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    ♪ (music) ♪
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    (Tom) This is an exciting time for us
    here in British Columbia,
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    from an assessment, curriculum,
    and instructional perspective.
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    (Suzanne) There has been an evolution
    around assessment practices.
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    and the redesigned, renewed curriculum
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    gives that opportunity for us
    to do it very differently.
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    (Jacob) We want students
    who are engaged learners
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    and we want students who are going
    to be life-long learners.
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    (Joy) We have the opportunity
    to shift our assessment practice.
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    (Jo-Anne) Really looking at the power
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    of formative assessment
    and authentic assessment.
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    (Leyton) Co-owned by the teachers,
    co-owned by the learners.
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    (Nancy) A cooperative team effort
    between the teacher and the student.
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    (Joy) Because teacher learning
    and student learning go hand-in-hand
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    (Suzanne) it enables students
    to take ownership of their learning.
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    (Tom) Over the last number of years,
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    BC teachers have worked in collaboration
    with the Ministry of Education
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    to bring about a shift
    in our curricular focus.
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    ♪ (music) ♪
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    One of the overarching questions
    we have to consider
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    as this shift happens in British Columbia
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    is what importance
    does our assessment literacy play?
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    We have been a very assessment literate
    jurisdiction for a number of years
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    but with the shift in focus
    into the core competencies
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    it requires a renewed focus
    and renewed interest
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    in how assessment practices
    build proficiency
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    and allow students to grow
    in their understanding.
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    What they know, what they can do
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    and how they can demonstrate their
    abilities to think critically,
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    to think creatively,
    to collaborate, to communicate.
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    (students talking)
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    The context of assessment literacy
    within a school district,
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    to me, is of paramount importance.
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    And I think it starts with having
    a very clearly articulated vision
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    around why you need assessment literacy.
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    And there needs to be a culture
    within a school district
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    that is open and receptive to working
    on that model of continuous improvement.
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    And, if we have that consistent understanding
    and a deep understanding as a system,
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    there's a multiplication effect
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    in terms of how we're able
    to support students and student learning.
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    So I think it's vital
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    that we have common understandings
    of what strong assessment practices are.
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    Assessment literacy is deeply relational.
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    You can't engage in assessment
    without having a relationship
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    with the individuals or the group
    that you're learning with or supporting.
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    Assessment literacy is relevant to me
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    because to the extent to which
    we understand how assessment works,
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    it has a huge impact
    on what happens in the classroom
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    and what happens with teachers day-to-day
    and how they interact with their students.
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    Reading, what they did really well,
    [and] what you noticed.
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    I am very much in favor
    of a common language for assessment.
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    And that we build upon
    the assessment literacy
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    that we have already in the province.
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    There's a very strong connection
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    between curriculum, instruction,
    assessment, [and] reporting.
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    Curriculum assessment instruction
    is different than what it was before
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    because of the curriculum redesign.
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    You can't have one effectively take place
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    without the others happening
    at the same time.
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    And the redesigned,
    renewed curriculum
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    gives that opportunity for us
    to do it very differently.
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    So before where, really,
    as a teacher in a classroom
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    I would look at what kids understood
    and that was all I would take a look at.
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    But now it's about that knowing,
    that doing, that understanding
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    and there is leadership within classrooms,
    there's leadership within schools,
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    there's leadership within the district
    that can really enable that to be so.
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    What we're talking about is a shift
    in the means and ends.
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    The core competencies
    have always been a part of instruction
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    but they were a means to an end.
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    A number of decades ago,
    we had kids collaborate.
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    We had kids think critically.
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    But the goal, ultimately, was
    to acquire content proficiency.
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    Now this shift really has us thinking
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    about the means
    and the ends moving places.
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    So we're no longer using competencies
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    to acquire content acquisition
    or content knowledge
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    but we're using knowledge
    to develop competencies.
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    And, so the understanding and the knowing
    and the doing within the content areas
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    will allow us to, as an end result,
    teach kids how to think more critically,
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    how to collaborate, how to be creative
    in their thinking as well.
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    There are a number of connections
    between the revised curriculum
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    and really looking at the power
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    of formative assessment
    and authentic assessment.
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    Assessment is really
    more a verb than a noun.
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    And so often, traditionally,
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    we viewed assessment as a kind
    of event that's occurred.
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    That we press pause on teaching
    and then we assess,
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    and then we get back to teaching.
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    Where, if teachers can see
    assessment as more of a verb,
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    in that we use assessment for action
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    and that allows us to be more agile
    in our instructional approach.
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    So assessment and instruction
    are just an ongoing cycle
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    or we'd say it's iterative.
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    You're constantly saying:
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    "Where are we? How do I know this?"
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    And then: "How does this inform
    where I'm going next?"
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    We don't want to just put it out there
    and hope for the best.
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    We use the assessment that we design
    to ensure that students
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    are actually getting the knowledge
    that we wanted them to gain,
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    developing the understanding
    and developing the abilities
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    to do what it is that we had hoped
    they would be able to do.
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    How are we evolving?
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    British Columbia is known as a leader
    in formative assessment around the world.
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    I think there has been an evolution
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    around assessment practices
    in school districts.
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    And, everybody is on a journey and we're all
    at different places on that continuum.
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    Our classrooms and our students
    are very different
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    to what they were historically,
    much more complex, much more diverse.
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    And in order to pitch the ball
    where all kids can hit it,
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    we have to come up with new ways
    of knowing and doing things differently
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    with respect to assessment.
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    In my classroom I found
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    that the vast majority
    of assessment is formative.
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    And there's very little
    that's done in my classroom
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    that isn't an opportunity
    for formative assessment.
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    Student learning does not have to look
    the exact same for every single student.
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    Doesn't have to look the same,
    doesn't have to sound the same.
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    Just as learning processes don't have
    to look the same and sound the same
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    for every single student.
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    So I think the revised curriculum
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    has opened up the door
    for looking at differentiated assessment
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    and ensuring that we
    are finding the access points
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    for all students in our schools.
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    We co-construct our assessments,
    our assessment practices,
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    with each other and with our students
    based on what's important.
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    And that draws from the curriculum
    that we work with
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    but more importantly
    it's situated and co-owned.
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    Co-owned by the teachers,
    co-owned by the learners.
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    We're working with criteria always
    that's co-created with the students.
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    A big part of that is how teachers
    use time in classrooms.
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    I think back to when I taught.
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    I spent a lot of time
    on summative assessment.
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    Preparing kids for tests.
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    And now it's that ongoing,
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    minute-by-minute, hour-by-hour,
    day-by-day feedback
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    that teachers are able to provide
    for students around their learning
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    that is in formative assessments.
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    We have the opportunity
    to shift our assessment practice
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    in the sense that it is infused
    in this learning cycle.
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    And ultimately what we want,
    we are aiming for life-long learners.
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    And if we don't develop
    that capacity of students
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    to be able to assess themselves
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    and have a sense of how they're doing
    and how they're growing
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    then they leave our system
    dependent on others to tell them
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    whether they can do something or not
    or what the next steps are.
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    We know that it's important for students
    to take ownership over their own learning
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    because there is a good body
    of evidence in the research
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    that tells us that as students
    take more ownership over their learning
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    and are more invested in their learning
    continuum all along the way,
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    that there's increased motivation,
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    there's increased engagement,
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    there's increased understanding
    of where they are in and of themselves.
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    A professional question of my own
    through my whole teaching career
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    is how am I facilitating their learning
    so they have ownership.
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    We have to help students value whatever
    learning processes they're engaged in.
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    And they will value it if they own it,
    if they see it as theirs.
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    But in order for them
    to take ownership of their learning
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    there has to be quite a relationship
    of trust and good feeling
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    between the teacher and the student.
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    And I can't imagine, now, a classroom
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    where it's not a cooperative team effort
    between the teacher and the student.
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    Student ownership is about helping them
    develop that sense of self-advocacy.
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    That they can learn. That they can learn
    in different environments.
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    That they can transfer the learning
    to different contexts.
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    And will continue beyond
    a specific learning experience,
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    specific classroom, or the K-12 system.
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    I think the best way for us to build
    assessment literacy across our system
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    is to think of assessment
    as relationship building,
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    as a way to drive inclusivity,
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    as a focus on how we nurture
    a culture of learning
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    and an environment
    where students feel supported,
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    they feel motivated,
    and they feel engaged.
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    Do students see assessment
    as an opportunity or as an inhibitor?
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    Or do they see assessment
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    as being an opportunity for them
    to know where they are,
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    what it takes for them to grow
    in their proficiency?
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    If students see you as a learner alongside
    them, I think that is the key piece.
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    So that's good for me
    to reflect on that, too.
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    Thank you so much. One more.
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    When we've developed this culture
    in the class that is around growth,
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    that this is my learning, right now,
    but I know I'm continuing to learn.
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    I really believe that it's this assessment
    literacy that enables that to happen.
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    We know at the end of the day,
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    that school completion
    is of paramount importance
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    for student success
    beyond the K-12 system.
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    So it behooves us to do
    whatever it takes to make that so.
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    And personally I see formative assessment,
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    the work that teachers
    are doing in classrooms,
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    the work that principals
    are doing with teachers,
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    the work that
    system leaders are doing
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    to put systems and structures
    in place to make that so
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    is of paramount importance
    for the future of society as a whole.
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    Investing in our assessment literacy
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    is arguably the most efficient
    and effective professional investment
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    any teacher can make
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    because assessment sits at the center
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    of so many of our
    experiences in the school.
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    Our assessment literacy matters
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    because it's the way in which we measure
    how students are succeeding,
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    how we provide feedback
    on how they can grow their proficiency
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    and begin to let other people know
    about the development of those children
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    and how they're beginning
    to think differently
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    here in the 21st century.
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    (Suzanne) And the redesigned,
    renewed curriculum
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    gives that opportunity for us
    to do it very differently.
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    (Tom) This shift really has us thinking
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    we have a great opportunity to create
    a re-think in our whole assessment system.
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    (Suzanne) It starts with having
    a very clearly articulated vision.
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    (Jacob) Recognize that we all
    bring something.
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    (Nancy) Build upon the assessment literacy
    that we have already in the province.
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    (Tom) Create a renewed interest
    in assessment systems
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    that really do put students
    at the center of the experience.
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    (Jo-Anne) They will value it if they own it,
    if they see it as theirs.
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    (Tom) Our students future success
    depends on our ability
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    to grow and refine
    our assessment practices.
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    (Joy) Because teacher learning,
    student learning go hand-in-hand.
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    (hand slapping)
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    (Tom) We use assessment for action.
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    (Suzanne) Open and receptive to working on
    that model of continuous improvement.
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    (Leyton) Where are we? How do I know this? And then
    how does this inform where I'm going next?
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    (Nancy) Let's respect ourselves and each other
    and get some learning done.
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    ♪ (music) ♪
Title:
vimeo.com/.../273039648
Video Language:
English
Team:
On Demand - 903
Project:
BATCH 1 (7.3.18)
Duration:
11:43

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