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The Ethics of Looking And The "Harmless" Peeping Tom

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    It’s often said that cinema,
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    by it's very nature, is voyeuristic,
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    because film offers the audience a window
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    into the hidden lives of others.
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    Watching people’s stories on the big
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    and small screen can indeed be
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    fascinating and exhilarating.
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    But the act of looking can also feel
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    uncomfortable, invasive, even violating.
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    Underpinning these uncomfortable moments
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    we can find some alarming messages
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    about the role of consent.
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    To explain, let’s start here
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    in the normal bedroom of a normal boy
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    doing normal boy stuff.
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    Normal stuff
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    like spying on the girl next door.
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    Popular culture is filled
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    with scenes like this one
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    Scenes in which one character,
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    usually a man
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    spies on another character,
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    usually a woman
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    without that person’s knowledge or consent
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    To be clear, we're talking about secret
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    surveillance of a person
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    while they're alone
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    in various states of undress
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    or engaged in sexual activity.
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    This is invasive looking
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    that violates a person's
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    reasonable expectation of privacy.
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    In a staggering number of movies
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    and tv shows, this type of spying
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    isn't done by the villain.
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    It is instead perpetrated
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    by "nice guy" characters.
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    "Slow down, baby"
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    These are straight men, who are otherwise
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    presented as decent.
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    Or, at the very least,
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    mostly harmless.
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    "Hey! Hey!"
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    This media patern is so prevasive,
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    I thought it needed a name.
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    "He's a peeping Tom!"
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    So I call it "The harmless peeping Tom".
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    "You know, it occurs to me,
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    that you can see right into Donna's house
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    from my driveway."
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    "You don't say"
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    (off-screen laughter)
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    All of the boys on "That 70s Show"
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    for instance, casually participate
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    in spying behavior.
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    "No, Anette! Not the robe!"
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    (off-screen laughter)
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    "Quick, somebody yell
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    'pillow fight' in a girl voice"
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    But the character of Fez
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    is the quintessential example
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    of a harmless peeping Tom.
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    (off-screen laughter)
    - "Oh my god, Fez!"
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    "Nice honkers!"
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    (off-screen laughter)
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    "Get out of here!"
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    "Fez?"
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    There's a years long running gag
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    about how he's always spying on women.
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    Often hiding in their bedroom closets.
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    "Oh my god, did you see anything?"
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    "Not much, you should really think
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    about a nightlight."
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    And yet this pattern of intrusive behavior
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    is just considered a minor
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    nuisance on the show.
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    "Ouch"
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    "You okay?"
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    (camera click)
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    "Fez!"
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    (off-screen laughter)
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    "With this, you can see
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    through a lady's clothes"
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    (off-screen laughter)
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    "Okay, Jackie, prepare to be ogled"
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    Fez even ends up
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    in a romantic relationship
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    with one of the women
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    he's spied on.
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    Over 8 seasons of prime time television.
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    Scenes in which boys secretly spy on girls
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    were a staple of so called
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    "teen sex comedies".
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    In the late 1970s and early 80s.
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    But the media pattern didn't begin or end
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    with Animal House, Porky's
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    or Revenge of the Nerds.
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    "Oh! Yeah!"
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    Alfred Hitchcock was famously obsessed
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    with voyeurism.
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    And included peeping scenes
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    in several of his most notable films.
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    Since then, we've seen
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    Harmless Peeping Toms pop up
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    in practically every genre.
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    From action movies to horror films.
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    From romantic dramas
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    to science fiction adventures.
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    And it's not uncommon for video games
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    to present players with interactive
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    peeping opportunities.
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    "Look at this, come here"
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    "There's a naked woman across the street"
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    "Where?"
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    "Second floor from the top
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    see the window on the left"
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    "Wow"
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    The trope has also been a mainstay
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    on TV sitcoms.
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    "Oh my God, that's Rachel naked!"
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    Usually as a one-off gag
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    in a handful of episodes.
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    "Would you have opened the door
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    if you knew it was me?"
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    "Not since I found out
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    the teddy bear you gave me
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    had a webcam in it!"
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    While we may typically think
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    of peeping Toms as a stranger
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    hiding in the bushes,
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    spying can take many different forms.
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    "Did I miss anything?"
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    "Oh my God"
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    "Oh!"
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    "Oh, thank you, God, for this wonderful,
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    wonderful day"
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    Occasionally, spying is presented
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    as a part of man's job.
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    Like a cop on a stakeout.
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    "Oh, wow, oh yeah"
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    But in many of those scenarios,
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    the Harmless Peeping Tom trope
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    still applies.
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    "To protect and to serve"
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    "Ooh, ooh, ohh, I love my job so much, oh"
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    In espionage themed media,
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    the guy might have access
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    to high-tech spying gadgets.
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    "Nine different enhanced visions modes
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    every little boy's dream:
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    the penetrating mode"
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    "And would you look at that"
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    In superhero stories
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    or supernatural plot lines
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    the guy's powers may be used
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    as a way to gain access
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    to a woman's body.
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    (woman screams)
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    "And He saw, that it was good"
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    Superman, for example
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    is often upheld as a paragon of good
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    decent manhood
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    and yet even he steals a quick peek
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    from time to time.
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    Harmless Peeping Toms
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    aren't always the hero.
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    But, they're not the villain either.
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    "I wind up seeing a lot more of Ava
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    than I bargained for"
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    Even if the protagonist has, let's say
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    questionable morals
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    or is involved
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    in other criminal activities
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    the spying itself isn't framed as a strike
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    against his character.
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    And critically
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    the audience is still meant
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    to indentify with HIM as he's peeping.
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    "What?"
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    It's not unusual
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    for invasions of privacy
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    to be framed as endearing.
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    "Excuse me?"
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    "Oh!"
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    "I think you're in my bath..."
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    "Close your eyes!"
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    or just the innocuous behavior
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    of a guy with a crush.
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    Even when peeping is called out
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    as pathetic, annoying or a little creepy
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    "It was an accident."
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    "You're an asshole!"
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    his actions are, more often than not,
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    quickly forgiven and forgotten.
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    A good way to illustrate the deeper
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    problem here can be found in the
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    "no peeking" plot cliché.
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    "How did you see it?
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    You said you wouldn't look!"
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    "Sorry, as I told you the hero
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    always peeks."
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    The set up is a familar one: a woman
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    needs to change clothes for some reason.
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    But her guy friend is standing right there
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    "You're not bothering me."
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    So naturally she asks him to turn around
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    or close his eyes while she undresses.
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    "Would you please turn around?"
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    "Why?"
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    "Just turn around."
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    "Just look,
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    look over there for a second."
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    "Yeah."
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    "Just turn around and look at the
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    waterfalls Skippy all right, please?"
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    "Fine."
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    "Stay in guard, no peeking."
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    Does our protagonist respects her wishes?
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    Of course not.
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    "Don't look!"
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    "I said your eyes have to go over there!"
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    Most of the time, he peeks anyway
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    "Turn around!"
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    "Now!"
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    "Turn around."
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    and there are rarely any consequences
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    for violating her trust.
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    In fact his trangression
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    is likely to be rewarded.
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    Now sometimes the women character will
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    explicitely ask not to be looked at,
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    while in other examples it's just implied
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    that the guy shouldn't be staring.
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    It's incredibly rare to see a man who,
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    given the opportunity, doesn't peek.
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    "Don't look."
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    "Okay."
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    If it’s a romantic story, the transgression is
    often presented as a sign that he’s attracted to her.
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    In reality though,
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    if a man demonstrates a deliberate disregard for consent or women’s boundaries
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    that should be a major major red flag.
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    "Drop dead, dirtbag."
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    Even though Invasive spying is often considered
    just a nuisance crime by law enforcement,
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    being spied-on isn’t a minor inconvenience for the victims
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    "Hello"
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    it can cause real lasting emotional harm.
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    "Someone there?"
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    "That's it, I can almost see it."
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    Sometimes peeping scenes are
    filmed in a family-friendly way
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    "There she is."
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    while in other media it can be much more explicit.
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    In fact throughout this video essay
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    I’ve had to use a lot of creative editing techniques
    and strategic blurring
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    just to make the footage appropriate for YouTube.
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    "Oh, you imp. You've got nudity in there!"
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    Despite what some conservative groups
    would have you believe,
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    the problem here is not the depiction
    of sex or nudity on-screen.
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    Depending on how it’s framed, sex and nudity can be represented in all kinds of ways.
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    "Should be fine."
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    The real issues with the
    “Harmless” Peeping Tom trope
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    stems from the lack of consent
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    between the characters in the story
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    and how those violations
    are framed as “no big deal.”
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    "Did you see me change
    out of my clothes by the Jacuzzi?"
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    "I thought that you were catatonic."
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    There’s a common misconception that voyeurism is,
    by definition, looking without permission.
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    But that is not true.
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    Voyeurism can, and I’d argue should, be a consensual act.
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    It is, of course, possible to film scenes,
    even voyeuristic ones,
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    where characters look at each other
    in consensual ways.
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    "Steve..."
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    But cinematic depictions of consensual gazing
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    are not anywhere near as prevalent as scenes
    where permission has not been granted.
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    Up until this point, we’ve been discussing
    the perspective of characters on-scene
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    but there’s another critical perspective
    we haven’t yet considered.
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    And that is the perspective of the camera.
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    Let’s return for a moment to that
    “normal” boys bedroom from earlier.
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    Although, it’s not a “normal” bedroom, is it?
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    It’s really a movie set.
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    And that’s not really a “normal” boy either,
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    that’s an actor working from a script.
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    In fact, everything we see here is
    a deliberate choice by the filmmakers.
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    The woman is being put on display by the director
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    who is careful to position her body
    so the protagonist can get a good look.
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    But the shots are also designed so
    the audience gets to peek along with him.
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    "Mr. Bishop, do you mind if I take a look?"
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    "Carl..."
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    This then makes the viewer complicit.
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    We are made to vicariously participate
    in the act of non-consensual looking.
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    "Really, 007?"
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    This is true, incidentally,
    even when the character doing the peeping
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    is clearly meant to be a creep.
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    There’s another important conversation to be had
    about what film theorist Laura Mulvey called
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    “the male gaze”
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    especially as it relates to how the camera moves
    and frames women’s bodies in a sexualized way
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    independent of the protagonist’s point of view.
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    But for our purposes here,
    we’re mostly focusing on the characters in the story.
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    The audience for movies is, of course,
    made up of people of all genders,
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    but the male character’s perspective
    is the one we are sharing
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    and therefore it’s his lurid excitement
    we are meant to identify with.
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    Just to reiterate, narratively speaking,
    these women don’t know they’re being watched
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    and therefore haven’t given consent.
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    Not to put too fine a point on it,
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    but the reason these scenes are
    supposed to be titillating to the viewer
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    is precisely because the looking
    is being done without permission.
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    "It's like we're seeing something
    we're not supposed to be seeing
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    which is kind of why it makes it so f***ing hot."
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    All the actors involved in these productions have,
    presumably,
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    agreed to be represented in the ways we see on-screen,
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    but fictional representations can still help
    normalize non-consensual behavior.
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    "Good afternoon!"
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    It’s worth quickly noting
    the particular type of actress
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    that filmmakers like to cast as the object of
    men’s voyeuristic attention.
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    Usually she’s young, thin, white,
    and conventionally attractive.
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    It’s such a well established pattern in Hollywood
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    that whenever the victim differs from
    that very specific expectation,
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    "Gotcha!"
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    the scene is used as a gross-out punchline
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    "A man!"
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    or a transphobic joke.
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    "That dude looks like a lady."
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    "Hey, wow! Look in that window!"
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    Scenes where boys surreptitiously
    spy on girls or women
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    are especially common in coming-of-age stories.
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    In these type of narratives spying is
    often presented as a rite-of-passage,
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    "Holy Christ!"
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    as just an inevitable part of
    young men’s sexual awakening.
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    The boys may be initially presented
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    as shy, awkward, or cowardly
    where women are concerned.
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    And it’s through their peeping behavior
    that they’re able to gain self-confidence.
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    According to the visual language of cinema,
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    spying on girls is a formative experience for boys,
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    so much so that it takes on an almost
    spiritual significance.
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    In this way the transition
    from boyhood into manhood
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    is built on a violation of women’s bodies.
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    "She was really deep in thought because
    she left herself unguarded a few times,
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    and I got to see halfway up her thighs that
    led up to the golden palace of the Himalayas."
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    Sometimes the boys are presented
    as melancholy loners,
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    but in other scenarios peeping is
    framed as a social activity.
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    " Her hands are moving down."
    "I gotta see this!"
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    The act of objectifying women
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    then becomes a bonding experience for young men.
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    An experience that also reinforces their shared
    sense of male dominance.
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    "Bag it and spank it, boys."
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    "Shit, get down!"
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    Now, don’t get me wrong,
    sexual curiosity is completely normal,
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    however non-consensual behavior
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    should never be confused
    for healthy sexual exploration.
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    The default should always be
    an expectation of privacy.
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    "Dude, I'm changing."
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    "Ah, sorry!"
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    In John Berger’s 1972 TV series “Ways of Seeing”
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    he observes that the act of looking isn’t passive.
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    It’s active.
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    Men dream of women,
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    women dream of themselves being dreamt of.
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    Men look at women,
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    women watch themselves being looked at
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    I don’t want to deny the crucial part
    that seeing plays in sexuality,
  • 17:04 - 17:06
    but there’s a great difference in being seen,
  • 17:06 - 17:09
    as oneself naked,
    or being seen by another in that way,
  • 17:09 - 17:12
    and a body being put on display.
  • 17:12 - 17:17
    Berger was talking about society
    as reflected in European oil paintings,
  • 17:17 - 17:21
    but the observation could just as
    easily be applied to cinema.
  • 17:22 - 17:25
    The male characters are active and fully dressed,
  • 17:26 - 17:28
    while the women are passive and exposed,
  • 17:28 - 17:33
    unprepared to be seen,
    and therefore framed as vulnerable.
  • 17:34 - 17:40
    This sets up an automatic power dynamic
    wherein the man has the upper-hand.
  • 17:42 - 17:45
    The message these scenarios
    send to women and girls
  • 17:45 - 17:49
    is that being spied on should be taken
    as a compliment,
  • 17:49 - 17:50
    "So you were watching me."
  • 17:52 - 17:54
    "But for how long? Just tonight?"
  • 17:55 - 17:57
    "A week, two weeks since I moved in?"
  • 17:57 - 18:02
    because men’s sexual attention is
    always supposed to be flattering,
  • 18:02 - 18:05
    regardless of whether or not
    those feelings are reciprocated.
  • 18:06 - 18:07
    "That's either the creepiest
  • 18:10 - 18:14
    or the sweetest thing I have ever heard."
  • 18:18 - 18:22
    In her essay “Intrusions”
    author Melissa Febos explains that
  • 18:23 - 18:29
    "Just as these productions encourage men to believe
    that stalking and peeping are acceptable forms of courtship,
  • 18:29 - 18:31
    likely to resolve in a love match,
  • 18:31 - 18:36
    so do they prescribe to women
    a desire to be the object of such behavior.”
  • 18:37 - 18:39
    "Think maybe I ought to pull this curtain.
  • 18:39 - 18:41
    There seems to someone staring
    at you from across the court."
  • 18:41 - 18:42
    "Oh, no. Don't do that.
  • 18:43 - 18:44
    My girlfriend and I,
    we never pull the curtain."
  • 18:45 - 18:46
    "We just have a ball with him."
  • 18:46 - 18:49
    In the movies and tv shows
    we’ve been discussing
  • 18:49 - 18:52
    it’s not uncommon for the woman
    who is being sped on
  • 18:52 - 18:57
    to indicate to the audience
    that she secretly enjoys this violation.
  • 18:59 - 19:02
    The underlying implication is clear,
  • 19:02 - 19:04
    to be desired by men
  • 19:04 - 19:07
    is what gives women value.
  • 19:07 - 19:08
    "Well, I think you should call the police!"
  • 19:09 - 19:11
    "Oh, no! That would spoil everything."
  • 19:11 - 19:13
    "After all, he's been so patient,
  • 19:13 - 19:15
    it only seems fair.
  • 19:16 - 19:17
    That dangerous message is
  • 19:17 - 19:21
    compounded by another idea
    baked into these scenes:
  • 19:23 - 19:29
    that when it comes to sexual desire, men and boys
    “just can’t control themselves.”
  • 19:31 - 19:35
    As if men are compelled by
    some invisible force of nature
  • 19:36 - 19:38
    to infringe upon women’s bodies.
  • 19:39 - 19:41
    The myth is not true, of course.
  • 19:41 - 19:45
    Men and boys can in fact control their urges.
  • 19:45 - 19:46
    "Hold up!"
  • 19:48 - 19:51
    Still, media reinforces the myth that
  • 19:51 - 19:54
    “men aren’t responsible for their own actions,”
  • 19:54 - 19:57
    occasionally by transforming the peeping tom
  • 19:57 - 20:02
    into a hapless victim
    of the woman’s seductive trap.
  • 20:02 - 20:06
    Here’s Melissa Febos again
    from her essay “Intrusions”
  • 20:06 - 20:08
    “It is also a narrative that exonerates men.
  • 20:09 - 20:12
    The more plausible it seems
    that women are always performing,
  • 20:12 - 20:15
    the less indictable the watching.”
  • 20:15 - 20:19
    "Next thing you know,
    she starts deliberately undressing
  • 20:19 - 20:21
    in front of the window, with the lights on."
  • 20:21 - 20:23
    "It's like she knew I was watching her."
  • 20:24 - 20:26
    It should be ludicrous on its face
  • 20:26 - 20:31
    to blame women for men’s illicit spying
  • 20:31 - 20:34
    but movies consistently leave us
    with the impression
  • 20:34 - 20:39
    that it’s the woman’s fault
    for allowing herself to be seen,
  • 20:39 - 20:42
    even when undressing
    in the privacy of her own home.
  • 20:43 - 20:45
    "Oh, god. You saw me?"
  • 20:46 - 20:49
    "You weren't trying to entice me with your nakedness?"
  • 20:50 - 20:51
    "No, no!
  • 20:51 - 20:55
    And you actually thought I wanted
    to have sex with you?"
  • 20:59 - 21:01
    Everything we’ve been discussing in this video
  • 21:01 - 21:06
    is part of a larger culture of male entitlement.
  • 21:07 - 21:10
    Too many men in our society have been taught
  • 21:10 - 21:14
    that women’s bodies should
    always be available to them.
  • 21:15 - 21:20
    Available to be evaluated,
    to be judged, to be compared,
  • 21:20 - 21:25
    and to be used as fuel in their personal fantasies.
  • 21:26 - 21:29
    "I believe I'm going to think about her
    before I go to sleep tonight."
  • 21:29 - 21:32
    "Anybody thinks about her,
    it's gonna be me."
  • 21:32 - 21:34
    By this twisted logic,
  • 21:34 - 21:37
    any woman who chooses not to put herself on display
  • 21:37 - 21:41
    is then taking away men’s “right to look.”
  • 21:42 - 21:44
    "Oh, come on.
    Don't go in the other room!
  • 21:44 - 21:45
    Oh, man."
  • 21:45 - 21:46
    At the end of the day,
  • 21:46 - 21:51
    the “Harmless” Peeping Tom trope
    is anything but harmless,
  • 21:51 - 21:54
    because it works to reinforce
    that sense of entitlement
  • 21:54 - 21:56
    by telling us again and again that
  • 21:57 - 22:01
    “nice guys” deserve access to women’s bodies.
  • 22:01 - 22:04
    "Did you sneak a peek
    at my goods?"
  • 22:05 - 22:08
    "I wouldn't be much of a hero if I did."
  • 22:09 - 22:11
    "Yeah, but it's okay if you peeked a little."
  • 22:12 - 22:14
    "You deserve a peek for
    all the good stuff you do."
  • 22:15 - 22:19
    And that therefore
    permission isn’t strictly necessary.
  • 22:19 - 22:21
    "Better view of my room that I thought."
  • 22:21 - 22:22
    "I've never seen you naked."
  • 22:24 - 22:25
    "It's too bad."
  • 22:26 - 22:27
    "I've got a great body."
  • 22:28 - 22:30
    "Turn around. Turn!"
  • 22:31 - 22:33
    "You're just a man,
    like all the others."
  • 22:34 - 22:40
    In recent years we have seen a rise in
    gender-flipped variations of the trope.
  • 22:41 - 22:46
    While these spying moments do invert
    the expected subject/object dynamics,
  • 22:47 - 22:52
    simply switching-up the genders where
    non-consensual behavior is concerned,
  • 22:52 - 22:55
    does not magically fix the problem.
  • 22:56 - 22:59
    Because it still reinforces that worldview
  • 23:00 - 23:05
    where respecting someone’s wishes in regards to
    their own body isn’t important.
  • 23:06 - 23:08
    As the old saying goes,
  • 23:08 - 23:11
    two wrongs do not make a right.
  • 23:13 - 23:18
    Learning about consent as it relates to looking,
    and not just touching, is essential,
  • 23:18 - 23:19
    "Oh, my god."
  • 23:19 - 23:20
    "What?"
  • 23:20 - 23:23
    especially given the reality of social media
  • 23:23 - 23:27
    and the growing problem of intimate images
    shared without persimmon.
  • 23:27 - 23:28
    "I can have this?"
  • 23:29 - 23:31
    "Yes. It's for you."
  • 23:32 - 23:35
    "Because you're the only man
    I ever want to gaze upon my body."
  • 23:36 - 23:40
    In today’s digital world,
    the private photos or videos of women
  • 23:40 - 23:43
    can be a social currency among boys and men.
  • 23:43 - 23:46
    "A picture's worth a thousand words."
  • 23:46 - 23:50
    A currency that can grant a guy status
    among his peers
  • 23:50 - 23:50
    "That's hot!"
  • 23:50 - 23:55
    by providing evidence of a woman’s submission
    to his sexual desire.
  • 23:55 - 23:56
    "It's not looking good, Tom."
  • 23:56 - 23:58
    "I just sent it to one other guy, because
  • 23:58 - 24:00
    he didn't believe that I'd had sex with Ruby."
  • 24:00 - 24:04
    Again we see how the act of exposing women’s bodies,
    without permission,
  • 24:05 - 24:07
    becomes a way for men to bond with each other
  • 24:07 - 24:11
    over their shared sense of male entertainment.
  • 24:17 - 24:21
    TV shows like Euphoria,
    Sex Education, and Stargirl
  • 24:21 - 24:25
    have all attempted to address the issue
    of unauthorized image sharing.
  • 24:26 - 24:31
    Unfortunately some TV writers
    just can’t resist adding a big plot twist
  • 24:31 - 24:34
    wherein it turns out the culprit is a “mean girl”
  • 24:34 - 24:37
    rather than the far more common situation in real-life
  • 24:37 - 24:41
    where the culprit is a current or ex-romantic partner.
  • 24:42 - 24:45
    "Joseph Lyman showed us
    the picture you gave him."
  • 24:46 - 24:46
    "What?"
  • 24:46 - 24:48
    "Oh, your nude self portrait.
  • 24:48 - 24:50
    He showed it to everyone."
  • 24:50 - 24:51
    "The whole town's seen it."
  • 24:51 - 24:53
    "The freaking mayor saw it."
  • 24:54 - 24:56
    The series Normal People
  • 24:56 - 25:01
    includes a scene of a guy showing off
    a naked picture of his girlfriend.
  • 25:01 - 25:05
    Rather than being impressed,
    the protagonist responds by saying it’s not okay.
  • 25:05 - 25:07
    "You do not think it's a bit f***ed up,
  • 25:07 - 25:08
    showing pictures of your girfriend like that?"
  • 25:08 - 25:11
    The moment is brief
    but it is notable for two reasons:
  • 25:12 - 25:13
    first it’s a rare example of
  • 25:13 - 25:18
    a man calling out another guy
    for non-consensual behavior,
  • 25:18 - 25:24
    and second because the producers chose
    not to show that image to the audience.
  • 25:25 - 25:28
    Even in media about how it’s wrong to share private images
  • 25:28 - 25:35
    media makers will often ensure that the audience
    gets a clear view of the photos or video in question.
  • 25:35 - 25:38
    The inclusion of these shots are unnecessary
  • 25:38 - 25:43
    and again make the viewers complicit
    in non-consensual looking.
  • 25:45 - 25:49
    Just as peeping is never the fault of
    the person who’s being spied on,
  • 25:50 - 25:56
    it’s also never the fault of the people whose
    intimate images are distributed without their permission.
  • 25:56 - 25:58
    The blame should rest entirely
  • 25:59 - 26:02
    with those sharing or looking without consent.
  • 26:02 - 26:04
    "You never should've sent him those."
  • 26:05 - 26:07
    "He never should've shared them."
  • 26:08 - 26:13
    It’s still very rare to see male characters in media
    who honor women’s privacy.
  • 26:13 - 26:16
    It’s even more rare to see men or boys intervening
  • 26:17 - 26:21
    to prevent their peers from non-consensual looking
  • 26:22 - 26:25
    but those are the types of representations
    that we need.
  • 26:25 - 26:26
    "All right, closing."
  • 26:27 - 26:31
    If we are to build a culture of
    affirmative and enthusiastic consent
  • 26:31 - 26:35
    it’s critical to understanding the ethics of looking.
  • 26:39 - 26:40
    I hope you enjoyed that video.
  • 26:40 - 26:43
    As you might imagine,
    these long-form video essays
  • 26:43 - 26:47
    take an enormous amount of time
    to write, edit, and produce.
  • 26:47 - 26:49
    So if you like this kind of media analysis
  • 26:49 - 26:54
    please consider going over to Patreon
    and helping to support this project there.
  • 26:54 - 26:58
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    in the description below.
  • 26:58 - 27:00
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  • 27:00 - 27:02
    and there's no sponsorships either.
  • 27:02 - 27:06
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    by viewers like you.
  • 27:06 - 27:08
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    exciting news.
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    called Pop Culture
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Title:
The Ethics of Looking And The "Harmless" Peeping Tom
Description:

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Video Language:
English
Duration:
28:00

English subtitles

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