page I've just put up: this is an announcement of the MOOC, in case there's anything to comment there,
  • 43:12 - 43:17
    you can, if not, we can pass on to some other things we can show you.
  • 43:18 - 43:23
    Are you ready for any other questions that anybody else has...
  • 43:23 - 43:25
    Would you like to ask questions of each other?
  • 43:30 - 43:33
    [43.27 Lucia, referring to the shared screen] What you can see is the teacher's blog.
  • 43:33 - 43:39
    So, this is where he wrote his tasks and comments and philosophy and everything.
  • 43:42 - 43:49
    We also had video tutorials, he published 23 video tutorials here.
  • 43:53 - 43:58
    [43.52 Vance] Ah, ok, yes, I was confusing Lucia with Rita, I wasn't sure who was that.
  • 43:59 - 44:04
    OK: I'm going to pull out something that one of our teachers is doing.
  • 44:04 - 44:12
    We have a teacher in Amazonia, who has been using some of these techniques with her own students.
  • 44:12 - 44:19
    And recently in Brazil they've been having protests, and so she organized her students to...
  • 44:19 - 44:25
    She's already connected with Webheads on a few of her students' projects,
  • 44:25 - 44:28
    Webheads had been commenting on her students' blogs,
  • 44:29 - 44:37
    but the one they did just recently, she said it was the best thing she had ever done in her career,
  • 44:37 - 44:40
    and that was getting the students to put online...
  • 44:40 - 44:44
    Because they've found an audience, you know, so they are motivated to connect with the audience.
  • 44:44 - 44:50
    The audience in Webheads is responding to them, you know, commenting on their blogs,
  • 44:50 - 44:53
    and with Cintia's encouragement
  • 44:53 - 45:01
    And so I'll find that URL and put it there, and show you some stuff from somebody in our community
  • 45:01 - 45:06
    who is motivating her students using these techniques, give me a moment here.
  • 45:06 - 45:09
    Please continue. [pause]
  • 45:11 - 45:19
    Ok, keep in mind we're recording, we're hoping to have the conversation continue.
  • 45:19 - 45:23
    Oh, I should say, by the way, that this is an event of...
  • 45:23 - 45:29
    Ah, well yes, ok, that's a good one. Let me... I'll share that.
  • 45:29 - 45:37
    That's not the one I was looking for, but this is actually a MOOC that we participate in,
  • 45:37 - 45:42
    "Goodbye Gutenberg", this is something that started.out as a multiliteraces course
  • 45:43 - 45:49
    and, ah, I'm just trying to type its URL in here.
  • 45:50 - 45:59
    OK: yeah, this is... we've turned this into a MOOC concept. It was... What this is, it's a...
  • 46:02 - 46:06
    Let's...somebody just switched this back to... Yep, ok,
  • 46:06 - 46:11
    Ok, maybe I can grab this ...
  • 46:14 - 46:19
    We're having more technical difficulties here. We have ... one of the moderators...
  • 46:19 - 46:26
    switched us back to the - to us off the 'web share'
  • 46:26 - 46:34
    So now I'm trying to get the URL back in there. Ok, so this is the Goodbye Gutenberg blog here.
  • 46:35 - 46:40
    Ok, so, there used to be a way to put this into the text chat.
  • 46:40 - 46:42
    Oh, you've put it in there already. [46.42]
  • 46:44 - 46:52
    So that's -- what that tries to do is to try to get participants to make -- to keep ePortfolios.
  • 46:52 - 46:56
    Is that a concept that you would think that your teacher had?
  • 46:56 - 47:01
    You know, it could be, what you're doing is making ePortfolios, that is, commenting on your own learning:
  • 47:01 - 47:03
    that is, in a way, an ePortfolio.
  • 47:04 - 47:09
    An ePortfolio can be just about anything, depending on how you like to interpret it.
  • 47:09 - 47:19
    But in this particular Web page here, you'll find the links to Dave Cormier's videos.
  • 47:19 - 47:21
    - maybe I can find those for you -
  • 47:21 - 47:27
    there is a -- and also a reference to George Siemens's interview with Howard Rheingold.
  • 47:28 - 47:30
    I think that will be here, on this page.
  • 47:30 - 47:32
    I just clicked on "Getting started."
  • 47:32 - 47:40
    And there, you find a link to Siemens' conversation with Howard Rheingold
  • 47:40 - 47:44
    and also Dave Cormier's videos.
  • 47:44 - 47:48
    So there are some links that you can follow there.
  • 47:48 - 47:55
    OK, I'm gonna go back to searching for the page I was looking for.
  • 47:59 - 48:06
    OK: I've found it. There's going to be a little dead space in the recording there, but that's OK.
  • 48:07 - 48:10
    OK, so this is one of the teachers who interacts with us
  • 48:11 - 48:15
    -- oh, it looks like it's in Portuguese, but of course, you can translate that.
  • 48:16 - 48:16
    But in any event, her students have posted some videos.
  • 48:22 - 48:29
    I suppose "Our generation does care," that's the one that she had her students do.
  • 48:29 - 48:33
    That's it, yeah, so that link will come up - should come up in a minute.
  • 48:34 - 48:38
    I'm not sure if I -- it doesn't seem to be hyperlinking, but anyway,
  • 48:38 - 48:42
    maybe you can search for "Our generation does care" on YouTube.
  • 48:44 - 48:52
    OK, so, any further comments, coming up to the top of the hour?
  • 48:53 - 48:58
    Claire is saying you can click on the YouTube text and then it will work.
  • 48:58 - 49:01
    Oh yes, I see that's true, it does. OK, yes, gotcha.
  • 49:08 - 49:14
    Yes, it just an example: this is a teacher who's been interacting with us and -- well, with her students --
  • 49:14 - 49:18
    Oh, it came on in sound, I'm hearing it now.
  • 49:20 - 49:21
    Now I'll have to turn that off, somehow.
  • 49:22 - 49:23
    Are you hearing sound as well?
  • 49:27 - 49:36
    I'm getting inundated with audio, that I'm not -- unable to turn off, I'm not sure how it came on.
  • 49:37 - 49:38
    Oh, here it is.
  • 49:40 - 49:41
    Ah, I found it.
  • 49:43 - 49:46
    [some audio in background]
  • 49:46 - 49:51
    [Vance] Hem [laughs]. Oh well. Yeah, I found it, OK, there we go.
  • 49:55 - 49:59
    OK, it launched in a window and it was blaring in my ear,
  • 49:59 - 50:04
    and I was unable to find the window that launched to switch it off.
  • 50:06 - 50:18
    OK. So, what we do when the mic -- when people stop interacting, you're so welcome,
  • 50:18 - 50:23
    Lucia is saying thank you. Please you can please say thank you or say goodbye,
  • 50:23 - 50:29
    say your last remarks in the recording, so we can have that to end our recording with.
  • 50:29 - 50:33
    And this will all go into learning2gether.net,
  • 50:34 - 50:36
    and that's where we archive everything,
  • 50:36 - 50:41
    and we'll make an Elluminate recording, which you can have almost right away,
  • 50:41 - 50:44
    as soon as everybody leaves the room, that Elluminate recording gets made.
  • 50:44 - 50:51
    I'll post the link on Twitter, I'll post it to the #ltis13 hashtag, so you can find it there
  • 50:52 - 51:02
    and so please, if you want to say goodbye, you can do that now, and thank you very much for coming.
  • 51:02 - 51:05
    It's been really a nice session, I really enjoyed this.
  • 51:09 - 51:12
    [Lucia] OK, thank you, Vance, it was nice being here,
  • 51:12 - 51:17
    and it was very useful having to prepare everything for this event,
  • 51:17 - 51:26
    because it helped me clarify ideas and it added some value to what I was doing, to what I did.
  • 51:26 - 51:30
    So -- and it will be a pleasure to be able to go to your blog,
  • 51:30 - 51:37
    and then be able to listen again and think again about what everybody said.
  • 51:37 - 51:39
    So, thank you very much.
  • 51:42 - 51:46
    [Vance] OK, well, ciao to all our friends in Italy,
  • 51:47 - 51:53
    and thank you for coming, and I've just put the learning2gether.net website up, where--
  • 51:53 - 51:57
    you'll be able to go there and see the blog post of this event,
  • 51:57 - 52:04
    which will have the link to the Elluminate recording and also, will have an MP file that you can download.
  • 52:04 - 52:09
    So, as soon as everything goes quiet, I'll stop the recording
  • 52:09 - 52:15
    and when everybody leaves the room, then that recording will get put online
  • 52:15 - 52:17
    and I'll start processing it from there.
  • 52:17 - 52:24
    So thanks again: I really appreciate your -- and nice to meet you all, and ciao - bye bye.
Title:
Fabrizio Bartoli, Lucia Bartolotti organize a discussion of the cMOOC ltis13
Description:

Learning 2gether session, June 23, 2013. See http://learning2gether.net/2013/06/23/fabrizio-bartoli-lucia-bartolotti-organize-a-discussion-of-the-cmooc-ltis13/ for more info.

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