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Easterhegg 2018 - Open Source Orgelbau

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    EasterHegg 18 preroll music
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    Benjamin: Yeah, my name is Benjamin Wand
    and I wanted to talk about organ building.
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    Why do I do that? First of all I like
    musical instruments in general, and
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    then I noticed that it is
    actually a cool nerd topic
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    because it connects two things that,
    or it has two things that
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    always are present with nerd-things,
    first of all making things available,
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    that is, musical instrument making still
    gets passed on from master
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    to disciple and it is not so
    greatly publicly documented and is
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    just cool to reverse-engineer things.
    And the other thing is that with
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    nerd-things one always likes to
    absurdly optimize, and that is in any case
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    given as well for musical instrument
    making, they are very, they work
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    very precisely and have very exact ideas
    about what they do
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    so to speak musical instrument making
    is all in all a perfect
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    nerd-topic. Yes, everyone has seen
    an organ, they look like that, and what
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    you see here only the facade,
    there are many more
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    organ pipes inside, one takes
    just a bunch that one finds pretty and
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    attaches them in the front, such an
    interior designer person does that. And
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    behind that, that thing is called positive
    when there are organ pipes in the middle
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    of the gallery, behind that is the
    console, that is so to speak the
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    user interface. But I thought I'd first
    say some general things, well
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    laughter
    somewhere data has to get in, one
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    pushes buttons and stuff and then
    somewhere comes air. A big church organ
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    runs at something like 0.1 bar but it is a
    lot of volume, that is why there are those
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    bellows. Organ builders indeed still put
    stones on their bellows for the weight
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    nowadays. Somehow data has to get from
    A to B, therefore many organ builders have
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    thought out many things, mostly they have
    to do with mechanical transmission
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    or with pneumatic transmission and of
    course nowadays also electronic.
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    And then we have organized air, that is
    what actually happens with
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    wind instruments, it goes to the pipes
    and tones come out. Like I said, there are
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    very many kinds of organ pipes,
    they all sound a bit differently.
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    Those are common models
    that someone has kindly
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    drawn for the Wikipedia, and then it is
    like that that of every kind of pipe
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    which is present there is one keyboard
    full of pipes available,
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    very small to very big, and they are called
    something with foot and that is the
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    length of the lowest tone, when for instance
    a row of organ pipes is called '8 foot'
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    that means that the longest pipe is
    eight foot long, 2.40 meters
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    This one could call the cockpit of a
    romantic organ. Organs were, ...
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    there is a big period in the
    Baroque Music and a big period in the
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    Romantic Music. There are the keyboards,
    at organs they are called
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    manual and then down there there is a
    foot-keyboard, called pedal, then it has
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    stuff to set dynamics here, down there
    are things to operate by foot,
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    a lever can be operated like that
    there are also some to roll
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    there are here on the side, and there are
    displays for the status
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    And then there are all those
    toggle switches, they are the
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    stop tabs, they make whether
    a row of organ pipes is on
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    one can imagine it like that, given
    you have these kinds of pipes, they
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    stick to a keyboard, there is always
    a set of organ pipes per keyboard
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    this is only one octave but virtually
    in every box would be a pipe
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    of every kind one, of every size one,
    four and a half octaves for
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    one keyboard and two and a half for the
    pedal. And they stand in a
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    toe board, it is not necessarily
    rectangular but they mill-cut around the
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    corner if that fits better
    and when one chooses pipes
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    now those both rows, so to say
    they are on, and then pushes
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    one tone, the yellow sketched in pipes
    receive air and it toots.
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    Yes? That is how it works. Ok, and what
    now? Like I said I like musical instruments
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    and last summer I had an internship at an
    organ maker and
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    unfortunately I found it terrible, but for
    me the result was that I wanted to try to
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    build an organ with real dynamics like
    on a piano. Now I'm
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    one too far but that doesn't matter.
    Like that, that is a recording that I
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    ... electronically ... doesn't sound well,
    but just that you see
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    what I mean by dynamics, because there
    aren't always only musicians.
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    It still has to work.
    electic piano
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    That is so to say 'piano',
    if you push hard
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    loud and soft tones come.
    electric piano
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    If you do that with an organ it doesn't
    work, no matter how hard you push, ok?
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    Hammond organ
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    Not hard to see.
    Hammond organ
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    That is an old thing, trying to teach
    dynamics to keyboard instruments,
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    the piano emerged that way, regarding
    the harpsichord people complained
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    that it sounds like 8-bit music and people
    wanted more resolution.
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    laughter
    Exactly. And for the organ it still
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    doesn't really work. There are several
    reasons for that. First of all,
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    keyboard instrument in general have
    a focus on music theory. If you
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    imagine a band, the dude at the keyboard
    is the nerd. Not always but that's a thing.
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    And that a tone on a keyboard instrument,
    that it is one state,
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    a digital state, buys polyphony.
    One can play many tones at once
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    and do complex things on the piano
    and that is possible
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    because one tone is always one thing,
    otherwise it would be crazy. There are
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    those seaboards where you can slide the
    finger, but I haven't seen
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    decent music for it, at least no
    polyphonic one. That is the classic
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    that keyboard instruments are connected
    with music theory and polyphony
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    Then this is the case with organs:
    they are expensive and very
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    conservative people pay for it,
    churches and alike, they don't like
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    experiments. And if an inventor
    builds something, he builds a prototype
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    with three tones, and then a musician makes
    sung: doo doo doo doo doo doo
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    'What is this?
    I can not do anything with it'
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    And then, there are two types of organ
    pipes that were on the picture,
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    labial pipes and lingual pipes, and those
    are labial pipes. They look like
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    a recorder and work like it,
    and are limited in their ability to
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    perform dynamics because
    the pitch changes, like that
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    labial pipe Do you hear that?
    It goes a bit higher and lower
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    and that makes many things in music
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    complicated. Not impossible but it is
    a disadvantage
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    Like shown in the picture of the cockpit,
    there were attempts to get
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    dynamics on the organ. The first one was
    the swell box, there is a set
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    of organ pipes in a box
    and it has doors in he front that
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    can be closed and opened and
    depending how open they are
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    the louder or softer it is. And then,
    in the Romantic Organ one invented
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    a thing called crescendo pedal,
    there you can't only switch on
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    and off organ stops with a toggle switch
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    but thee are presets where you can
    choose loudness and it works
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    on its own, switches stops on and off
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    depending how 'loud' you make it. But
    then it still doesn't influence how
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    much you push on each key, right? The
    volume adjustment ist always for
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    the entire keyboard.
    And then in Romantic Music some organs
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    had the feature that when
    you depress a button only half way
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    the pipe only gets half air.
    Thats nice, and you saw with the pipe
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    it is a bit complicated but possible.
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    This technology had the problem that
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    when you depressed a key
    you always had to lift each valve
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    that belonged to all the used pipes,
    meaning that if you used
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    many stops you had to push very hard
    with your fingers, that's why
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    it was hard for musicians.
    And now one can
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    replicate that with electronics,
    one measures
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    how deeply the key is depressed,
    with a hall sensor, and then one moves
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    the valve on the other side,
    like the input was.
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    There is this yummy talk, they explain it
    thoroughly how this company Heuss does it,
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    that is one of their employees,
    they programmed it.
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    The problem though is, and that is why
    I don't consider it a solution:
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    one can't play with half depressed keys.
    Imagine writing code and some shortcuts
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    are on half depressed keys.
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    laughter
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    Nice thing, I call it 'expressive play',
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    it is still not dynamics but
    expressive play.
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    Not bad, actually quite cool,
    but still not dynamics.
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    What have I done until now?
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    First of all I looked into this problem
    that pipes have this property
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    to change the pitch with the air pressure.
    Or rather
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    I didn't do it but 25 years ago someone
    invented a new type or organ pipe.
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    I have to go to FreeCAD.
    This is a reed of a harmonica
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    or any other free reed instrument,
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    the thin sheet is fixed on the
    thick sheet with a rivet, and if you
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    blow on it from above a tone comes,
    approximately like that.
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    harmonica-tone
    And the interesting thing he invented,
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    his name was Ernst Zacharias,
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    is that if you put such a thing
    the wrong way around
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    into a tube, it shouldn't work but it does.
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    And that is a not so good pipe
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    but I made one myself.
    Like I said, it has the lovely property
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    that you can change the volume a bit
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    without changing the pitch.
    Zacharias-pipe
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    Though one can see in the spectrogram
    that the partials change a bit.
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    Zacharias-pipe
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    When one blows more there are more
    overtones, it isn't entirely
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    free of side effects but that is
    quite cool.
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    Then, I 3d-printed many organ pipes
    and brought some.
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    Those, there is a list how to do it,
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    how to do the proportions
    if you have different sizes of organ pipes.
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    I've made a standard set
    with different diameters of tube.
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    The reason for the tubes is: organ pipes
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    are large, they don't fit into the 3d
    printer, I didn't want to do wood working,
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    led isn't that good in the kitchen.
    laughter
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    Organ metal is a great material
    but not so accessible for private people.
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    Those are pipes that should belong
    together, that are made according to
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    standard measurements.
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    labial pipe
    Maybe we should go back to
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    the spectrogram, that is interesting
    as well. And the meaning of the matter
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    is supposed to be that the overtone-stuff
    looks somewhat similar.
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    labial pipe
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    I'd say that is alright, for other pipes
    it looks very differently,
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    that is a flute.
    labial pipe
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    See it, right?
    inaudible question from the audience
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    Yes, maybe I should talk a bit about this.
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    The lowest tone is the one you hear,
    for example that one, and then it is the
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    case that in a resonator not only the
    basic frequency vibrates
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    but also multiples of it, and depending
    what shape the pipe has, like
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    how big this hole is in relation to
    the length and diameter
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    these proportions influence the sound
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    and that is how there are different kinds
    of organ pipes.
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    inaudible question from the audience
    'How many partials do I want'
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    was the question,
    I should repeat the questions. That is ...
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    I'd love to have such recordings from
    normal organ pipes but I don't have them.
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    inaudible question from the audience
    Printing those things once
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    in different sizes was the goal here,
    to see whether if the
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    proportions are similar, do they sound
    similar enough to be called one organ stop.
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    What one can see with them is that they
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    sound funny in the beginning,
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    always when I start to blow,
    instantly really, I get the tone you saw.
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    labial pipe
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    But when I blow little you see
    a funny effect.
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    labial pipe Great (not).
    But here in the beginning one could see it.
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    labial pipe
    Before it had a little swerve.
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    That means, I wouldn't print a whole set
    of them, as they are now, for
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    an organ with dynamics,
    that would be rubbish.
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    I'll talk about the file now.
    These FreeCAD files can be found on GitHub,
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    and when one look at one,
    one first has to go to the spreadsheet,
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    put in values for the thickness of the
    tube, outside and inside, how wide
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    and high do I want that opening.
    And the block chamfer, honestly
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    I don't know what it is good for
    but it exists in recorders,
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    it is this edge here, one can switch it
    on and off in the FreeCAD file.
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    And this is such an organ pipe.
    I've always slices them at a 45° angle,
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    like that, with the goal to not have
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    to remove support structure from inside,
    one always tries to get the labium smooth,
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    and also this tube where you blow through
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    if you have support structure inside
    it is not so nice to get out.
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    So, I always printed them on 45°,
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    and then I had the idea
    to rotate the interesting part 45°
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    and designed those.
    I've tried printing but it didn't work.
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    There is a 3d printer in the hackcenter
    but it is clogged.
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    I'm very curious how it'll sound, whether
    this is useful.
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    I've also made other experimental things
    like traverse flutes
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    and funny things where you can stick
    a tube in on both sides.
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    One can design the wildest things in 3d.
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    inaudible question from the audience
    I do't understand the question.
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    Wait, there is a microphone for you.
    Audience: The result is,
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    if it sounds at all it should sound with
    a wide spectrum, with a washed-out tone,
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    right?
    Benjamin: I'm curious.
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    I've made fun things,
    for instance files with
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    a curved labium. I'm interested in this
    because it limits the effect
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    that the pitch changes, it is less in those.
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    labial pipe
    It is there but very small, much less
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    then with those. I don't know why.
    And curved labium is also new, I haven't
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    seen musical instruments with that feature,
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    because if you build from wood it would
    be complicated but with 3d printing -
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    no problem. laughter
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    I'm curious how it sounds,
    I have no idea, none at all.
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    But if it would work that would be cool.
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    inaudible question from the audience
    Yes, when I'm home I can do this
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    but if someone could print it now that
    would be cool, sure, then we can try
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    it here at EasterHegg.
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    Another thing I've changed is the thing
    is the thing at the bottom, for the case
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    to stick a tube inside because I thought
    a good next step would be
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    a small instrument with pneumatic action
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    and no or almost no electronics
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    in order to test pipes on a keybord
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    because so far I can only blow inside,
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    would be cooler to play on a keyboard.
    That is an image of a pipe I've played
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    so that you can imagine it better.
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    So far I've just fixed it with tape.
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    That is another folder, also on GitHub,
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    it has those inverted free reed pipes.
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    A thing that I find particularly
    interesting with those pipes is
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    playing Shepherd tones. Like that,
    imagine that the red tones are 'f's,
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    one would play 'f's of all octaves at once,
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    in the middle louder than outside.
    That is a popular toy in film music,
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    one can do fun psychoacoustic tricks
    with it and this would be the first time
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    to play Shepherd tones
    on an acoustic instrument.
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    It would be either possible to build
    a stop of Shepherd tones,
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    which would be plausible as well because
    one needs eight octaves, which is
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    more than a normal organ has, or one
    does it with proportional air supply,
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    that the pipes that play the Shepherd
    tones can be used as normal tones.
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    Thoughts about keyboard expression.
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    I had mentioned before that there are those
    Romantic organs that measure what
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    gets replicated as electronic, how deeply
    the key is depressed. That isn't the
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    only possibility how to do that.
    If one builds an electric piano,
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    the speed, in which the keys get
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    depressed, gets measured, that is
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    another input, and a third way is the
    pressure on the key, that is when one buys
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    a keyboard with polyphonic aftertouch,
    it measured the pressure
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    on the depressed keys. And in the long
    run I'd prefer that, becauee
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    then one can change the volume of an
    already pressed key, other than when
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    measuring the speed. On the other hand
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    you don't have the problem of not being
    able to play with half depressed keys.
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    How ever, it will be a new instrument and
    I'm assuming that it'll take a pianist
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    two or three months to get used to it, to
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    this new way, that the pressure gets
    measured. Most pianists can't play
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    on the clavichord. At the clavichord the
    pressure gets measured and
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    influences the pitch. Usually it sounds
    terrible at first but
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    some pianists can already do it,
    one can learn it.
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    How ever. There is one thing I need
    and not having it keeps me from
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    progressing with the project, and I'm
    hoping for a miracle in the form of
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    a person, and the problem is the actuator.
    An organ with electric direct action
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    would use an actuator that looks like this
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    there are two magnets and this thing here
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    can be moved up and down, proportionally
    how deeply the key is depressed.
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    The problem is that this is fairly
    expensive and I'd like to have one for
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    each pipe, I'd like to get rid of the
    matrix, also for example
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    for performing Shepherd tones.
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    If each pipe gets their own actuator,
    that is a point where I can't continue
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    at the moment, why I would build
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    a small thing with pneumatic action
    because that is easier.
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    If someone had an idea about
    fluid dynamics, that would be cool
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    to figure out why the pipes with
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    the curved labium change the pitch
    less than the others.
  • 24:43 - 24:48
    That would be cool.
    And i've told the thing with the
  • 24:48 - 24:55
    actuator to many people, and then they
    reply 'use a servo'. But that won't work
  • 24:55 - 25:02
    because they are either too slow
    or too noisy. You've probably seen
  • 25:02 - 25:05
    on YouTube someone play the
    Super Mario theme on
  • 25:05 - 25:10
    stepper motors. They are really noisy!
    Or they are expensive.
  • 25:10 - 25:14
    Less noisy servos exist but somewhere
    in this triangle it is not getting better.
  • 25:14 - 25:18
    Pneumatics, same problem, also
    expensive.
  • 25:18 - 25:29
    inaudible question from the audience
    Question: what does the actuator do?
  • 25:29 - 25:34
    The actuator does that a thing can move
    between two points, and also in-between.
  • 25:34 - 25:39
    And I'd say that the illusion of it being
  • 25:39 - 25:41
    continuous would be at at least 20 steps.
  • 25:41 - 25:48
    inaudible question from the audience
    Exactly, I need a proportional valve.
  • 25:48 - 25:58
    Like I said, at the moment I'm planning
  • 25:58 - 26:02
    to build a small instrument with pneumatic
    action in order to continue working
  • 26:02 - 26:07
    on my pipes. The whole stuff in on GitHub
    if you're curious, and I'm looking
  • 26:07 - 26:14
    to hear from other builders of
    musical instruments.
  • 26:14 - 26:17
    Are there more questions? There is a
    microphone, than the questions will
  • 26:17 - 26:25
    be on the stream, that would be cool.
    There is one.
  • 26:25 - 26:39
    Audience: Hi, I'm Max and I play organ.
    Hello Martin. And I work at a university
  • 26:39 - 26:43
    that has measurement technology,
    and we do a course,
  • 26:43 - 26:46
    so far I'm officially responsible,
    for the Cultural Studies, what
  • 26:46 - 26:51
    was it called? Digital Sound-synthesis.
    There we have some measuring devices and
  • 26:51 - 26:53
    the university does have an organ.
    You've said
  • 26:53 - 26:58
    you'd like to do acoustic measurements
    of some stops,
  • 26:58 - 27:01
    Possibly you can be helped.
  • 27:01 - 27:05
    Benjamin: Oh yes, that sounds great, we
    should do it. The files
  • 27:05 - 27:09
    are called '0 - something', and
    that is very undetermined,
  • 27:09 - 27:13
    I thought I'd go '1' once I've figured out
    how I want to do it with the toe board.
  • 27:13 - 27:24
    So to speak what is there on the right,
  • 27:24 - 27:27
    organ pipes have certain diameters
    that have to fit, one can exchange
  • 27:27 - 27:31
    the pipes, and I haven#t figured out
    how I'd do it because I always used to
  • 27:31 - 27:35
    blow in with the mouth and I thought
    I'll call it '1-something' after deciding
  • 27:35 - 27:39
    how the lower side should look like,
  • 27:39 - 27:46
    the interface to the outside. Yes,
    I'd have to do that in order to
  • 27:46 - 27:51
    put the 3d printed pipes into a toe board,
    right? You don't know either.
  • 27:51 - 27:54
    inaudible question from the audience
  • 27:54 - 28:00
    That would be cool, because it is badly
    documented until now, I rarely
  • 28:00 - 28:06
    find spectrograms like this.
  • 28:06 - 28:13
    inaudible question from the audience
    Yes, we'll talk afterwards, looking forwards.
  • 28:13 - 28:20
    There, another question.
    Audience: In Stuttgart at ...
  • 28:20 - 28:23
    Benjamin: ... Fraunhofer ...
    Audience: ... am Fraunhofer Institut,
  • 28:23 - 28:26
    okay, you know them.
    Benjamin: I've tried to contact them
  • 28:26 - 28:28
    but nothing happened.
  • 28:28 - 28:31
    Audience: Ok, that is unfortunate because
    coincidentally
  • 28:31 - 28:38
    I know that they have a tool for
    parametric design of organ pipes, where
  • 28:38 - 28:42
    one can choose partials and they also do
  • 28:42 - 28:47
    fluid dynamics and stuff.
  • 28:47 - 28:52
    But I don't know either how happily
    they give it to people but they
  • 28:52 - 28:55
    certainly have cool things.
    Benjamin: Ja, that was what I found as
  • 28:55 - 29:01
    well, but like I said, they didn't want
    to talk to me. Good, there is
  • 29:01 - 29:06
    another question next to you.
    Audience: I can make contact,
  • 29:06 - 29:11
    my cousin is professional organ builder,
  • 29:11 - 29:16
    who usually does restoration and new
    construction of classical pipe organs,
  • 29:16 - 29:19
    but I could imagine to make contact and
    one could visit his workshop
  • 29:19 - 29:22
    that should be easy.
  • 29:22 - 29:25
    Benjamin: Where is it?
  • 29:25 - 29:28
    Audience: Siegen.
    Benjamin: Mh, like I said, I did an
  • 29:28 - 29:30
    internship at an organ workshop, that
    wasn't delightful.
  • 29:30 - 29:33
    Audience: That wasn't my cousin.
  • 29:33 - 29:35
    Benjamin: Yeah ...
    laughter
  • 29:35 - 29:39
    Benjamin: But sure, I don't think that my
    3d printed organ pipes are that supreme,
  • 29:39 - 29:45
    right? Rather it is a toy for prototyping
  • 29:45 - 29:49
    and trying things out, like
  • 29:49 - 29:53
    curved labium, that would be a lot more
    effort with wood, and metal would
  • 29:53 - 29:57
    but someone would have to pay for it.
  • 29:57 - 30:07
    I don't know what exactly metal pipes
    cost but more than this.
  • 30:07 - 30:13
    Audience: At a restauration sometimes
  • 30:13 - 30:18
    some pipes are left over.
  • 30:18 - 30:23
    Benjamin: Yes, cool, thanks.
  • 30:23 - 30:33
    Are there more questions? You can also
    try all of them, for instance this
  • 30:33 - 30:38
    where one sticks it in the middle, oh,
    ask your question.
  • 30:38 - 30:41
    Audience: What do you want to determine
  • 30:41 - 30:45
    with your proportional valve,
    the pressure or the volume of air?
  • 30:45 - 30:55
    Benjamin: The volume. The pressure is even
    per stop, different stops can have
  • 30:55 - 30:59
    different pressure but the pressure
  • 30:59 - 31:07
    is even within one stop, and then the
  • 31:07 - 31:15
    actuator moves right-left back and forth,
  • 31:15 - 31:21
    to move the valve.
  • 31:21 - 31:27
    inaudible question from the audience
  • 31:27 - 31:32
    That is really a bit odd.
  • 31:32 - 31:36
    This looks like a recorder, right?
  • 31:36 - 31:41
    And in a recorder, German: Blockflöte,
    there is the block inside. But here
  • 31:41 - 31:51
    nothing alike is inside. I found it funny
    that that works and thought apparently
  • 31:51 - 31:55
    the labium doesn't need to be at the
    end of the pipe, it isn't
  • 31:55 - 32:00
    necessary, and then I made one ...
    or several ... where one can plug in a
  • 32:00 - 32:03
    tube on both ends. But I can't make sense
  • 32:03 - 32:12
    of the pitch that comes out.
    labial pipe, several pitches
  • 32:12 - 32:24
    laughter Interesting, but
    I don't have an explanation.
  • 32:24 - 32:38
    What? Ok.
    labial pipe, several pitches
  • 32:38 - 32:48
    inaudible question from the audience
    Yes, that is plausible but why so high,
  • 32:48 - 33:00
    the length if the pipe doesn't
    match the pitch.
  • 33:00 - 33:07
    Yeah.
    inaudible question from the audience
  • 33:07 - 33:19
    What do I do when I cover what?
    Oh yes, let's try.
  • 33:19 - 33:28
    labial pipe, changing pitch
    laughter
  • 33:28 - 33:33
    music
    There are several ways to tune
  • 33:33 - 33:37
    organ pipes, this is one of them. There is
    a piece of sheet metal attached on top
  • 33:37 - 33:45
    and you can bend it onto and away from the
    pipe. I've also tried 3d printing items
  • 33:45 - 33:51
    for tuning organ pipes but that was
    all rubbish, the only thing that worked
  • 33:51 - 33:55
    was t stick another tube onto it, or a lid
  • 33:55 - 33:59
    in case of a stopped pipe, and to
    move it up and down, things with
  • 33:59 - 34:04
    folding din't work in 3d printing.
  • 34:04 - 34:12
    Weird. There, a question in the back.
    inaudible question from the audience
  • 34:12 - 34:17
    Audience: Oh, once again with mike.
    If you do the finger on it, you're
  • 34:17 - 34:19
    making a half stopped pipe, which means
    the tube gets longer.
  • 34:19 - 34:21
    Benjamin: Yes.
    Audience: It makes sense that
  • 34:21 - 34:27
    is gets lower.
    Benjamin: What exactly make sense, that?
  • 34:27 - 34:30
    No. That?
    labial pipe, different pitch
  • 34:30 - 34:41
    But why is it a fifth? For a stopped pipe
    it should be an octave.
  • 34:41 - 34:43
    laughter
  • 34:43 - 34:46
    Audience: They have different length.
  • 34:46 - 34:53
    Benjamin: Yes, should we, do I have two
    of identical length? Yes, If I take this
  • 34:53 - 35:07
    and add that. So, same length now, ok?
  • 35:07 - 35:17
    labial pipe, different pitch
    It wants to overblow, that doesn't fit.
  • 35:17 - 35:24
    I don't gat the basic frequency.
    labial pipe, different pitch
  • 35:24 - 35:32
    That tends to happen when a tube is
    too thin relative to the length. If one
  • 35:32 - 35:37
    wants to have a sound with lots of
    partials, one makes a thinner pipe but
  • 35:37 - 35:44
    when one overdoes it one doesn't get
    the basic frequency anymore.
  • 35:44 - 35:54
    inaudible question from the audience
    Yes, brass instruments.
  • 35:54 - 36:01
    laughter
    inaudible question from the audience
  • 36:01 - 36:07
    Exactly.
    inaudible question from the audience
  • 36:07 - 36:17
    laughter
    Ok, then not, don't know. There is a limit
  • 36:17 - 36:21
    to how much I can recommend blowing
    into them because I was very sick last week.
  • 36:21 - 36:26
    laughter
    But apart from that you are invited to
  • 36:26 - 36:30
    try them all. They all look a bit
    differently. I've also made
  • 36:30 - 36:35
    traverse flutes.
  • 36:35 - 36:42
    traverse flute
    I just wanted to try it.
  • 36:42 - 36:48
    Makes a tone.
    Cool, thanks.
  • 36:48 - 36:55
    applause
  • 36:56 - 37:00
    postroll music
  • 37:00 - 37:07
    subtitles created by c3subtitles.de
    in the year 2018. Join, and help us!
Title:
Easterhegg 2018 - Open Source Orgelbau
Description:

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Video Language:
German
Duration:
37:07

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