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Transmission of Traits

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    Up until now, we've been assuming a connection between related individuals. It's
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    a rather fundamental assumption. So fundamental, we don't even know we do it.
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    >> Well, that's because it goes without saying. At some point,
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    we all had to have a biological mother and a biological father.
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    >> And this is true. But for our purposes, it's important to make
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    [INAUDIBLE].
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    An explicit connection about the traits we share as a
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    family as well as the genetic component that we also
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    share. Here are two pictures of my parents, my biological
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    mom and my biological dad. Take a look at both
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    and which do you think I look most like? Do
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    you think I look more like my mom or more
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    like my dad? Oh, Matt, that's a tough one. I
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    think I'm going to have to go with your mom, though.
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    >> Yeah, I think so, too.
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    Outside of our appearance, though, we may identify with
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    one parent or another because we may share a
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    particular trait that's visible or hidden, innate, or learned.
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    But it really raises a more interesting question. Why
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    do some of our traits looks like one parent,
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    and other traits look like the other? So if
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    you're familiar with your bioloical parents, who do you
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    think you most resemble? Check the box that applies.
Title:
Transmission of Traits
Video Language:
English
Team:
Udacity
Project:
BIO110 - Tales from the Genome
Duration:
01:09

English subtitles

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