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What Is the Polar Vortex? - Best of the Blogs #12

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    Hello, and welcome to January
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    at the Scientific American blog network.
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    I'm Karen Bondar, and you know,
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    this month was kind of
    a wacky one for the network.
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    We are going all over the place,
    from extreme weather events
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    to extreme viral behavior,
    to the evolutionary psychology
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    behind the booming industry
    that is -- monster pornography.
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    I'm gonna throw it right over to
    John Horgan to explain that one first.
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    Monster porn;
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    this is written primarily by women,
    for women and it involves
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    fantasies of women having -- sex
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    often, at least initially,
    non-consensual sex
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    with -- bigfoot, with Godzilla, T-Rex,
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    giant robotic aliens -- I mean,
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    every possible crazy entitiy
    that you can imagine.
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    The angle I came up with was --
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    that not just the human mind in general,
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    but especially the female mind
    and the female libido
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    are completely mysterious.
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    I mean, because who could possibly
    predict something as crazy as --
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    monster porn?
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    This month on her blog, The Artful Amoeba,
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    Jennifer Frazer gets us a history
    about a virus that has managed to
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    successfully invade an animal host
    from a plant host.
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    This is mind boggling!
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    Tobacco ringspot virus
    normally causes trouble
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    in plants like soybean, raspberry,
    and of course, tobacco.
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    So it came as a shock
    when scientists discovered the virus
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    had apparently invaded honeybees.
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    Honeybees and plants are separated
    by 1.6 billion years of evolution.
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    So whose leap of that magnitude
    is mid boggling about.
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    The virus may have been added by
    a high mutation rate, and also,
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    by the fact that can be a
    sexually transmitted disease of plants.
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    Which means it can get around virus per packet we call polen
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    Since bees regularly wallow in the stuff -- the virus clearly
Title:
What Is the Polar Vortex? - Best of the Blogs #12
Description:

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Video Language:
English
Team:
Scientific American
Project:
Best of the Blogs
Duration:
04:11

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