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Copy

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    So the answer is the third one. DNA RNA base pairing. Remember that Uracil
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    replaces Thymine in RNA, but that doesn't mean that Uracil from RNA can't base
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    pair with Adenine from DNA. Remember, the
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    ribose sugars are different. They're colored differently
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    in the RNA strand compared to the
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    DNA strand, but the letters, the nitrogenous bases,
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    can still pair with each other, right? So
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    here we have an RNA-DNA hybrid right now. Base
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    pairing is a powerful phenomenon, and as long as
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    you have these nitrogenous bases They want to form
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    these paired bonds with each other. So as
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    transcription occurs, a nucleotide after nucleotide is brought in
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    on the RNA side, it will keep being brought
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    in for the whole length of the gene until
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    transcription is complete, and you've reached the end. Now, when
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    I say the end, this isn't the end of the
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    chromosome. There actually is a distinct end to a gene,
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    and we'll talk a little bit more about that later.
Title:
Copy
Video Language:
English
Team:
Udacity
Project:
BIO110 - Tales from the Genome
Duration:
01:04
Cogi-Admin edited English subtitles for Copy

English subtitles

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