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Red Blood Cells

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    Ok, Matt, I know blood cells are
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    important, especially the red blood cells, because
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    we hear about them all the time, but what exactly do blood cells do?
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    >> Well, red blood cells are one of the most populous cell types in your body,
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    because they carry out a very important function.
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    There's a very special molecule inside red blood cells
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    called hemoglobin that binds oxygen and carries it
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    to all the cracks and crevices in your
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    body. Its role is to actually go to
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    all these places and exchange oxygen for carbon dioxide.
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    It's the gas waste of our bodies. And even the shape. Everything about a red
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    blood cell is essentially tailored to help maximize
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    the efficiency of exchanging oxygen for carbon dioxide.
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    >> Wait. But then, what does that have
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    to do with blood type? Why does that matter?
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    >> That's a great question. Blood type doesn't
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    directly affect any oxygen consumption. But, on the
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    surface of red blood cells, like most cells
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    in your body, they're covered with different molecules
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    that determine the blood cell's type, as we
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    call it. This carbohydrate may or may not
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    be modified to have three different types. The
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    addition of an A antigen, the addition of a
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    B antigen, or no addition at all. And
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    whichever combination of these antigens you have is
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    called your blood type. Now the protein that
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    modifies the carbohydrate is an enzyme, a protein itself.
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    An enzyme is anything that catalyzes a biological reaction.
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    So if you look and see this enzyme adding the
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    A antigen, or the B antigen, or no antigen,
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    where do you think this enzyme, this protein, comes from?
Title:
Red Blood Cells
Video Language:
English
Team:
Udacity
Project:
BIO110 - Tales from the Genome
Duration:
01:32
Cogi-Admin edited English subtitles for Red Blood Cells
Cogi-Admin edited English subtitles for Red Blood Cells

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