Return to Video

https:/.../30c3-5610-de-Seidenstrasse_h264-iprod.mp4

  • 0:17 - 0:21
    (Mey Lean Kronemann) Also ich bin Mey, und Frank kennt ihr ja.
  • 0:22 - 0:28
    Und wir stellen euch heute die Seidenstraße vor.
  • 0:29 - 0:38
    Dem einen oder anderen ist vielleicht schon beim Reinkommen so dieses gelbe Rohr, das draußen an der Fassade hängt, aufgefallen
  • 0:38 - 0:43
    (Frank Rieger) Und die Frage war natürlich: Was machen wir eigentlich mit diesem Rohr?
  • 0:43 - 0:46
    Also, was soll dieses Rohr?
  • 0:46 - 0:55
    Es sind 2 km davon, von denen liegen jetzt so ungefähr 1100 m schon im Gebäude.
  • 0:57 - 1:01
    Und einige Leute haben auch schon gefragt: Gibt es ein Wasserproblem in dem Gebäude?
  • 1:02 - 1:05
    Unerwarteten Regen, mit dem wir nicht klarkommen.
  • 1:05 - 1:07
    Nein, es handelt sich um ein Netzwerk.
  • 1:08 - 1:11
    *M: Und zwar um ein Rohrpostnetzwerk.
  • 1:11 - 1:14
    Und warum der schöne Name Seidenstraße?
  • 1:14 - 1:18
    Die Seidenstraße ist ein Netzwerk von Handelsrouten.
  • 1:18 - 1:22
    Das existiert schon ziemlich lange, es existiert auch heute noch.
  • 1:23 - 1:30
    In der Tat war es auch auch nie so, dass ein Kaufmann praktisch die ganze Seidenstraße bereist hat,
  • 1:30 - 1:34
    sondern das lief immer über Zwischenhändler.
  • 1:34 - 1:40
    Auch heute noch wird darüber geschmuggelt. Drogen gehandelt.
  • 1:40 - 1:43
    Frank: Alternative Logistiker aller Art.
  • 1:43 - 1:47
    *M: Sicherheit war schon immer ein Problem auf der Seidenstraße.
  • 1:49 - 1:56
    Frank: Deswegen fanden wir, das ist ein guter Name für die Rohrpost, auf dem Kongress.
  • 1:57 - 1:59
    *M: Also es wurden nicht nur Güter gehandelt auf der Seidenstraße,
  • 1:59 - 2:06
    sondern es wurden auch Kulturen dadurch verbreitet, auch Krankheiten…
  • 2:06 - 2:11
    Frank: Also alles Probleme, die wir im Kleinen hier dann wiederfinden.
  • 2:13 - 2:18
    *M: Und unser Netzwerk besteht also aus besagtem Drainagerohr.
  • 2:18 - 2:22
    Hier seht ihr 2 km auf Rollen aufgewickelt.
  • 2:22 - 2:25
    Frank: Das sind immer so 50 Meter pro Ring.
  • 2:25 - 2:31
    Der wichtige Punkt ist - wenn ihr das zu Hause nachbauen wollt in eurem Hackerspace - es gibt diese Drainagerohre einmal mit Löchern
  • 2:31 - 2:38
    Lachen
  • 2:38 - 2:40
    und einmal ohne Löcher, das ist das, was ihr wollt.
  • 2:40 - 2:44
    Kosten alle genau das gleiche, ungefähr einen Euro pro Meter.
  • 2:44 - 2:47
    *M: Und für den Betrieb nutzen wir Staubsauger
  • 2:47 - 2:52
    und zwar so Industriestaubsauger, die sowohl saugen, als auch pusten können.
  • 2:53 - 2:54
    Da vorne steht einer.
  • 2:56 - 3:04
    Mit dem Anschluss für das Drainagerohr. Das ist so ein typisches Abwasserrohr – das graue da, was man da sieht...
  • 3:04 - 3:07
    ...mit so einem Adapter und dann kann man das schön aneinanderstecken.
  • 3:09 - 3:16
    So, jetzt fragt ihr euch sicherlich: Wie kommt man auf die Idee, eine Rohrpost mit Drainagerohr zu betreiben?
  • 3:16 - 3:21
    Und in der Tat war das nicht unsere Idee, sondern das gab es schonmal,
  • 3:21 - 3:26
    und zwar dieses Jahr auf der Transmediale im Haus der Kulturen der Welt.
  • 3:26 - 3:35
    Und zwar haben die Telekommunisten sich das ausgedacht. Es hieß Octo, aber da werden wir euch gleich selber etwas darüber erzählen.
  • 3:35 - 3:39
    Und zwar: Für die Telekommunisten haben wir hier Diani Barreto und Jeff Mann.
  • 3:39 - 3:48
    Applaus
  • 3:51 - 3:53
    Diani Barreto: Hello Hamburg!
  • 3:53 - 3:56
    We're absolutely delighted to be here.
  • 3:57 - 4:07
    It has been a very crazy year and it all started at Haus der Kulturen der Welt with our largest project, most cumbersome project to date...
  • 4:07 - 4:18
    ...and it was one kilometer of tubing that you just saw and I came in last night and I was hearing this wrrrr-srrrr... I was so happy with it, a wonderful flashback.
  • 4:18 - 4:28
    I'd like to thank the CCC for inviting us here and Mey Lean Kronemann's inspiration and having invited us here that's a really great honour
  • 4:28 - 4:33
    and we're really flattered and to see how this new and improved version of Octo – you know,
  • 4:33 - 4:37
    distributed, open-source, open-hardware... it only gets better.
  • 4:37 - 4:42
    This was the original capsule, as you can see, the little cardboard there...
  • 4:42 - 4:45
    ...and now we have 3D technology. Really nice!
  • 4:45 - 4:47
    That was our original intention.
  • 4:47 - 4:55
    We failed in our crowdfunding seed launch and so we were really happy to say okay well, let's just go open source.
  • 4:55 - 5:00
    So I am here to actually to thank everyone, this is like an Oscar price.
  • 5:00 - 5:10
    Thank you very much CCC, Frank Rieger, Mey, Georg Sedlag and all the hackerspaces that worked on this
  • 5:11 - 5:21
    and for keeping the Octo/the idea alive and of course the team of Transmediale that also had the faith in us in bringing this very cumbersome project forward.
  • 5:21 - 5:26
    The curators Tatiana Bazzichelli and Kristoffer Gansing (I don't know if they are here today)
  • 5:26 - 5:32
    and the team at Transmediale and Raumlabor and serve you for helping us
  • 5:32 - 5:35
    to create the wonderful terminals and the technology involved.
  • 5:35 - 5:46
    I'd like to thank our octo brosis who are our debugging crew... Applause
  • 5:46 - 5:54
    As I said, we didn't have this great technology the CCC brings, we had no LED and no onion routing and [...?]
  • 5:54 - 5:58
    they looked up and were like "oh there it is" and yeah and so if it would not have been for them it would have been a great disaster.
  • 5:58 - 6:01
    But anyway:
  • 6:01 - 6:11
    Without much ado I would like to present my great chief technologist to talk about the virtues and pleasures of pneumatic transfer.
  • 6:11 - 6:13
    Thank you very much. Enjoy!
  • 6:13 - 6:18
    Applause
  • 6:19 - 6:21
    And now our crowdfunding video.
  • 6:21 - 6:25
    Just so you can go back a little bit - almost a year ago today. Thanks.
  • 6:25 - 6:29
    Video
  • 7:11 - 7:18
    Applause
  • 7:18 - 7:30
    I haven't mentioned before that it was a rather large collaborative project, we had also other versions, one that happened in italy as well - Vittore Baroni and pneumatic circus and the mail art network.
  • 7:30 - 7:38
    And we also had an offshoot in Newcastle, England, called OctoPlus, which is something I recommend you to check out online.
  • 7:38 - 7:41
    And now, without much ado, our chief technologist, Jeff Mann.
  • 7:45 - 7:46
    Jeff Mann: Hello, thank you.
  • 7:47 - 7:54
    My name is Jeff Mann, I'm an artist, I'm just one of the many people who worked on the Octo project.
  • 7:54 - 8:08
    It's a big collaborative project. But I was mostly responsible for the pneumatic systems, vacuum cleaners and tubes and so on. So, they asked me to come on stage today.
  • 8:12 - 8:21
    I'd like to talk a little bit... now they have told me I have way too many slides, so I try to go a bit quickly...
  • 8:21 - 8:33
    Technically, I like to think about technology as a system together with humans and art and so on and something that can't really be seperated.
  • 8:33 - 8:40
    I mean there has always been technology, there has always been art, as long as there have been humans.
  • 8:40 - 8:46
    It's unthinkable to have humans without art and technology.
  • 8:49 - 8:58
    And there's this huge history of art and technology influencing each other and influencing people.
  • 8:59 - 9:05
    These paintings are both French paintings, they're quite seperated in time.
  • 9:05 - 9:13
    You might think that not a lot has changed in the last 300.000 or 30.000 years.
  • 9:14 - 9:21
    Of course all the things have changed, because now we're living inside - basically - technology.
  • 9:21 - 9:29
    I mean we're completely surrounded, enclosed... we're not in the forest anymore,
  • 9:29 - 9:38
    we're in this kind of second nature, technological systems and we have a very intimate relationship with technology.
  • 9:38 - 9:47
    Some people have been talking about a new aesthetic, about seeing things through the eyes of technology.
  • 9:47 - 9:52
    But, you know, this has been happening, already for a century.
  • 9:52 - 10:03
    Technology has always not only reflected who we are, but informed and actually created who we are.
  • 10:03 - 10:22
    There is a kind of liveliness of machines and artifacts and the kind of social interaction between them that is - like I'm saying - more a kind of a holistic system.
  • 10:22 - 10:31
    So, that's kind of the... some of the things that interests me, the whole world of objects,
  • 10:31 - 10:40
    technological devices and the things that were the sort of the new forest 2.0, the savannah version 2.
  • 10:40 - 10:49
    And that sort of chaotically evolving ecosystem.
  • 10:49 - 10:56
    And the very organic... Looking at the kind of the organic nature
  • 10:56 - 11:13
    and thinking about... People could sort of commune in a way with technology in the same way people just talk about communing with nature - is that possible also in this kind of environment.
  • 11:13 - 11:17
    How does technology feel?
  • 11:17 - 11:28
    Back in the 90s, when I lived in Toronto, I started something called the art robotics group, to explore these kind of questions.
  • 11:28 - 11:41
    And specifically focusing on physical objects and interactions, not just flat point-and-click kind of screen.
  • 11:41 - 11:52
    This took place in a place called inter-access and this was a kind of proto-hackerspace, but specifically for artists.
  • 11:52 - 12:00
    I also did a series of telematic, telepresent dinner parties.
  • 12:00 - 12:06
    That's not Richard Stallman, that's {Name??} there, speaking through a talking fish.
  • 12:16 - 12:22
    During the same time I also got quite interested in these tubes...
  • 12:22 - 12:29
    ...and I was making different sorts of artworks and exploring just the nature what...
  • 12:30 - 12:35
    ...I don't really know why I was so interested in them, but they were just interesting.
  • 12:35 - 12:42
    I started connecting them with vacuum cleaner motors and these are flexible tubes,
  • 12:42 - 12:48
    so they could move around and make really interesting movements, by controlling the vacuum cleaner motor.
  • 12:48 - 12:54
    I actually had MIDI-controlled vacuum cleaner motor that I could run from the computer.
  • 12:54 - 13:00
    I built this... This is back in the late 90s.
  • 13:04 - 13:13
    This one is a sound sculpture and you might recognize these plastic drainage pipes.
  • 13:13 - 13:26
    So, exploring not so much the usefulness of these things, but imagination.
  • 13:26 - 13:33
    Like what... there is this other layer that nobody really intended to put there.
  • 13:33 - 13:41
    Nobody who designed these plastic pipes intended them to be used for anything other than draining water.
  • 13:41 - 13:45
    But, you know, they have a real personality.
  • 13:45 - 14:01
    One of the things, one of the several ideas about technology is this infinite idea of infinite progress and things just getting better and better all the time through technology.
  • 14:01 - 14:11
    And that also lets us think about technology as being a slave.
  • 14:11 - 14:15
    Just being a robot which is a check word for worker or slave.
  • 14:15 - 14:27
    And the other side of this is a very dystopian way of looking at technology and being afraid of it, escaping and getting a hold of us and taking over.
  • 14:31 - 14:35
    But technology I think can also just be more everyday and playful.
  • 14:37 - 14:43
    This was a... another of the connected... in this case a picnic and… I think we'll just skip over that actually.
  • 14:46 - 14:49
    I like to call what I do "abstract industrialism".
  • 14:51 - 15:00
    And the last few years I've been working on a project looking at all these kinds of different sorts of technologies in spaces:
  • 15:01 - 15:03
    Ruined spaces...
  • 15:04 - 15:06
    ...things that have lost their function...
  • 15:06 - 15:07
    ...things that don't have their purpose anymore...
  • 15:07 - 15:09
    ...or their technological what they were designed for...
  • 15:09 - 15:13
    When you strip that away, there can be some really interesting things left over.
  • 15:13 - 15:18
    Very organic things, very charismatic things.
  • 15:18 - 15:25
    Spaces that you don't really know exactly what their purpose is
  • 15:25 - 15:30
    or maybe its just been forgotten - it's a kind of a dream.
  • 15:30 - 15:39
    But beautiful spaces and beautiful objects and instruments.
  • 15:39 - 15:41
    Physics labs...
  • 15:41 - 15:43
    ...even gas stations...
  • 15:43 - 15:46
    ...control rooms...
  • 15:46 - 15:50
    ...domestic situations...
  • 15:50 - 15:53
    and ruined spaces.
  • 15:53 - 15:55
    Cabinets and conduits...
  • 15:55 - 15:59
    air fans - I'm a big fan of fans.
  • 15:59 - 16:06
    I can't sleep at night, I have to have an electric fan on at night, or I can't sleep.
  • 16:06 - 16:12
    Machines of all sorts... and of course these incredible networks of pipes
  • 16:14 - 16:28
    So the telekommunisten collective was invited by Transmediale to produce the Octo project for "Back When Pluto Was A Planet" version of Transmediale.
  • 16:29 - 16:33
    And Dmitri Kleiner invited me to collaborate.
  • 16:41 - 16:49
    It was based on the idea of the Rohrpost... This was something we'd all been interested, we'd all been talking about it.
  • 16:49 - 16:57
    Telekommunisten used to have an office in the Telegraphamt in Berlin and in the cellar was this reminiscent of the Berlin Rohrpostsystem.
  • 16:57 - 17:05
    Again very beautiful things - even though they are not functioning anymore.
  • 17:05 - 17:23
    We also looked at... because of "Back When Pluto Was A Planet" theme, looking back over the last, say, 100 years and different sorts of designs were part of the inspiration.
  • 17:23 - 17:33
    Jonas came up with this great video which we have seen. I'll just jump over that.
  • 17:35 - 17:36
    Laughter
  • 17:37 - 17:42
    I had a lot to live up to after this wonderful video and this is what I came up with.
  • 17:42 - 17:53
    This is the very first version of the central processing unit of the Octo packet controller system.
  • 17:53 - 17:58
    We demonstrated that... it went over very well.
  • 17:58 - 18:04
    We were able to... we discovered we could send cans of beer! Applause
  • 18:04 - 18:10
    We did some purely tests - up the windows, cans of beer, up two stories.
  • 18:13 - 18:18
    And along we went on the search for different sorts of capsules that would work,
  • 18:18 - 18:22
    the proper vacuum cleaners...
  • 18:22 - 18:26
    I see you went with the yellow one... We kind of went with the silver Shop Vac.
  • 18:26 - 18:28
    That's really good.
  • 18:28 - 18:36
    So we got to work on creating a little bit better looking field... We put them in little sketches here,
  • 18:36 - 18:46
    but it started to shape up into something based on all these kind of images of technology.
  • 18:49 - 19:00
    The end stations were designed and produced by raumlabor, the architecture agency who helped immensely putting together the installation.
  • 19:02 - 19:11
    This was my more or less final design for the central unit PC71 - is that right? P7CP...
  • 19:11 - 19:22
    And this also took a litte bit of inspiration from the place itself, the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, where the Transmediale is held.
  • 19:22 - 19:28
    On the right there... really interesting, kind of modernist, midcentury design.
  • 19:28 - 19:32
    Also, the life guard station on the left.
  • 19:32 - 19:40
    And so we proceeded to install these yellow tubes everywhere in HKW.
  • 19:40 - 19:55
    And it was quite a - well... as you guys, I guess, know, quite a lot of work installing the central unit, hooking up everything...
  • 19:55 - 20:03
    Our system was very centalized and you can hear more about the ideas behind that at the workshop tomorrow.
  • 20:03 - 20:09
    We had to make some last minute modifications due to air flow problems,
  • 20:09 - 20:13
    but basically it all sort of came together pretty well.
  • 20:13 - 20:17
    And... here we are.
  • 20:17 - 20:22
    And it worked... just run through these, almost done...
  • 20:22 - 20:30
    And... great volunteers, great everyone helping this around our endstations.
  • 20:30 - 20:41
    And... of course the {...?} project that, see, you mentioned was an excellent, was a great addition to the whole thing.
  • 20:41 - 20:48
    And we had some really beautiful capsules that were works of art sent through the system.
  • 20:48 - 20:53
    There were also telephones to communicate with the central station, to take care of the routing.
  • 20:53 - 21:00
    This is Dmitri Kleiner and Baruch Gottlieb...
  • 21:00 - 21:06
    They'll be talking for the telekommunisten at the workshop tomorrow.
  • 21:06 - 21:10
    I encourage you to come, because there is lots more to say about Octo and the story behind it
  • 21:10 - 21:14
    and we really are looking for investors.
  • 21:14 - 21:16
    Thanks.
  • 21:16 - 21:24
    Applause
  • 21:30 - 21:38
    *M: Tja, das Finanzierungskonzept für Octo ist ja leider, leider gescheitert.
  • 21:38 - 21:42
    Und deswegen haben sich die Telekommunisten entschieden, das Werk Open Source zu stellen.
  • 21:45 - 21:49
    Applause
  • 21:50 - 21:58
    Und der Grund, weswegen Jeff so weit ausgeholt hat und mit Kunst angefangen hat,
  • 21:59 - 22:06
    war, dass das ganze tatsächlich auch einen künstlerischen, konzeptionellen Hintergrund hat - nämlich Open Art.
  • 22:06 - 22:11
    Also Open Art ist das Prinzip Open Source angewendet auf Kunst,
  • 22:11 - 22:22
    sprich: das Konzept wird sozusagen zur Technologie, zur Infrastruktur und damit auch zum Hacking-Tool bzw. zum hackbaren Tool.
  • 22:23 - 22:27
    Octo war sozusagen die Version 1.0.
  • 22:27 - 22:36
    Und Seidenstraße, wie ihr sie heute seht, ist die Version 2.0 Beta.
  • 22:36 - 22:44
    Applaus
  • 22:44 - 22:49
    Frank: Also Beta deswegen, weil es da noch Einiges zu tun gibt - da kommen wir gleich drauf.
  • 22:49 - 22:51
    Die wesentlichen Unterschiede
  • 22:51 - 22:55
    (ich benutze übrigens dieses Mikrophon deswegen, weil der Stream sonst kein Audio hat)
  • 22:55 - 22:58
    Die wesentlichen Unterschiede - wie ihr gesehen habt - ist,
  • 22:58 - 23:05
    das System der Telekommunisten, das Octo-System, war ja mehr an der Idee einer zentralen Telko orientiert.
  • 23:05 - 23:09
    Also es gab eine Switching Station und alle Rohre gingen da hin.
  • 23:09 - 23:14
    *M: Genau, also man hat sozusagen die Zentrale angerufen per Telefon und gesagt:
  • 23:14 - 23:23
    "Zentrale, ich möchte bitte verbunden werden mit Station ..." und dann wurde wie beim Anfang des Telefons umgesteckt.
  • 23:23 - 23:30
    Und bei uns ist das eher... wir bauen sozusagen das alte Internet nach.
  • 23:31 - 23:42
    Frank: Also die Idee ist halt, es gibt ein dezentralisiertes Mesh-Network, durchaus auch geboren aus der Not dieses Gebäudes heraus, weil es einfach viel zu viele Brandschutzzonen aufweist.
  • 23:44 - 23:48
    Brandschutzzone heißt: da sind so Türen, da darfst du kein Rohr durchlegen
  • 23:48 - 23:49
    - was ein bisschen doof ist...
  • 23:49 - 23:55
    Deswegen gibt es häufiger Stationen, die in der Nähe von Brandschutztüren sind, und zwar links und rechts davon
  • 23:55 - 23:58
    und dazwischen muss man manuell rübertragen.
  • 23:58 - 23:59
    Lachen
  • 23:59 - 24:02
    *M: Da kommen wir aber nochmal drauf zurück, wie man das macht.
  • 24:02 - 24:06
    Frank: Ihr erinnert euch noch so an die Mailbox-Zeiten mit Store and Forward?
  • 24:08 - 24:10
    Da sind wir jetzt so ungefähr.
  • 24:11 - 24:17
    Applaus
  • 24:18 - 24:23
    Es gibt ja so ein Adressierungsschema, was Routingprotokoll-geeignet ist.
  • 24:23 - 24:26
    Wir haben aber noch keinen automatischen Router.
  • 24:26 - 24:34
    Also, wir denken so... naja, dieses Jahr Seidenstraße 2.0 Beta, nächstes Jahr vielleicht 2.0
  • 24:34 - 24:41
    und zum Camp können wir dann 3.0 machen, mit automatischen Routern und ein paar mehr Kilometern - war so die Idee.
  • 24:41 - 24:47
    Das heißt, das Konzept ist darauf angelegt, dass es viel größer sein kann, als es jetzt hier ist.
  • 24:47 - 24:50
    Deswegen sind auch ein paar Sachen ein bisschen overengineered,
  • 24:50 - 24:54
    wie z.B. unser Routing- und Adressing-Scheme.
  • 24:54 - 24:58
    Das Netzwerk entwickelt sich dynamisch,
  • 24:58 - 25:00
    d.h. es kommen Stationen dazu, es fallen Stationen weg,
  • 25:01 - 25:05
    manche Stationen sind laggy, wenn niemand Bock hat, eine Kapsel von links nach rechts zu stecken,
  • 25:05 - 25:10
    Andere werden populärer sein, weil sie populäre Dienste anbieten zum Beispiel.
  • 25:12 - 25:16
    Lachen
  • 25:18 - 25:23
    Das Signaling ist ad-hoc, d.h. es gibt zwei Modi:
  • 25:23 - 25:27
    Der eine ist, wenn man weiß, dass da jemand ist, der ein DECT-Telefon hat.
  • 25:27 - 25:31
    Der Andere ist, wir haben In-Band-Signaling, wenn man nämlich in dieses Rohr reinruft...
  • 25:31 - 25:41
    Lachen und Applaus
  • 25:40 - 25:44
    *M: Wie dynamisch dieses Netzwerk ist, haben wir ja gerade gesehen,
  • 25:44 - 25:50
    wir haben gerade hier einen Anschluss reingelegt bekommen...
  • 25:50 - 25:57
    Insofern können wir euch auch gleich zeigen, wie es funktioniert und dass es funktioniert.
  • 25:59 - 26:06
    Während Frank hier am Vorbereiten ist, kann ich euch noch ein Video zeigen...
  • 26:07 - 26:10
    Ach, Frank ist schneller. Na gut.
  • 26:11 - 26:13
    Also, ganz wichtig:
  • 26:13 - 26:20
    Beleuchtung. Das ist auch ein neues Feature und das macht das Debugging wesentlich einfacher,
  • 26:21 - 26:25
    weil man die steckengebliebenen Kapseln auch wiederfindet.
  • 26:25 - 26:28
    In den Anschluss rein, bisschen nach vorne schieben und... Surrrr
  • 26:28 - 26:50
    Lachen und Applaus
  • 26:50 - 26:58
    Frank steckt jetzt im Staubsauger auf Saugfunktion um...
  • 26:58 - 27:06
    Könnt ihr mal das Licht ausmachen? Danke.
  • 27:08 - 27:24
    Surrr ... Lachen und Applaus
  • 27:33 - 27:37
    Problematisch sind natürlich jetzt so enge Biegeradien,
  • 27:37 - 27:41
    aber wir haben das tatsächlich in der aufgerollten (also so wie geliefert) Rolle probiert
  • 27:41 - 27:43
    und das funktioniert auch.
  • 27:43 - 27:46
    Also muss man ab und zu ein bisschen dagegentreten, aber…
  • 27:47 - 27:49
    Lachen
  • 27:51 - 27:53
    Ja, Frank hat ja jetzt schon gezeigt, wie es prinzipiell geht.
  • 27:53 - 27:59
    Normalerweise möchte man dann natürlich auch eine Adresse auf der Kapsel haben.
  • 27:59 - 28:04
    Insofern schaut ihr euch das Routingfile an,
  • 28:04 - 28:08
    das... noch auf der Todo-Liste steht.
  • 28:08 - 28:10
    Lachen
  • 28:10 - 28:14
    Frank: Eines der Dinge, wie gesagt, das ist ein dynamisches evolvierendes Netzwerk,
  • 28:14 - 28:18
    d.h. also das Routingfile zu machen ist eine kontinuierliche Aufgabe.
  • 28:18 - 28:22
    Es gibt jetzt eins, was irgendwie der Realität so grob entspricht,
  • 28:22 - 28:27
    was aber noch weiter ergänzt werden muss und sich auch noch weiter entwickeln wird.
  • 28:27 - 28:32
    *M: Also, an sich ist... Sozusagen die erste Stelle ist der switching node,
  • 28:32 - 28:40
    also die Stelle die mehrere Anschlüsse hat, wo jemand sitzt und dann jeweils die Kapseln vermittelt
  • 28:40 - 28:45
    und die zweite Stelle ist der Endpunkt, also die Stelle wo es dann konkret hin soll.
  • 28:45 - 28:48
    Also wie bei jedem Netzwerk, ziemlich standardmäßig.
  • 28:48 - 28:51
    Der Grund, warum es Doppelpunkte sind, ist übrigens IPv6.
  • 28:51 - 28:56
    Lachen und Applaus
  • 28:56 - 28:58
    Frank: Ihr seht schon, wir haben da eine bisschen größere Skalierung so im Kopf.
  • 28:58 - 29:00
    Lachen
  • 29:00 - 29:07
    *M: Es wird natürlich an Tag 4 auch den Infrastructure-Review geben, mit dem SOC-Bericht.
  • 29:07 - 29:10
    Sebastian arbeitet da gerade an einem Zählrohr
  • 29:10 - 29:17
    und als Backup wollen wir aber - und um das zu überprüfen, ob das auch alles funktioniert - wollen wir auch eine Strichliste führen.
  • 29:17 - 29:25
    Sprich: Für jede Kapsel, die man losschickt, macht man einen Strich an dem Punkt, wo man sie losschickt.
  • 29:25 - 29:30
    Dann gibt es prinzipiell drei Möglichkeiten.
  • 29:30 - 29:31
    Und zwar erstens:
  • 29:31 - 29:40
    Wenn man keinen Staubsauger hat, dann bringt man die Kapsel bis zum nächsten Punkt, der einen Staubsauger hat und schickt sie da los.
  • 29:40 - 29:42
    Zweite Möglichkeit:
  • 29:42 - 29:45
    Man kann sich einen Staubsauger leihen gehen.
  • 29:45 - 29:52
    Da muss man natürlich aufpassen, wenn da gerade eine Kapsel im Rohr ankommen will, dann kann das zu Kollisionen kommen.
  • 29:52 - 29:53
    Die dritte Möglichkeit ist:
  • 29:53 - 30:05
    Den nächsten Switching Node anzurufen - wir haben da ja jede Menge Möglichkeiten: DECT, VoIP oder... Pause
  • 30:05 - 30:09
    Frank: ...oder eben besagtes In-Band-Signaling.
  • 30:09 - 30:23
    Lachen und Applaus
  • 30:23 - 30:28
    *M: Ping ist okay, Echo funktioniert! Großartig.
  • 30:28 - 30:30
    Lachen
  • 30:34 - 30:40
    Die Signalisierung - wie man weiß, dass die Kapsel angekommen ist und man aufhören kann zu pusten -
  • 30:40 - 30:48
    funktioniert so: Wenn man am anderen Ende dann jemand, der die Kapsel rausnimmt, den Deckel aufs Rohr tut,
  • 30:48 - 30:53
    dann ploppt der nämlich beim Anderen an der anderen Seite raus.
  • 30:53 - 30:57
    Frank: Wir saugen halt in der Regel nicht, sondern wir pushen,
  • 30:57 - 30:59
    wenn wir einen Staubsauger haben.
  • 30:59 - 31:01
    Wenn keiner da ist, muss man auf der anderen Seite rufen, dass gesaugt wird.
  • 31:01 - 31:05
    In jedem Falle dann halt einfach den Deckel drauf machen, dann weiß man,
  • 31:05 - 31:10
    dass, wenn man gedrückt hat, dann ploppt der Deckel auf, wenn die Kapsel da war
  • 31:10 - 31:14
    und dann kann man sehen, dass der Andere die Kapsel erhalten hat.
  • 31:16 - 31:22
    *M: Damit das Ganze funktioniert, muss man natürlich die Kapseln forwarden, die man findet.
  • 31:22 - 31:28
    Also sprich: Wenn ihr eine Kapsel findet, schaut drauf, wo sie hin soll,
  • 31:28 - 31:34
    schaut, wie sie geroutet werden soll, weil wir ja leider noch keine automatischen Router haben,
  • 31:34 - 31:39
    und dann wieder ins Rohr und pushen.
  • 31:39 - 31:54
    Das ist der momentane Netzplan... wie gesagt, der ändert sich auch noch, so laufend.
  • 31:54 - 32:02
    Wir haben hier eine Außenstrecke zur Halle H hoch
  • 32:02 - 32:06
    und eine Außenstrecke, die noch nicht angeschlossen ist.
  • 32:06 - 32:12
    Die geht von ganz oben außen an der Fassade lang - ist die, die ihr wahrscheinlich schon gesehen habt - runter in die Eingangshalle,
  • 32:12 - 32:15
    die ist noch nicht angeschlossen.
  • 32:15 - 32:18
    Das wäre dann noch so ein Projekt.
  • 32:18 - 32:23
    Der Grund warum wir so wenig Oben-Unten-Verbindungen haben, ist tatsächlich der Brandschutz.
  • 32:23 - 32:27
    Außerdem sind hier die Stellen eingetragen, wo man hand-vermitteln muss.
  • 32:27 - 32:30
    Also sprich die Kapseln von einer Station zur anderen tragen.
  • 32:30 - 32:36
    Zum Beispiel das Erdgeschossfoyer, das ist hermetisch abgeriegelt durch Brandschutztüren.
  • 32:36 - 32:42
    Ebenso Saal 3, da haben wir eine ganz lustige Lösung gefunden über die alte Regie
  • 32:42 - 32:49
    vom Rang geht es dann runter und wir haben da extra eine Kernbohrung dafür erweitern lassen...
  • 32:49 - 32:55
    Lachen und Applaus
  • 32:55 - 32:59
    Frank: Also ihr seht schon, so Infrastuktur muss man auch richtig betreiben
  • 32:59 - 33:04
    und da lassen wir uns auch nicht von Betonwänden aufhalten! Lachen
  • 33:04 - 33:09
    *M: Genau... und die Handvermittlung, das soll dann so gehen,
  • 33:09 - 33:14
    dass wenn man eine Kapsel findet, dass dann auf dem Boden
  • 33:14 - 33:17
    - das müssen wir auch noch machen - Lachen
  • 33:17 - 33:22
    weißes Gaffer aufgeklebt ist, das den Weg zur nächsten Station anzeigt.
  • 33:22 - 33:26
    Und dann sendet man die Kapsel einfach von dort aus weiter.
  • 33:28 - 33:34
    [Slide: man in the middle attack] Lachen
  • 33:42 - 33:48
    Auch die Seidenstraße hat also mit Angriffen von bösen Hackern zu kämpfen...
  • 33:48 - 33:54
    Hier zu sehen eine Man-in-the-middle-Attack mit Säge und Staubsauger.
  • 33:54 - 34:02
    Frank: Allerdings, wir sind ja auch immer für Sicherheitsmaßnahmen in unseren Netzwerken zu haben
  • 34:02 - 34:06
    und haben da auch eine akustische Methode der Detektion entwickelt:
  • 34:06 - 34:11
    Ob jemand da mit einer Säge zugange ist, das macht nämlich ein mordsmäßiges Geräusch, was sich durch das ganze Rohr fortpflanzt...
  • 34:11 - 34:13
    Lachen
  • 34:13 - 34:17
    Also wenn jemand an der Leitung sägt, dann hört man das. Lachen
  • 34:17 - 34:25
    Dummerweise kam uns jetzt gerade zu Ohren, dass es auch noch fortgeschrittene Attacken gibt - mit heißen Drähten... Lachen
  • 34:25 - 34:34
    *M: Die lassen sich natürlich nicht mit einem Mikrofon detektieren. Da arbeiten wir noch an einer Lösung.
  • 34:34 - 34:35
    Frank: Ja genau, Laufzeitanalyse wäre natürlich auch noch eine Option.
  • 34:35 - 34:38
    Leider schwankt die Laufzeit ein bisschen mit dem Kapselgewicht.
  • 34:38 - 34:43
    Wir haben so etwas zwischen 3 und 6 Metern pro Sekunde,
  • 34:43 - 34:47
    also Kapselgewicht und Stärke des Staubsaugers.
  • 34:47 - 34:53
    Je dicker der Staubsauger ist, desto schneller natürlich die Kapsel und je leichter die Kapsel ist desto schneller ist sie auch.
  • 34:53 - 34:56
    *M: Wobei, dicke Staubsauger…?
  • 34:56 - 35:02
    Wir haben hier auch noch einen weiteren Attackvector, nämlich Denial of Service-Attack.
  • 35:02 - 35:05
    Lachen
  • 35:05 - 35:12
    Das funktioniert natürlich grundsätzlich, wenn man ans andere Rohrende pustet und da einfach Druck macht, dann ist die Seidenstraße lahmgelegt.
  • 35:15 - 35:22
    Frank: Also wir befinden uns hier gerade im Status, wo wir so ein "We are all friends here"-Network betreiben. Lachen
  • 35:22 - 35:25
    So ähnlich wie SS7 bei den Telcos, ihr kennt das ja.
  • 35:25 - 35:32
    *M: Was wir allerdings jetzt schon sagen können: Wir haben mehr Bandbreite als das NOC.
  • 35:32 - 35:41
    Lachen und Applaus
  • 35:41 - 35:45
    Und zwar haben wir auch tatsächlich eine kürzere Latenz,
  • 35:45 - 35:55
    weil: die 100 GBit-Leitung, die wir hier stehen haben, braucht 80 Sekunden für 1 TB.
  • 35:55 - 35:59
    Da sind wir schneller, und zwar über alle Strecken. Lachen
  • 35:59 - 36:01
    Frank: Also allen Strecken, die wir verlegt haben.
  • 36:01 - 36:03
    Lachen
  • 36:07 - 36:11
    *M: Falls ihr jetzt selber so eine Kapsel bauen wollt,
  • 36:11 - 36:16
    mit vielleicht... wo noch mehr Daten reinpassen oder whatever,
  • 36:16 - 36:22
    gibt es die schnelle und billige Möglichkeit mit einer 1,5 Liter PET-Flasche
  • 36:22 - 36:23
    - die passt genau da rein.
  • 36:23 - 36:25
    Die schneidet man an zwei Stellen auf,
  • 36:25 - 36:26
    nimmt den Mittelteil raus,
  • 36:28 - 36:30
    kann dann die Nachricht reintun,
  • 36:30 - 36:34
    am besten auch einen LED-Throwie gleich reinwerfen, dann hat man auch die Beleuchtung gelöst.
  • 36:34 - 36:39
    Dann so ein bisschen eindrücken, dass man das untere Teil ins obere Teil stecken kann
  • 36:39 - 36:42
    und dann nochmal zur Sicherheit mit Tape umwickeln.
  • 36:42 - 36:48
    Adresse drauf und dann geht man am besten zur Teststrecke.
  • 36:48 - 36:53
    Die ist in Saal 3, und zwar hinten rechts neben dem Radom.
  • 36:54 - 36:58
    Betrieben von Chaos in Kaiserslautern und CCCFFM.
  • 37:00 - 37:03
    Genau, das ist so eine PET-Flasche.
  • 37:03 - 37:09
    Hier, also die gerundeten Ecken sind wichtig, damit es nicht steckenbleibt.
  • 37:09 - 37:15
    Gewicht... so ungefähr 500 Gramm geht auf jeden Fall.
  • 37:15 - 37:19
    Es gab aber auch schon Tests mit einem Laubbläser, der schafft 1 kg.
  • 37:19 - 37:20
    Lachen
  • 37:20 - 37:23
    Also eine volle 1 Liter Wasserflasche.
  • 37:24 - 37:28
    Maße sind ungefähr 85mm plus/minus ein paar Millimeter,
  • 37:28 - 37:32
    mal ungefähr 180 - das ist so die Obergrenze.
  • 37:32 - 37:36
    Das kommt ein bisschen darauf an. Mit gerundeten Ecken funktioniert es besser.
  • 37:36 - 37:39
    Hier fehlt natürlich das Wichtigste...
  • 37:40 - 37:45
    Frank: Genau. Also alle Kapseln, die wir transportieren wollen im Seidenstraßen-Netzwerk, müssen beleuchtet sein.
  • 37:45 - 37:49
    Ihr habt gesehen warum: Zum Einen, es sieht einfach viel cooler aus,
  • 37:49 - 37:51
    Lachen
  • 37:51 - 37:53
    zum Anderen hilft es beim Debugging.
  • 37:53 - 37:55
    Also wenn man doch mal einen Kurvenradius zu eng gewählt hat
  • 37:55 - 37:58
    oder eine Kapsel stecken bleibt, weil sie zu scharfe Ecken hat oder zu schwer ist,
  • 37:58 - 38:02
    dann sieht man einfach, wo sie hängen bleibt - ohne Beleuchtung hat man keine Chance.
  • 38:02 - 38:08
    Das heißt also: Definitiv immer eine schöne fette LED reintun, einen Throwie.
  • 38:08 - 38:13
    Oder irgendwas, was dazu führt, dass man eine Kapsel lokalisieren kann, wenn sie in einem Rohr hängen bleibt.
  • 38:16 - 38:21
    *M: Das hier ist die Deluxe-Version aus dem Proto-Netz,
  • 38:21 - 38:32
    3D-gedruckt in einem 24-Stunden Druckgang aus Glow-in-the-Dark-Filament. Lachen
  • 38:32 - 38:35
    Da sind unten Spraycans drin
  • 38:35 - 38:41
    und das sollte eigentlich so funktionieren, dass wenn man die Spraycan reinmacht,
  • 38:41 - 38:44
    dass das Licht dann automatisch angeht.
  • 38:45 - 38:51
    Und natürlich ist auch das Open Source.
  • 38:51 - 38:56
    Und ihr könnt euch die Daten runterladen und nachbauen. Danke protofAlk.
  • 38:57 - 39:01
    Applaus
  • 39:04 - 39:09
    In der Teststrecke bekommt ihr auch euer C5-Zertifikat.
  • 39:10 - 39:16
    Chaos Communication Congress Certified Capsule. Lachen
  • 39:17 - 39:23
    Alle Kapseln müssen natürlich zertifiziert sein - das Zertifikat gibt es beim Seidenstraßen-Assembly, wo die Teststrecke ist.
  • 39:29 - 39:34
    Frank: Ja. Ganz wichtig: Keine Mate-Flaschen. Lachen
  • 39:34 - 39:45
    So... wirklich, wer da eine volle Mate-Flasche oder eine andere Glasflasche reinsteckt, muss das Rohr hinterher auslecken. Lachen
  • 39:45 - 39:47
    Auch wenn Scherben drin sind.
  • 39:47 - 39:49
    So, da kennen wir kein Spaß.
  • 39:49 - 39:53
    Wirklich: Plastikflaschen - alles prima. Keine Glasflaschen.
  • 39:53 - 39:57
    Die Sauerei ist elendig und wenn es kaputt geht, dann haben wir am anderen Ende...
  • 39:57 - 40:02
    Also die Kapseln entwickeln einen ordentlichen Speed... ihr habt es gesehen. Wenn die da rauskommen,
  • 40:02 - 40:05
    das ist leider ein unkalkulierbares Risiko.
  • 40:05 - 40:09
    Also bitte wirklich keine Glasflaschen und schon gar keine vollen Glasflaschen.
  • 40:13 - 40:16
    *M: Die TODO-Liste ist noch lang...
  • 40:16 - 40:24
    Wir haben zum Beispiel geplant, eine Spirale zu legen, wo man durchlaufen kann, für die Eingangshalle,
  • 40:24 - 40:29
    wo dann auch der Anschluss von oben, von den Coffee Nerds aus dem 4. Stock, runterkommt.
  • 40:29 - 40:38
    Die Routingprotokolle und die Adressierung stehen noch nicht final, bzw. ändern sich natürlich auch ständig.
  • 40:38 - 40:50
    Aber: Baut mehr Kapseln, sendet Sachen, sendet Nachrichten, probiert's aus, benutzt das Netzwerk.
  • 40:53 - 41:01
    Ja... Dann würde ich jetzt noch um einen ganz fetten Applaus bitten... und zwar für Pat,
  • 41:01 - 41:05
    Applaus
  • 41:12 - 41:14
    für Tim,
  • 41:19 - 41:21
    für Tec,
  • 41:21 - 41:24
    für das ganze Raumfahrtlabor,
  • 41:24 - 41:33
    für [?], für CCCFFM, für Chaos in Kaiserslautern,
  • 41:33 - 41:35
    für Moritz,
  • 41:35 - 41:37
    für Oskar,
  • 41:37 - 41:40
    für die Haus..[?] vor allem hier,
  • 41:40 - 41:47
    für die Techniker im CCH, die das überhaupt erst möglich gemacht haben, die uns mit den Brandschutztüren geholfen haben,
  • 41:50 - 41:55
    für die Kongress-Orga: dodger, fengel, cpunkt, [?];
  • 41:55 - 42:01
    und all die Helfer und all die Engel, ohne die das nicht möglich gewesen wäre. Und ich mein das ernst.
  • 42:01 - 42:10
    Applaus
  • 42:11 - 42:16
    Wenn ihr euch noch ansonsten beteiligen wollt - es gibt ein Wiki!
  • 42:16 - 42:22
    Hier die Short-URL: is.gd/ss30c3
  • 42:22 - 42:29
    Die Mailingliste: is.gd/ssml30c3 - auch leicht zu merken.
  • 42:29 - 42:32
    Dann möchte ich noch auf den Telekommunistenworkshop hinweisen,
  • 42:32 - 42:39
    der ist morgen um 4 Uhr nachmittags in Halle 13. Jeff hat ihn ja schon angekündigt.
  • 42:39 - 42:49
    Ja, und jetzt stehen wir für Fragen, Anregungen, Ideen usw. zur Verfügung.
  • 42:49 - 42:54
    Frank: Ja, damit wären wir sozusagen durch mit dem Vortragsteil. Jetzt habt ihr bestimmt Fragen.
  • 42:54 - 42:57
    [Q&A]
  • 42:57 - 43:00
    Frank: Tim!
  • 43:00 - 43:09
    Tim: Wäre es nicht grundsätzlich bei diesem System sinnvoll, das alles halbduplex auszulegen,
  • 43:09 - 43:14
    also immer nur eine Richtung zu bespielen und immer zwei Rohre zu verlegen?
  • 43:14 - 43:16
    Frank: Ja, im Prinzip ja.
  • 43:16 - 43:25
    Nur wir kommen da... also dieses ganze Projekt ist... also um mal ein bisschen den Skalierungsfaktor zu verdeutlichen:
  • 43:25 - 43:32
    Als ich dieses Rohr geordert habe, diese 2 km, bin ich danach so nach Hause gelaufen
  • 43:32 - 43:38
    und da fiel mir so auf: So, ich bin jetzt gerade eine halbe Stunde lang gelaufen, das waren ungefähr 2 km,
  • 43:38 - 43:44
    d.h. wir haben ungefähr eine halbe Stunde Rohr bestellt.
  • 43:44 - 43:47
    Und die müssen halt verlegt werden.
  • 43:47 - 43:55
    *M: Ich kann euch übrigens auch sehr eine Wanderung entlang der Seidenstraße empfehlen.
  • 43:55 - 43:59
    Frank: Und... also im Prinzip haben wir genug Rohr, um die wesentlichen Strecken halbduplex zu legen,
  • 43:59 - 44:05
    allerdings ist der Aufbauaufwand doch ein bisschen größer gewesen, als wir so gedacht haben.
  • 44:05 - 44:11
    Deswegen ist es momentan halt eben nicht mit Sende- und Empfangsleitung, aber die nächste Version...
  • 44:11 - 44:14
    Tim: Jaja, klar. Ich denke da über Version 3.0 nach…
  • 44:14 - 44:17
    Frank: Ja, genau. Also für 3.0 wollen wir natürlich getrennte Sende- und Empfangsleitungen haben
  • 44:17 - 44:20
    und vor allen Dingen wollen wir Full-auto-routing haben.
  • 44:20 - 44:24
    Also es gibt da schon so lustige Designs mit Linie-A-Router und Revolver-Router...
  • 44:26 - 44:30
    Also wenn ihr da Spaß dran habt so, wie gesagt: kommt in der Assembly vorbei,
  • 44:30 - 44:35
    da ist auf jeden Fall noch eine Menge zu tun, wo man echt viel Spaß haben kann.
  • 44:35 - 44:41
    Das ist auch so... eines der Kernfeatures des Projekts ist, es ist zwar ganz schön stressig, weil das echt so viel ist,
  • 44:41 - 44:43
    aber es macht zwischendurch auch immer wieder so einen Höllenspaß.
  • 44:43 - 44:46
    Und wenn man dann so eine Kapsel durchs Rohr zischen sieht...
  • 44:46 - 44:52
    Tim: Wenn Maschinenbauer bisher das Gefühl hatten, sie könnten mit dem Kongress nichts anfangen, hat sich das jetzt glaube ich geändert.
  • 44:52 - 44:58
    Applaus
  • 44:58 - 45:04
    *M: Mir sind gerade noch ein paar Leute eingefallen, die ich noch gar nicht erwähnt hatte, bei denen ich mich vergessen habe zu bedanken!
  • 45:04 - 45:05
    Lachen
  • 45:05 - 45:13
    Nee, die Aufbaukoordinatoren natürlich. Also Julien, Ion, Julius, [?].
  • 45:13 - 45:15
    Applaus
  • 45:15 - 45:19
    Und Onion Routing habe ich vergessen.
  • 45:19 - 45:22
    Onion Routing prinzipiell geht natürlich so:
  • 45:22 - 45:24
    Man muss 3 Hops-Punkte haben.
  • 45:24 - 45:29
    Also drei Punkte, wo man weiter geroutet, weiter vermittelt wird.
  • 45:29 - 45:34
    Es gibt da ein Konzept für eine Low-Tech Version.
  • 45:34 - 45:39
    Da würde man sozusagen die finale Adresse ganz unten drauf schreiben,
  • 45:39 - 45:44
    Dadrüber den nächsten Switching Node mit undurchsichtigem Maler-Krepp
  • 45:44 - 45:45
    usw. usf. Sodass jede Station den ersten Layer abpeelt.
  • 45:45 - 45:56
    Das schützt natürlich nicht davor, dass jemand alle Layer abpeelt und sie danach wieder draufklebt.
  • 45:56 - 46:00
    Deswegen gibt es da verschiedene Lösungen.
  • 46:00 - 46:06
    Also es war zum Beispiel Siegellack im Gespräch...
  • 46:06 - 46:12
    Damit würde man zumindest erkennen, wenn die Kapsel aufgebrochen wurde.
  • 46:12 - 46:15
    Aber auch das löst natürlich nicht das Verschlüsselungsproblem.
  • 46:15 - 46:18
    Aber da ist Wetter auf eine Idee gekommen.
  • 46:21 - 46:26
    Frank: Ja die Idee ist quasi, das Onion Routing, wie wir es aus Tor kennen, zu implementieren,
  • 46:26 - 46:28
    indem jede Station einen Schlüssel hat
  • 46:28 - 46:31
    und man verschlüsselt einfach nur für die jeweilige Station die nächste Adresse
  • 46:31 - 46:35
    sodass sie nicht die übernächste Adresse entschlüsseln kann.
  • 46:35 - 46:39
    Also quasi die Verbindung von Digitalem und Analogem.
  • 46:39 - 46:47
    Noch eine Idee war, ein Display auf die Kartuschen zu tun, sodass die Kapsel sagt, wo sie hin will und sich das beliebig ändern kann.
  • 46:47 - 46:52
    Und Sensoren in die Kapsel einzubauen, sodass sie merken, wenn sie an einer Station angekommen sind
  • 46:52 - 46:57
    und erst dann ihre Adresse, also ihre nächste Adresse anzeigen.
  • 46:57 - 47:01
    Und noch eine Idee war, diesen... so eine Labyrinthdose zu bauen, also so eine Puzzledose.
  • 47:01 - 47:04
    *M: Genau, das ist dann halt für die Verschlüsselung.
  • 47:04 - 47:07
    Frank: Also, das ist mehr Verschleierung! Aber naja...
  • 47:07 - 47:13
    Also ihr seht, da ist noch eine ganze Menge Luft für Spaß und Spiel zu haben.
  • 47:13 - 47:19
    Wie gesagt, das ist ein Beta-Projekt. Wenn jemand tolle Ideen hat, dann kommt zum Assembly und macht sie einfach.
  • 47:19 - 47:25
    Es gibt da noch genügend Spaßpotential.
  • 47:27 - 47:29
    Q: Eigentlich zwei Fragen.
  • 47:29 - 47:32
    Punkt A: Gibt es schon ein RFC? Lachen
  • 47:32 - 47:35
    Punkt B: Könntet ihr die Adressierung vielleicht nochmal ganz kurz erläutern?
  • 47:35 - 47:38
    Frank: Das RFC entsteht im Wiki.
  • 47:38 - 47:41
    Es gibt also sozusagen kein offizielles, aber es wäre natürlich eine gute Idee eins zu schreiben
  • 47:41 - 47:50
    und die Adressierung funktioniert so: Es gibt Stationen, wo man davon ausgeht, dass dort jemand ist, der routen möchte.
  • 47:50 - 47:57
    Die haben also quasi die erste Ziffer oder der erste Name, also z.B. halt NOC oder Himmel oder was auch immer.
  • 47:57 - 47:59
    Die haben Nummern und einen Namen
  • 47:59 - 48:03
    und die haben Unterstationen, die über sie zu erreichen sind, also die nicht vermitteln, sondern nur einen Endpunkt haben.
  • 48:03 - 48:10
    Der optische Unterschied ist ganz einfach. Irgendwie: die Stationen, die die erste Adressierung sind, da kommen mehrere Rohre an
  • 48:10 - 48:18
    und Endpunkte kommt nur ein Rohr an, das heißt also, da kann man hin und weg schicken aber nicht woanders hinrouten.
  • 48:18 - 48:25
    *M: Ein Beispiel, wo man sich das angucken kann, ist im Übrigen Saal 3, also da ist die C-Base der Switching Node
  • 48:25 - 48:31
    und hinten das Assembly ist nur ein Endpunkt, da kommt nur ein Rohr raus.
  • 48:31 - 48:34
    Wobei, ich weiß nicht, ob sie das inzwischen geändert haben? Haben die noch eine Leitung gelegt?
  • 48:34 - 48:38
    Lachen
  • 48:38 - 48:41
    Frank: Ja, dann sind wir glaube ich mit der Zeit durch.
  • 48:41 - 48:44
    Vielen Dank fürs Zuhören und vor allen Dingen: macht bitte mit! Vielen Dank.
  • 48:44 - 48:49
    Applaus
  • 48:49 - 48:59
    subtitles created by c3subtitles.de
Title:
Video Language:
Klingon
Duration:
48:59

Klingon subtitles

Revisions Compare revisions