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34C3 - Schnaps Hacking

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    34C3 preroll music
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    Herald (H): Let me introduce: It's Sir
    Wombat and Nero Lapislucis. So, give them
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    a warm welcome and everybody is interested
    in how to get the stuff done.
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    Nero (N):
    unaudible
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    We are going to present our juice press,
    which is this gorgeous instrument you can
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    see over there. And then we will talk
    about the fermentation vessel
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    you will need if you want to build one
    yourself. And we will explain shortly
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    again how you can create alcohol out of
    the yeast and the fruit juice. Afterwards
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    we will present the model of a still which
    you can see over there on the desk.
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    Sir Wombat (W): By model we mean it doesn't
    actually work, it only looks like it.
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    N: It's a kind of a hypothetical operation
    of a miniature still. Afterwards you will
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    get to know an alternative method of
    getting high percent alcohol, which is the
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    ice rifing. This is that. So, who are we?
    I'm Nero, I am kind of a professional
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    viking. Why am I presenting this talk? I
    was studying abroad in Norway and I was
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    too broke to buy the beer, so I had to
    find some solutions and I started making
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    the wine. And Sir Wombat over there is an
    electrical engineer and he's just trying
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    to build stuff since forever. Let's start
    with the juice press. I don't know - Do we
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    have the camera? Or are we doing it
    without?
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    Laughter
    W: I can just hold it up and maybe you see it.
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    N: So basically what we have is a wooden frame
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    and then there is a car jack attached to it.
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    With that we press this kind of
    wooden block down. And then we have on the
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    right hand side it's like this wood part
    which has a special shape so the juice can
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    run off. This is on the lower side. And
    there is the fruit between it. And with
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    the car jack you get lots of pressure.
    Actually if you boil the mash you can just
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    use the kitchen towel. But it's a lot of
    work. So this is actually kind of nice.
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    Inaudible question from the audience
    N: Yeah, you can do it with whole apples.
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    You can cut them beforehand: You can put
    them in the oven for a little while and it
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    makes it a lot easier. I don't know, I
    think it's easier if you kind of boil them
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    or put them in the oven beforehand and cut
    them. Then you get a little bit more juice.
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    Because what you see when you try
    this is that you have a lot of work.
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    And a lot of fruit for actually very little
    juice. Yeah, it's a lot of work
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    W: Inaudible
    N: The thing is that the fruit juice, what
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    is useful for the alcohol, it's basically
    just the sugar water. You can cheat which
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    is actually not allowed, but in theory you
    might cheat and add sugar to your fruit
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    juice, then the yeast has more kind of
    fruit and more basics to produce the
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    alcohol from. So you can add molasses to
    the fruit juice and that will increase the
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    alcohol outcome of your molasses. This is
    in basics the process you just heard
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    about. You have the sugar water and yeast.
    And the yeast is working in the sugar
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    water and by that creating alcohol and
    CO2. That's why you need the fermentation
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    vessel, which we will talk about in the
    next part. You can basically just use
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    normal yeast from the supermarket. You
    could also use some yeast cultures which
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    are on the fruits. There are also some
    kind of hippie wine producers which just
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    use the apples like they are and use the
    cultures which already are on them. But
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    it's better to use this specialized yeast,
    because you have optimal alcohol outcome
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    and lower risk that there are other
    bacteria evolving. What you don't want is
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    that there is oxygen coming into your
    fermentation process, because then what
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    you get isn't alcohol but vinegar. It just
    kind of tastes disgusting and it's not
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    what you make it for. That's why we are
    building the fermentation vessel. It's
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    basically just a mechanism to keep the air
    away. These are the ingredients you will
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    need to do. On the left hand side is my
    first experiment, on the right side is Sir
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    Wombat's. He has this special thing that
    he puts a pen in a kind of peanut butter
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    jar beforehand so the whole thing sticks
    better. You don't really need to do that
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    if your hose is kind of thick enough. I
    had this guzzling hose and it worked just
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    fine. You have to fix the hose in your
    fermentation vessel and in this kind of
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    jar which is filled with water. You can
    just use glue for that but it needs to be
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    airproof. What's happening is the CO2
    which comes from the fermentation process
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    can leave the vessel through the hose. So
    it just goes into the glass of water. The
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    effect is that no oxigen can come in and
    go the other way around. So it's really
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    simple. It's useful to have a fermentation
    starter. For that you start with
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    activating the dried yeast. The thing with
    that is, that you give the yeast, which
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    you want to have a good life in there, a
    head start ahead of all other bacterias or
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    kind of microbes which would want to
    evolve in there. It's not that important
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    that you keep the air out because you
    don't keep it for that long. What you do
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    is: You take the yeast you want, you put
    sugar in there and you put the molasses in
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    there. You just give it a head start with
    a lot of sugar and you keep it in there
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    for kind of about 12 hours. Then you put
    it in the fermentation vessel and add the
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    rest of the molasses. So it's not really
    in there for that long. Because of that
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    it's not that important to keep the air
    out. It doesn't have that much contact.
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    Here you can see the fermentation process.
    This is kind of a peanut butter jar and
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    there is the air and CO2 coming out. It
    looks like that when the fermentation is
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    running on high it can get a lot faster.
    But most of the time - It's also this nice
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    blubbing sound. If you keep it in your
    room - you will have a good night. How
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    will you know when your fermentation ends?
    Some of the yeast will die. You will
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    notice this at the bottom of the
    fermentation vessel. It will just float
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    down. You will also notice that the
    fermentation process is getting a lot
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    slower. Why does this happen? Either you
    have already too much alcohol for the
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    yeast to survive. This depends a bit on
    the kind of yeast you are using, but
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    mostly it's about 15% you can get. Or
    maybe there's just no sugar left. You
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    don't really want that to happen because
    then it doesn't really taste that good.
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    But basically it's also a possibility if
    you just want the alcohol. Just remember
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    that you shouldn't bottle it before it's
    totally finished because there's... As
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    long as there is still some fermentation
    going on, there is also CO2 coming out and
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    your bottle might explode. You don't want
    that. But if you continue with distilling
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    the whole thing it doesn't really matter
    because you work with it and you don't
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    bottle it. So what do we do now? We have
    the finished wine in the fermentation
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    vessel and you have the dead yeast on the
    ground. You should be careful when you
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    fill it in bottels or another vessel,
    because that yeast tastes kind of nasty.
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    So you should siphon it off. You can also
    pour it but then you should take a lot of
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    time and be very careful with it. Yes, to
    measure the alcohol content which will be
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    as said, explained before about 15% in the
    mash there's different tools. For the mash
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    we have the vinometer. If you want to
    measure it in the steel output you have
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    the hydrometer.This is when I give over to
    my friend. Yeah, sugar is a problem in
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    measuring actually because it confuses the
    instrument - both of them. So you should
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    consider this. And actually it's not
    really that fancy so you can get both of
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    them for like 10€. It's useful to have. We
    had that already. The results you get with
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    the fruit wine is normally between 6% and
    13%. 13 is already kind of high. If you
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    just use the process like I explained it,
    it's probably a bit less. So that's
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    actually why you would want to destill it
    afterwards. W: So we're talking about what
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    would happen if you'd want to build a
    still. We're not talking about an actual
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    still. We're talking about a model that
    looks like it could work, but doesn't.
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    Because as we said - we wouldn't break any
    rules, and Stefan said it's not allowed.
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    It's not legal to do so. The thing to
    build such a model - such a home sized
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    model, not an semi-professional one, you
    don't need all the... like 5000€ was the
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    cheaptest professional one we talked
    about. For such a tiny model you could get
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    away with 75€ if you're really resourceful
    like using an old pressure cooker from the
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    GDR. Those are finally the cheapest ones
    you find on eBay This size is like 10€ -
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    it's a nice thing. Some copper pipes you
    can get in your hardware store. The type
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    of copper pipe is used to connect fridges.
    Like for that fresh water and ice cube
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    feature fridges have.
    unaudible
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    The cooling system is just an old canister
    and some electronics I'll talk about
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    later. Let's just get back to the slides.
    Back to the slides please. Thanks.
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    The temperature sensing - we'll talk later
    about... And then that's it. So you just
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    connect the copper pipes like this in a
    T-form with a cork on top. And the screw
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    thing on the bottom to connect it to the
    lid of the pressure cooker. At that point
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    you use like an end cap for the copper
    pipe, drill a hole into it and connect the
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    thinner copper pipe to it. That will go
    onto the pressure cooker like this. Then
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    you need to do some soldering. Most of you
    probably know how to solder. This another
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    kind of soldering. It's the same thing -
    you use tin and copper and some flux to
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    make it flow easier. And not a soldering
    iron but a blow torch, but that's all the
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    difference there is. And then you just
    drill a hole into your cut open canister,
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    push it on there and use lots of glue to
    make it waterproof - It's no rocket
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    science. Then the temperature measurement
    we want to have that because in theory you
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    need a very precise measurement. In
    practice it didn't seem like we couldn't
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    live without it, but it's very interesting
    and it's helpful. How do we do that? Just
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    use on of those cheap integrated digital
    temperature sensors, a Raspberry Pi, a
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    real time clock to date the measurement
    protocol - that's just nice to have - and
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    a bit of python script. Mine is ugly, so
    it's not published, but everybody can do
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    it. It's like a day of work that will
    output a small website that shows the
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    current temperature graph. You can click
    on this link and download the current
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    temperature, like all the measurements as
    an Excel-file, and you can even download
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    former measurements. And that's why we
    need the realtime clock so that we don't
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    start a chaos. That's all there is. If you
    have WiFi that's nice because you can
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    leave the room well it's running. But
    yeah, you see something is not going well
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    and then you rush back. So you probably
    stay with it anyway. Now, this is how a
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    hypothetical run-through would look like.
    A tablet in the background, showing the
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    temperatures, the WiFi-router ...
    Laughter
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    It's a really great guy that he puts up
    with this. So yeah, you open the lid, you
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    put in your mash. Remember this is only a
    model. Then if your pressure cooker has a
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    broken locking-mechanism you use some
    chains and a screw to keep the lid closed.
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    It's not as critical as actual pressure
    cooker operation.
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    Laughter and applause
    Yeah. It's not as critical as actual
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    pressure cooker operation because there
    will be no pressure. If pressure builds up
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    you made some big mistake like plugging up
    the cooling pipe. If you thought the chain
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    was funny then come around and show the
    safety valve. it's like... yeah... as As I
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    said it's all cheap and made up. But it
    works. No, it doesn't.
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    Laughter
    It could work, so, as I said, you put mash
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    in, close the lid, turn on the gas stove.
    It's a gas stove because with no other
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    kind of stove you can regulate the power as fast - maybe with an induction heater - but
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    that doesn't work with a GDR pressure cooker. Then you started heating. At some
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    point evaporation will start, it will go up
    here, pass the thermometers so that we can
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    see the gas temperature. And then the gas
    will run in here in the cooler. And there
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    it hopefully condensates so that we don't
    blow up the operation. Yeah, we put some
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    great effort in into our non-functional
    model. We even painted it to look chalked. (Laughter)
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    There is another thermometer in here so
    that we see that the cooling system is as
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    cold as it's supposed to be.
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    And then if
    it would work the alcohol would drop out
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    here and run over the last temperature
    sensor so we can see
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    how warm it is.
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    Because if it gets too warm it will be
    vapor and that's bad.
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    And just for the fun of it there's an
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    additional temperature
    sensor on the connector board that's this
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    one here. Yeah. It's just to measure the
    room temperature.So, yeah, now we come to
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    a totally made up graph of an operation.
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    The red line is the gas temperature that
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    is always the most important one. Because
    at the current gas temperature, you can
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    see what, or you can at least guess, what
    chemical is currently running ...
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    evaporating.
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    The big plateau you can see
    at the top that is where the alcohol would
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    be, assuming that for a long time there
    would be alcohol coming out of the mash,
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    that turns into a plateau. The orange
    temperature is the air temperature. The
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    green line is what the output temperature
    would be. At the beginning it's something
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    like the room temperature. And then at the
    point where actual product starts dripping
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    out it cools down to the cooling water
    temperature and then running through it at
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    some point it will start separating because
    the cooling can't keep up because we don't
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    have a run-through cooler, we just have
    water in there, and that will start to
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    heat up. The ticks at the end, where the
    temperature suddenly drops, yeah, that
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    could be caused by having too high
    temperature and too much alcohol running
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    through the cooler. So then you'd turn
    down the heat a bit and it would start to
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    drop, and then you turn back up and it
    starts rising again. And at the end of a
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    run-through, when you open the lid again
    and the cold air comes there all the
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    temperatures drop again. And you're done
    with it. So as I said, it's all
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    hypothetical. And the hypothetical results
    could be something like ... Stop! There
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    was this methanol thing. So, with a still
    of this size, you won't get any dangerous
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    amounts of methanol. Yeah, we just...To be
    safe we drop the first 15 ml. We dispose
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    of them properly by burning them on the
    ground.
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    laughter
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    Then, what could the output look like?
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    If you would do this, it'd be a
    great idea to separate the output in 100
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    ml jars and measure each separately, so
    that you can follow what happens.
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    And it could be like the first jar would be maybe
    58%; maybe the 9th jar would be 35%,
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    because the higher the temperature gets
    the more water evaporates and so the
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    alcohol rate is lower.
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    Of those six
    glasses maybe the first six would be
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    usable, because the afterrun that has the
    stuff that evaporates at the higher
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    temperatures would taste bad. And if you
    wanted higher percentages, you could just
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    still it again and then you'd maybe get up
    to 78%. As Francisco already said, we
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    measure the output of the still - we would
    measure it - with the hydrometer.
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    And then 78% percent is nothing you ever drink, you
    only taste alcohol and nothing of the
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    fruit, so if you had a still output with
    78%, you would dilute it with water to
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    get it to 40.
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    Now, this is illegal, so we
    don't do it, but there is another method
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    which is kind of interesting. It basically
    uses the same principle, just it's not
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    separate boiling points, but separate
    freezing points. And then, to use this,
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    you put alcohol -maybe red wine - into a
    plastic bottle, put it into your freezer,
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    let it freeze through, and then you turn
    it around, and the first stuff that will
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    drop out is alcohol. Kind of an
    interesting picture is this here, because
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    we have liquid dropping down, which is so
    cold that the condensation on the other
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    vessel freezes. So, we know the liquid is
    something with a freezing point well below
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    the freezing point of water. If you
    measure this, you'll see that the output
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    has something between 20% or 40% when
    starting with a red wine of 10%, so it
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    really works. And I found it kind of
    interesting, because - except some crazy
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    guy in Bavaria -, I don't know of anybody
    actually using that. And that guy uses it
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    to the create world's strongest beer with
    like 58% and it's still legally beer
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    because of German laws.
    Laughter
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    Here we see... That's the stuff that
    stayed in the bottle, after it unfroze.
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    And that's the stuff that dripped out
    below, so if you put a light behind it,
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    you see that's the one side is much
    darker, so apparently the pigment is
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    soluble in alcohol. It's just an
    interesting fact we saw, too. Well, that's
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    what we did. So in conclusion, it's
    totally possible to build a non-functional
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    model of a still with hardware-store
    parts. Running this... risks exist, but
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    are manageable. Watch out for proper
    cooling; with such a cooler, it's just...
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    make sure that there is water in it before
    you start it. Methanol poisoning can be
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    prevented by using a clean mash like mash
    you'd drink unstilled. And discarding the
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    first 15 ml. And if you had something like
    this and say you tried to still whisky,
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    you should look out for foaming, because
    if you try to run it too fast, maybe the
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    mash would foam up and clog your still and
    it'd be bad. So yeah, don't do that. In
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    conclusion, it's great fun...
    theoretically.
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    Laughter
    And yes, do not do this. It's illegal.
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    Thank you.
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    Applause
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    H: What a fabulous, practical
    introduction. So we have now five minutes
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    for Q and A... Everybody who wants to ask
    a question please go to the microphones,
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    and please stay in the room for this five
    minutes. If there are any... Keep in mind,
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    this time everybody has to go out on this
    side. So is there any question in the
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    room? Microphone 1 please.
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    Mic1: Yes, thank you for the talk. Thank
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    you for the ideas. Do you know how the
    legal aspects are in Switzerland?
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    Restrained laughter
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    Stefan (S): In Switzerland you guys are
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    actually quite well off, because you are
    allowed to have small stills until the
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    capacity of 5 litres. We have until the
    end of the 2070ies that 0.5 l, which is
  • 26:18 - 26:24
    basically useless. You can try it once,
    but for each run you get maybe a shot of
  • 26:24 - 26:31
    usable liquor. In Switzerland, you have 5
    l and then you get at least some... yeah,
  • 26:31 - 26:36
    200 ml of usable spirits, and this is
    actually fun to tinker with. This is
  • 26:36 - 26:41
    something you and your fellows can, well,
    have a decent evening.
  • 26:41 - 26:45
    H: Microphone 5.
    Mic5: Yeah, so... When I saw the
  • 26:45 - 26:50
    electronics, that's usually not so safe to
    drink from lead and everything. So, do you
  • 26:50 - 26:56
    have any tips for how to solder, so it's
    safe for drinking?
  • 26:56 - 27:05
    W: Yeah, I forgot to mention it, we used
    lead free solder. That's a really great
  • 27:05 - 27:13
    comment of you. And I looked it up and
    solder, you can find it in the hardware
  • 27:13 - 27:19
    store next to the copper tubes that is
    lead-free. But check that to be sure.
  • 27:19 - 27:23
    You don't want lead into your spirits.
  • 27:23 - 27:24
    H: Microphone 1.
  • 27:24 - 27:31
    Mic1: Would you do the cooling per air
    flow instead of water?
  • 27:31 - 27:39
    W: I've seen online some people who did
    that with a construction that looked kind
  • 27:39 - 27:46
    of like a CPU cooler attached to something
    which had the vaporized alcohol run
  • 27:46 - 27:57
    through it. I mean, it'd be illegal to
    try, so I haven't and... But this guy
  • 27:57 - 28:04
    apparently has and it worked for him, so..
    Yeah. But I don't know how you'd
  • 28:04 - 28:10
    construct the copper block which you
    attach to the CPU cooler, so there's that.
  • 28:10 - 28:17
    S: I've seen silver etchings in really,
    really old manuscripts that were using
  • 28:17 - 28:23
    just air to cool down, but... well, that's
    technology 500 years ago that says "Yeah,
  • 28:23 - 28:26
    use water."
  • 28:26 - 28:27
    H: Microphone 5.
  • 28:27 - 28:38
    Mic5: You showed the glass part still and
    you said this could not be purchased after
  • 28:38 - 28:44
    the 1st of January, right? But if you just
    purchase the single parts, because it's
  • 28:44 - 28:48
    standard lab equipment, is this also
    illegal?
  • 28:48 - 28:53
    S: Yes, I mean, you don't purchase a still
    per se, do you?
  • 28:53 - 28:56
    Mic5: Exactly, it's standard glass...
    S: I don't think this is gonna be a
  • 28:56 - 29:01
    problem, but, you know there's laboratory
    equipments and they sell you a still made
  • 29:01 - 29:09
    from glass for training distillation...
    And this costs some 250 euros and they
  • 29:09 - 29:15
    sell you the same exact part this still is
    made of for cheaper. So basically, order 3
  • 29:15 - 29:20
    or times...3 or 4 times different
    equipment parts, maybe from different...
  • 29:20 - 29:25
    And...I mean, this is ridiculous. Really,
    it is.
  • 29:25 - 29:27
    Mic5: Thanks.
  • 29:27 - 29:28
    H: Okay, Mikrophone 1.
  • 29:28 - 29:33
    Mic1: Yeah, hi. Thank you for your
    theoretical explanation. I have one
  • 29:33 - 29:36
    question but first I just wanted to
    mention, that you can build all this
  • 29:36 - 29:42
    without programming. You can buy a
    physical thing to measure the temperature,
  • 29:42 - 29:47
    so if anybody is afraid because of that
    part. And than yeah, my question is there
  • 29:47 - 29:53
    a reason why you don't use or just
    mentioned, turbo yeast, stuff like
  • 29:53 - 29:59
    that where you can reach 20 percents in
    two days. Is it not that tasty or stuff?
  • 29:59 - 30:05
    N: Yeah, I think actually we just used the
    first one, we got hands on, didn't we?
  • 30:05 - 30:10
    For the first experiments. I mean, you could
    try it but then you always have, it has
  • 30:10 - 30:14
    negative parts, so... maybe it's the
    taste, maybe it's something else.
  • 30:14 - 30:20
    But I mean, I wouldn't claim that you
    achieve high quality taste with
  • 30:20 - 30:22
    what we just showed.
  • 30:22 - 30:25
    S: I can answer one part for the
  • 30:25 - 30:30
    "Abfindungsbrennerei", you could use turbo
    yeast, but turbo yeast is something...
  • 30:30 - 30:35
    I'm not really sure about the translation. It
    is called "Hefenährsalze" which is salts,
  • 30:35 - 30:39
    that you need, to actually have an
    environment for this turbo yeast. And these
  • 30:39 - 30:43
    "Hefenährsalze" are unfortunely not
    allowed in "Abfindungsbrennerei".
  • 30:43 - 30:48
    So usally you don't...you don't use turbo
    yeast and you don't actually need it for
  • 30:48 - 30:52
    fruit spirits. It's okay, if you want to
    make grain spirits but you know the higher
  • 30:52 - 30:59
    the yeast ferments the less taste and
    scent remains in the destillate.
  • 30:59 - 31:03
    So we won't have taste otherwise we could just
    buy vodka in the store.
  • 31:03 - 31:10
    H: Okay, Mikrophone 5, please.
    Mic5: Thanks again for your talk.
  • 31:10 - 31:16
    Regarding the cooling. Is it necessary to
    cool it with room temperature water or why
  • 31:16 - 31:23
    not chuck in some ice cubes or crushed ice
    to keep the temperature lower or hinder
  • 31:23 - 31:26
    the rising of the temperature in the
    cooling vessel?
  • 31:26 - 31:32
    W: Well let's say we had run this
    hypothetical operation in our minds
  • 31:32 - 31:38
    multiple times. Maybe the first time we
    had tried it with ice cubes and then
  • 31:38 - 31:47
    started exchanging the water. Maybe we had
    a few times thought about running it and
  • 31:47 - 31:53
    using just tap water and exchanging the
    tap water multiple times. And then maybe
  • 31:53 - 31:59
    in our minds one time we forgot to change
    the water and it still would have worked,
  • 31:59 - 32:08
    so we made up all further operations just
    with a bucket of water and not changing
  • 32:08 - 32:13
    it, so yeah. Point is, that's the easiest
    way and it works.
  • 32:13 - 32:18
    M5: Excellent.
    H: And I saw there is some question from
  • 32:18 - 32:21
    the internet.
    Signal angel: Exactly. The internet wants
  • 32:21 - 32:30
    to know if there is a limit or a legal
    limit to the freeze destilation of the ice
  • 32:30 - 32:35
    rifing process?
    W: I tried to look it up, but I didn't
  • 32:35 - 32:44
    find anything about it. So, maybe there is
    a thing that if you...
  • 32:44 - 32:50
    Let's just stay with the beer guy from
    Bavaria. The customs actually have a page
  • 32:50 - 32:59
    about producing beer at home. You can do
    that legally in Germany and the first 100
  • 32:59 - 33:05
    liters are tax free, so you can just do
    that. So, yeah, then you have 100 liters
  • 33:05 - 33:10
    of beer and you start concentrating them
    and when you are done with that it gets
  • 33:10 - 33:17
    complicated. So, I guess that's the limit.
    And then that guy probably just taxes the
  • 33:17 - 33:22
    further beer and that's how he does it.
    N: But then you don't have to register
  • 33:22 - 33:26
    your freezer at the tax office so maybe
    people won't be that eager to check.
  • 33:26 - 33:31
    H: Ok then the last two questions,
    Microphone 1.
  • 33:31 - 33:37
    Mic1: Okay, so my question is about the
    freezing method as well. What is about the
  • 33:37 - 33:42
    methanol for the freezing method. Is there
    some way to get rid of this, or is it
  • 33:42 - 33:48
    really unnecessary?
    W: Well, as I said the stuff in the
  • 33:48 - 33:54
    pictures was red wine from Aldi because
    you don't experiment with expensive stuff.
  • 33:54 - 34:04
    And if I drink a whole bottle of Aldi red
    wine, nothing bad happens to me. So I
  • 34:04 - 34:08
    guess if I take any part of a bottle of
    red wine from Aldi, nothing bad will
  • 34:08 - 34:10
    happen, too. So there's that.
  • 34:10 - 34:15
    Mic1: So there shouldn't be
    methanol in the orginal stuff.
  • 34:15 - 34:21
    A: There probably will be but less
    enough so that it's not a problem.
  • 34:21 - 34:22

    H: Okay.
  • 34:22 - 34:28
    S:The thing about the methanol is, if I'm
    allowed to add, methanol comes from the
  • 34:28 - 34:33
    pectines. Pectines are basically the
    building substance of the cells.
  • 34:33 - 34:39
    But if you have juice or wine we already pressed
    it down and the pectins stay in the stuff
  • 34:39 - 34:46
    we throw away and so in the juice and in
    the wine that we cool down so there is
  • 34:46 - 34:51
    very little methanol in it. That is
    different if we make a mash and have all
  • 34:51 - 34:56
    the cell residue still in the mash, then
    we have the methanol in this mash.
  • 34:56 - 34:59
    And so we have it in the destillate.
  • 34:59 - 35:02
    H: Okay, the last question,
    microphone one please.
  • 35:02 - 35:09
    Mic1: Hi. Thanks for a great talk. My questions
    are around the head, hearts and tail,
  • 35:09 - 35:13
    the hacked distilling method that,
    I gather, you pretty much did
  • 35:13 - 35:17
    what you took for second
    third, fourth part of it, and you divided
  • 35:17 - 35:24
    it up like that. But in the craft
    distillery, how do you do to use it, but
  • 35:24 - 35:29
    controlling the temperature of the
    evaporation and the stilling liquid, or
  • 35:29 - 35:34
    do you also do it by breaking into segments?
    What's the technique you used to separate?
  • 35:34 - 35:37

    S: There's actually many roads that lead
  • 35:37 - 35:42
    to Rome. So you could basically use this
    fractioning method that there was
  • 35:42 - 35:47
    described here that you just take one liter and
    one liter and one liter and then you check it
  • 35:47 - 35:53
    by smelling and tasting, if it's okay, or
    if it's not. And then the other way is,
  • 35:53 - 35:59
    for example, temperature control. So if
    you buy a modern still from an experienced
  • 35:59 - 36:04
    copper smith, this is made with any types
    of sensors and that are telling you the
  • 36:04 - 36:08
    temperatures, the flow, the alcohol
    content. So you can basically program your
  • 36:08 - 36:14
    still to automatically cut the foreshots
    and the aftershots. So this is another
  • 36:14 - 36:20
    way. Then you could, for example, distill
    once or twice, and with the first
  • 36:20 - 36:24
    distillation, just take every alcohol
    that's coming out and then collect this
  • 36:24 - 36:29
    first run, and then redistill it, and then
    make your cuts for the heads and the
  • 36:29 - 36:33
    tails. And you can make it otherwise it
    can cut the head and tails in the first
  • 36:33 - 36:40
    run, and then just basically concentrate
    in the redistillation. So there's many
  • 36:40 - 36:44
    roads that lead to Rome and you're just
    gonna find out your way that suits you
  • 36:44 - 36:52
    best. But if you start, I would take the
    fracturing, the fracturing method. Yes.
  • 36:52 - 36:57
    Mic1: What was your run, your still on?
    What technique did you use for your
  • 36:57 - 37:01
    business, your still?
  • 37:01 - 37:05
    S: You mean my still at home?
    The craft still that I get on the...?
  • 37:05 - 37:07
    Yeah, this is experience.
  • 37:07 - 37:10
    So we know the first 1.5 liters
    is foreshots,
  • 37:10 - 37:15
    so we collect those and then we
    redistill them again. But. Yeah.
  • 37:15 - 37:21
    At some time my great-grandfather, most
    probably found out the way and he taught them
  • 37:21 - 37:26
    his son and his son. And I know that I
    didn't need to get rid of 1.5l of foreshots.
  • 37:26 - 37:29
    Mic1: Thank you.
    S: You are welcome.
  • 37:29 - 37:33
    H: Then at the end of
    this double feature, I expect a very big
  • 37:33 - 37:42
    warm applause for Franziska, Andreas,
    and Stefan
  • 37:42 - 37:46
    Applause
  • 37:46 - 38:11
    subtitles created by c3subtitles.de
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Title:
34C3 - Schnaps Hacking
Description:

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Video Language:
English
Duration:
38:11

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