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https:/.../Black+Codes+and+Pig+Laws+Slavery+By+Another+Name+Bento+PBS.mp4

  • 0:03 - 0:06
    But even after African Americans begin
    to be a part of the political process,
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    the state legislators of the south
    passed more and more and more
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    restrictive measures which
    were effectively designed
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    to criminalize Black life.
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    To make it impossible for any
    African American man
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    who didn't live under the explicit
    protection of some white landowner
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    to not be in violation of
    some law at almost all times.
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    And the kinds of things we're talking
    about are absurd to modern ears
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    but it was a crime in the south for a
    farm worker to walk beside a railroad.
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    It was a crime in the south to speak
    loudly in the company of white women.
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    It was a crime to sell the products
    of your farm after dark
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    almost anywhere in the south.
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    There were reasons, there were sort of
    odd logics behind almost all of these
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    almost all of these laws and
    none of them said that they
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    applied excursively to African Americans
    but overwhelmingly they were
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    only ever enforced against
    African Americans because
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    the explicit intent, and when I say
    the intent was explicit, it was.
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    In the constitutional convention
    of Alabama in 1901 when
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    a new constitution was passed
    which effectively ended all Black
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    participation in political life
    and public life in Alabama,
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    the discussions around the drafting
    of these laws were very open
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    about the intention of to make it
    impossible for Black men
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    to participate in mainstream
    America life in any meaningful way.
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    But the most powerful,
    the most damaging
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    of all of these laws were
    the vagrancy statutes
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    where in every southern state,
    it became a crime, or you became
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    a criminal if you could not prove at any
    given moment that you were employed.
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    What white southerners then discovered
    was that this was also an extraordinarily
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    effective way of intimidating
    African Americans away from
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    the new civil rights they'd obtained
    as a result of the 13th amendment
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    and the end of the Civil War.
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    These laws passed to force them
    back into labor also intimidated them
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    away from the political process
    or could be used to intimidate them
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    away from the political process.
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    And so by the end of the 19th century,
    on the basis of these two strategies
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    of white southerners, enormous populations
    of African Americans had been returned to
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    a state of de facto slavery and
    had been effectively pushed
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    completely, entirely out of the
    political process and they
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    would not return for six decades.
Title:
https:/.../Black+Codes+and+Pig+Laws+Slavery+By+Another+Name+Bento+PBS.mp4
Video Language:
English
Duration:
02:49

English subtitles

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