Return to Video

30C3: Seidenstraße

  • 0:09 - 0:09
    Also ich bin Mey, und Frank kennt ihr ja.
  • 0:19 - 0:29
    Und wir stellen euch heute die Seidenstraße vor.
  • 0:29 - 0:37
    Dem einen oder anderen ist vielleicht schon beim Reinkommen das gelbe Rohr das draußen an der Fassade hängt aufgefallen
  • 0:37 - 0:43
    Und die Frage war natürlich: Was machen wir eigentlich mit diesem Rohr?
  • 0:43 - 0:46
    Also, was soll dieses Rohr?
  • 0:46 - 0:57
    Es sind 2km davon, von denen liegen jetzt so ungefähr 1100m schon im Gebäude.
  • 0:57 - 1:01
    Einige haben auch schon gefragt, gibt es ein Wasserproblem in dem Gebäude.
  • 1:01 - 1:05
    Unerwarteter Regen, mit dem wir nicht klarkommen.
  • 1:05 - 1:07
    Nein, es handelt sich dabei um ein Netzwerk.
  • 1:07 - 1:11
    Und zwar um ein Rohrpostnetzwerk.
  • 1:11 - 1:14
    Und warum der schöne Name Seidenstraße?
  • 1:14 - 1:18
    Die Seidenstraße ist ein Netzwerk von Handelsrouten.
  • 1:18 - 1:22
    Das existiert schon ziemlich lange, es existiert auch heute immer noch.
  • 1:22 - 1:32
    In der Tat war es nie so, dass ein Kaufmann je die ganze Seidenstraße bereist hat, sondern das lief immer über Zwischenhändler.
  • 1:32 - 1:40
    Auch heute noch wird darüber geschmuggelt. Drogen gehandelt.
  • 1:40 - 1:43
    Alternative Logistiker aller Art.
  • 1:43 - 1:47
    Sicherheit war schon immer ein Problem auf der Seidenstraße.
  • 1:47 - 1:54
    Deswegen fanden wir, das ist ein guter Name für die Rohrpost.
  • 1:54 - 2:04
    Also es wurden nicht nur Güter gehandelt auf der Seidenstraße, sondern es wurde auch Kultur auf dem Weg verbreitet und Krankheiten…
  • 2:04 - 2:11
    Also all diese Probleme, die wir im Kleinen hier dann wiederfinden.
  • 2:11 - 2:18
    Und unser Netzwerk besteht also aus besagtem Drainagerohr.
  • 2:18 - 2:22
    Hier seht ihr 2km auf Rollen aufgewickelt.
  • 2:22 - 2:25
    Das sind immer so 50 Meter pro Ring.
  • 2:25 - 2:31
    Der wichtige Punkt ist, wenn ihr das zu Hause nachbauen wollt in eurem Hackerspace. Es gibt diese Drainagerohre einmal mit Löchern
  • 2:31 - 2:38
    [Gelächter]
  • 2:38 - 2:43
    und einmal ohne Löcher, das ist dann das, was ihr wollt.
  • 2:43 - 2:45
    Kosten alle genau das selbe, ungefähr einen Euro pro Meter.
  • 2:45 - 2:52
    Und für den Betrieb nutzen wir Staubsauger und zwar so Industriestaubsauger, die sowohl saugen, als auch pusten können.
  • 2:52 - 2:55
    Da vorne steht einer.
  • 2:55 - 3:06
    Also mit dem Anschluss für so ein Drainagerohr, das ist ein typisches Abwasserrohr, mit so einem Adapter und dann kann man das schön aneinanderstecken.
  • 3:06 - 3:16
    So, jetzt fragt ihr euch sicher, wie kommt man auf die Idee so eine Rohrpost mit einem Drainagerohr zu betreiben.
  • 3:16 - 3:26
    Und in der Tat war das nicht unsere Idee, sondern das gab es schonmal, nämlich dieses Jahr auf der Transmediale im Haus der Kulturen der Welt.
  • 3:26 - 3:35
    Und zwar haben die Telekommunisten sich das ausgedacht, es hieß Octo, aber da werden sie euch gleich selber etwas darüber erzählen.
  • 3:35 - 3:39
    Für die Telekommunisten haben wir hier Diani Barreto und Jeff Mann.
  • 3:39 - 3:48
    [Applaus]
  • 3:51 - 3:53
    Hello Hamburg
  • 3:53 - 3:53
    we're absolutely delighted to be here.
  • 3:56 - 4:07
    It has been an very crazy year and it all started at Haus der Kulturen der Welt with our largest project, most [...?] {composite?} project to date
  • 4:07 - 4:17
    and it was one kilometer of tubing you did just saw and I came in last night and I was hearing this wrrrr-srrrr, I was so happy with it, a wonderful flashback.
  • 4:17 - 4:28
    I'd like to thank the CCC for inviting us here and Mey Lean Kronemanns inspiration and having invited us this year that's really great honour
  • 4:28 - 4:33
    and we're really flattered and to see how this new and improved version of Octo – you know,
  • 4:33 - 4:37
    distributed open-source, open-hardware and really gets better.
  • 4:37 - 4:42
    This was the original capsule as you can see, the little cardboard there.
  • 4:42 - 4:45
    And now we have 3D technology. Really nice.
  • 4:45 - 4:47
    That was our original intention.
  • 4:47 - 4:53
    We failed in our crowdfunding seedlaunch and so we were really happy to say okay wow, let's go open source.
  • 4:53 - 5:00
    So i am here to actually thank everyone, this is a kind of oscar price.
  • 5:00 - 5:10
    Thank you really much CCC, Frank Rieger, Mey, Gregor Sedlag and all the hackerspaces that worked on this
  • 5:10 - 5:21
    and for keeping the octo - the idea - alive and of course the team of Transmediale that also had the faith [chuckles] in us in bringing this very cumbersome project forward.
  • 5:21 - 5:26
    The curators Tatiana Bazzicheli and Kristoffer Gansing, I don't know if they are here today,
  • 5:26 - 5:32
    and the team at transmediale and raumlabor and serve you for helping us
  • 5:32 - 5:35
    for create the wonderful terminals and the technology involved.
  • 5:35 - 5:39
    I'd like to thank our octo brosis who are our debugging crew Applause
  • 5:47 - 5:54
    we have said we didn't had this great technology the CCC brings, we had no LED and no onion routing and [...?]
  • 5:54 - 5:58
    they looked up and "oh there it is" and yeah and so if it would not have been for them it would have been a great disaster.
  • 5:58 - 6:01
    But anyway:
  • 6:01 - 6:11
    Without much ado I would like to present my great chief technologist to talk about the virtues and pleasures of pneumatic transfer.
  • 6:11 - 6:13
    Thank you very much, enjoy!
  • 6:19 - 6:22
    And now our crowdfunding video.
  • 6:22 - 6:25
    Just so you can go back a little bit - almost a year ago today, thanks.
  • 6:25 - 6:29
    video
  • 7:11 - 7:18
    [applause]
  • 7:19 - 7:30
    I haven't mentioned before that it is a rather large collabroative project, we had also other versions, when it happened[?] in italy as well Vittore Baroni and pneumatic circus and mail art network.
  • 7:30 - 7:38
    We also had an offshoot[?] in newcastle, england called OctoPlus[?] which is something i recommend you to check out online.
  • 7:38 - 7:41
    And now, without much ado, our chief technologist, Jeff Mann.
  • 7:45 - 7:46
    Hello, thank you.
  • 7:49 - 7:49
    My name is Jeff Mann, I'm an artist, I'm just one of the many people who worked on the Octo project.
  • 7:55 - 8:08
    It's a big collaborative project. But I was mostly responsible for the pneumatic systems, vacuum cleaners and tubes and so on. So, they asked me to come on stage today.
  • 8:08 - 8:34
    I'd like to talk a litte bit - now they have told me I have way to many slides, so I try to go a bit quickly - technically I like to think about technology as a system together with humans and art and so on and something that can't really be seperated.
  • 8:34 - 8:40
    I mean there has alwas been technology, there has always been art, as long as there have been humans.
  • 8:40 - 8:46
    It's unthinkable to have humans without art and technology.
  • 8:46 - 8:58
    And there's this huge history of art and technology influencing each other and influencing people.
  • 8:59 - 9:05
    These paintings are both french paintings, they're quite seperated in time.
  • 9:06 - 9:13
    You might think that not a lot has changed in the last 300.000 or 30.000 years.
  • 9:14 - 9:19
    Of course all the things have changed, now we're living inside basically technology.
  • 9:21 - 9:40
    I mean, we're completely surrounded, enclosed, we're not in the forest anymore, we're in this kind of second nature, technological systems and we have a very intimate relationship with technology.
  • 9:41 - 9:47
    Some people have been talking about a new aesthetic, about seeing things through the eyes of technology.
  • 9:47 - 9:52
    But, you know, this is been happening for, already for a century.
  • 9:52 - 10:03
    Technology has always not only reflected who we are but informed and actually created who we are.
  • 10:03 - 10:22
    There is an kind of liveliness of machines and artifacts and the kind of social interaction between them that is like I'm saying more of a holistic system.
  • 10:22 - 10:43
    So that's kind of the, some of the things that interests me, the whole world of objects, technological devices and the things that were the sort of the new forest 2.0 the savannah version 2.
  • 10:43 - 10:49
    And that sort of chaotically evolving ecosystem.
  • 10:49 - 10:56
    And the very organic, looking at the kind of the organic nature.
  • 10:56 - 11:13
    And thinking about, people could sort of commune in a way with technology in the same way people talk about communing with nature -- is that possible also in this kind of environment.
  • 11:13 - 11:17
    How does technology feel?
  • 11:17 - 11:28
    Back in the 90s when I lived in Toronto I started something called the art robotics group, to explore this kind of questions.
  • 11:28 - 11:41
    And spectifically focusing on physical objects and interactions, not just flat point and click kind of screen.
  • 11:41 - 11:52
    This took place in a place called inter-access and this was a kind of proto hackerspace but specifically for artists.
  • 11:52 - 12:00
    I also did a series of telematic, tele-present dinner parties.
  • 12:00 - 12:06
    That's not Richard Stallman, thats {Name??} there speaking through a talking fish.
  • 12:16 - 12:22
    During the same time I also got quite interested in these tubes,
  • 12:22 - 12:22
    and I was making different sorts of artworks and exploring just the nature what
  • 12:30 - 12:35
    - I dont really know why i was so interested in them but they were just interesting.
  • 12:35 - 12:50
    I started connecting them with vacuum cleaner motors and these are flexible tubes, so they could move around and make really interesting movements, by controlling the vacuum cleaner motor.
  • 12:50 - 12:54
    I actually had MIDI-controlled vacuum cleaner motor that I could run from the computer.
  • 12:54 - 13:00
    I buit this, this is back in the late 90s.
  • 13:00 - 13:13
    This one is a sound sculpure and you might recognize these plastic drainage pipes.
  • 13:13 - 13:26
    So, exploring not so much the usefulness of these things but imagination.
  • 13:26 - 13:33
    Like what, there is this other layer that nobody really intended to put there.
  • 13:33 - 13:41
    Nobody who designed these plastic pipes intended them to be used for anything other then draining water.
  • 13:41 - 13:45
    But, you know, they have a real personality.
  • 13:45 - 14:01
    One of the things, one of the several ideas about technology is this infinte idea of infinite progress and things just getting better and better all the time through technologie.
  • 14:01 - 14:11
    And that also lets us think about technology as beeing a slave.
  • 14:11 - 14:15
    Just being a robot which is a check word for worker or slave.
  • 14:15 - 14:27
    The other side of this is very dystopian way we're looking at technology and being afraid of it, escaping and getting a hold of us and taking over.
  • 14:31 - 14:35
    But technology I think can also just be more everyday and playful.
  • 14:38 - 14:39
    This was a, another of the connected, in this case a picnic and… I think we'll just skip over that actually.
  • 14:46 - 14:49
    I like to call what I do "abstract industrialism".
  • 14:51 - 15:00
    And the last few years I've been working on a project looking at all these kinds of different sorts of technology in spaces.
  • 15:01 - 15:03
    ruined spaces
  • 15:04 - 15:06
    things that have lost their function
  • 15:06 - 15:07
    things that don't have their purpose anymore
  • 15:07 - 15:09
    their techological what they were designed for.
  • 15:09 - 15:13
    When you strip that away, there can be some really interesting things left over.
  • 15:13 - 15:18
    Very organic things, very charismatic things.
  • 15:18 - 15:27
    Spaces that you don't really know exactly what their purpose is,
  • 15:27 - 15:30
    or maybe its just been forgotten - it's kind of a dream.
  • 15:30 - 15:39
    But beautiful spaces and beautiful objects and instruments
  • 15:39 - 15:41
    physics labs
  • 15:41 - 15:43
    even gas stations
  • 15:43 - 15:46
    control rooms
  • 15:46 - 15:50
    domestic situations
  • 15:50 - 15:53
    and ruined spaces
  • 15:53 - 15:55
    cabinets and conduits
  • 15:55 - 15:57
    air fans - I'm a big fan of fans.
  • 15:57 - 16:06
    I can't sleep at night, I have to have an electric fan on at night, or I can't sleep.
  • 16:06 - 16:12
    Machines of all sorts, and of course these incredible networks of pipes
  • 16:14 - 16:28
    So the telekommunisten collective was invited by transmediale to produce the octo project for "Back When Pluto Was A Planet" version of transmediale.
  • 16:29 - 16:33
    And Dmytri Kleiner invited my to collaborate.
  • 16:41 - 16:49
    It was based on the idea of the Rohrpost, this was something we'd all been interested, we'd all been talking about it.
  • 16:49 - 16:57
    Telekommunisten used to have an office in the Telegraphamt in berlin and in the cellar was this reminiscent of the Berlin Rohrpostsystem.
  • 16:57 - 17:05
    Again very beautiful things, even though they are not functioning anymore.
  • 17:05 - 17:23
    We also looked at, because of "Back When Pluto Was A Planet" theme, looking back over the last, say, 100 years and different sorts of designs were the inspiration.
  • 17:23 - 17:33
    Jonas came up with this great video which we have seen. I'll just skip over that.
  • 17:35 - 17:36
    [laughter]
  • 17:38 - 17:42
    had a lot to live up to after this wonderful video and this is what I came up with.
  • 17:42 - 17:53
    This is the very first version of that central processing unit of the octo packet controller system.
  • 17:53 - 17:58
    We demonstrated that, it went over very well.
  • 17:58 - 18:04
    We were able to - we discovered we could send cans of beer [slight applause]
  • 18:04 - 18:06
    We did some purely tests, up the windows, cans of beer, up two stories.
  • 18:13 - 18:18
    And along we went on the search for different sorts of capsules that would work,
  • 18:18 - 18:22
    the proper vacuum cleaners,
  • 18:22 - 18:26
    I see you went with the yellow one - we kind of went with the silver Shop Vac.
  • 18:26 - 18:28
    That's really good.
  • 18:28 - 18:36
    And so we got to work on creating a little bit better looking {inaudible?}, we put them in little sketches here.
  • 18:36 - 18:46
    But it started to shape up into something based on all these kind of images of technology.
  • 18:49 - 19:00
    The end stations - these were designed and produced by raumlabor, the architecture agency who helped immensly putting together the installation.
  • 19:02 - 19:11
    This was my more or less final design for the central unit PC71- is that right P7CP...
  • 19:11 - 19:22
    And this also tooks a litte bit of inspiration from the place itself, the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, where the transmediale is held.
  • 19:22 - 19:28
    On the right there, really interesting, kind of modernist, midcentury design.
  • 19:28 - 19:32
    Also the life guard station on the left.
  • 19:32 - 19:40
    So we proceeded to install these yellow tubes everywhere in HKW.
  • 19:40 - 19:55
    It was quite a, well, as you guys, I guess, know, quite a lot of work installing the central unit, hooking up everything.
  • 19:55 - 20:03
    Our system was very centalized and you can hear more about the ideas behind that at the workshop tomorrow.
  • 20:03 - 20:09
    We had to make some last minute modifications due to air flow problems,
  • 20:09 - 20:13
    but basically it also came together pretty well.
  • 20:13 - 20:17
    And, here we are,
  • 20:17 - 20:22
    And it worked, just run through these, almost done.
  • 20:22 - 20:30
    Great volunteers, great everyone helping this around our endstations.
  • 20:30 - 20:41
    Of course the {...?} project that {...?} mentioned was an excellent, was a excelent, was a great addition to the whole thing.
  • 20:41 - 20:48
    We had some really beautiful capsules that were works of art sent through the system.
  • 20:48 - 20:53
    There were also telephones to communicate with the central station, to take care of the routing.
  • 20:53 - 21:00
    This is Dmytri Kleiner and Baruch Gottlieb
  • 21:00 - 21:06
    they'll be talking for the telekomunisten at the workshop tomorrow,
  • 21:06 - 21:10
    encourage you to come, because there is a lot more to say about octo and the story behind it
  • 21:10 - 21:14
    and we really are looking for investors.
  • 21:14 - 21:16
    Thanks.
  • 21:16 - 21:24
    [applause]
  • 21:31 - 21:38
    Tja, das Finanzierungskonzept für Octo ist ja leider, leider gescheitert.
  • 21:38 - 21:42
    Und deswegen haben sich die Telekommunisten entschieden, das Werk Open Source zu stellen.
  • 21:45 - 21:49
    [applause]
  • 21:51 - 21:58
    Und der Grund, weswegen Jeff soweit ausgeholt hat und mit Kunst angefangen hat,
  • 22:00 - 22:06
    war, dass das ganze tatsächlich auch einen künstlerischen, konzeptionellen Hintergrund hat - nämlich Open Art.
  • 22:06 - 22:11
    Also Open Art ist das Prinzip Open Source angewendet auf Kunst,
  • 22:11 - 22:22
    sprich das Konzept wird sozusagen zur Technologie, zur Infrastruktur und damit auch zum hacking-tool bzw. zum hackbaren Tool.
  • 22:22 - 22:27
    Octo war sozusagen die Version 1.0.
  • 22:27 - 22:36
    Und Seidenstraße, wie ihr sie heute seht, ist die Version 2.0 Beta.
  • 22:36 - 22:44
    [applause]
  • 22:44 - 22:51
    Also Beta deswegen weils da noch einiges zu tun gibt - da kommen wir gleich drauf.
  • 22:51 - 22:56
    Die wesentliche Unterschiede
  • 22:56 - 22:57
    (ich benutze übrigens dieses Mikrophon deswegen, weil der Stream sonst kein Audio hat)
  • 22:57 - 23:01
    Die wesentlichen Unterschiede, wie ihr gesehen habt ist,
  • 23:01 - 23:05
    das System der Telekommunisten, das octo System, war ja mehr an der Idee einer zentralen Telko orientiert.
  • 23:05 - 23:09
    Also es gab eine Switching Station und alle Rohre gingen da hin.
  • 23:09 - 23:16
    Man hat sozusagen die Zentrale angerufen per Telefon und gesagt:
  • 23:16 - 23:23
    "Zentrale, ich möchte bitte verbunden werden mit Station" und dann wurde wie beim Anfang des Telefons umgesteckt.
  • 23:23 - 23:30
    Bei uns ist das eher, wir bauen sozusagen das alte Internet nach.
  • 23:30 - 23:42
    Also die Idee ist halt, es gibt ein dezentralisiertes Mesh-Network, durchaus auch geboren aus der Not dieses Gebäudes heraus, das einfach viel zu viele Brandschutzzonen aufweist.
  • 23:44 - 23:48
    Brandschutzzone heißt, da sind so Türen, da darfst du kein Rohr durchlegen.
  • 23:48 - 23:49
    Was ein bisschen doof ist.
  • 23:49 - 23:55
    Deswegen gibts häufiger Stationen die in der Nähe von Brandschutztüren sind, und zwar links und rechts davon.
  • 23:55 - 23:58
    Und dazwischen muss man manuell rübertragen.
  • 23:58 - 23:59
    [Lachen]
  • 23:59 - 24:02
    Da kommen wir aber nochmal drauf zurück, wie man das macht.
  • 24:02 - 24:06
    Ihr erinnert euch noch so an die Mailbox-Zeiten mit Store and Forward?
  • 24:08 - 24:10
    Da sind wir jetzt so ungefähr.
  • 24:18 - 24:23
    Es gibt ja so ein Adressierungsschema, was Routingprotokoll-geeignet ist.
  • 24:23 - 24:26
    Wir haben aber noch keinen automatischen Router.
  • 24:26 - 24:34
    Also wir denken so an dieses Jahr Seidenstraße 2.0 Beta, nächstes Jahr vielleicht 2.0.
  • 24:34 - 24:41
    Und zum Camp können wir dann 3.0 machen, mit automatischen Routern und ein paar mehr Kilometern - war so die Idee.
  • 24:41 - 24:47
    Das heißt, das Konzept ist darauf angelegt, dass es viel größer sein kann, als es jetzt hier ist.
  • 24:47 - 24:50
    Deswegen sind auch ein paar Sachen ein bisschen overengineert,
  • 24:50 - 24:54
    wie z.B. unser Routing und Adressing-Scheme.
  • 24:54 - 24:58
    Das Netzwerk entwickelt sich dynamisch.
  • 24:58 - 24:58
    Das heißt es kommen Stationen dazu, es fallen Stationen weg.
  • 25:01 - 25:05
    Manche Stationen sind laggy, wenn niemand bock hat, eine Kapsel von links nach rechts zu stecken.
  • 25:05 - 25:10
    Andere werden populärer sein, weil sie populäre Dienste anbieten zum Beispiel.
  • 25:18 - 25:23
    Das Signaling ist Ad-Hoc, das heißt, es gibt zwei Modi:
  • 25:23 - 25:27
    Der eine ist, wenn man weiß, dass da jemand ist, der ein DECT-Telefon hat.
  • 25:27 - 25:31
    Der Andere ist, wir haben In-Band-Signaling, wenn man in dieses Rohr reinruft...
  • 25:31 - 25:41
    [Lachen]
  • 25:40 - 25:44
    Wie dynamisch dieses Netzwerk ist, haben wir ja gerade gesehen,
  • 25:44 - 25:50
    wir haben hier gerade hier einen Anschluss reingelegt bekommen.
  • 25:50 - 25:57
    In so fern können wir euch auch gleich zeigen, wie es funktioniert, und dass es funktioniert.
  • 25:59 - 26:06
    Während Frank hier am Vorbereiten ist, kann ich euch noch ein Video zeigen.
  • 26:07 - 26:10
    Och, Frank ist schneller, na gut.
  • 26:12 - 26:13
    Also, ganz wichtig:
  • 26:15 - 26:20
    Beleuchtung, das ist auch ein neues Feature und das macht das Debugging wesentlich einfacher
  • 26:21 - 26:25
    weil man die steckengebliebenen auch Kapseln wiederfindet.
  • 26:25 - 26:28
    In den Anschluss rein, bisschen nach vorne schieben und [Surrrr]
  • 26:28 - 26:50
    [Lachen und Applaus]
  • 26:50 - 26:58
    Frank steckt jetzt im Staubsauger auf Saugfunktion um.
  • 26:58 - 27:06
    Könnt ihr mal das Licht ausmachen? Danke.
  • 27:08 - 27:18
    [Surrr] [Lachen und Applaus]
  • 27:33 - 27:37
    Problematisch sind natürlich jetzt so enge Biegeradien,
  • 27:37 - 27:41
    aber wir haben das tatsächlich in der aufgerollten, also so wie geliefert, Rolle probiert
  • 27:41 - 27:43
    und es funktioniert auch,
  • 27:43 - 27:46
    also muss man ab und zu ein bisschen dagegentreten, aber…
  • 27:47 - 27:49
    [Lachen]
  • 27:51 - 27:53
    Ja, Frank hat ja jetzt schon gezeigt, wie es prinzipiell geht.
  • 27:53 - 27:59
    Normalerweise möchte man dann auch eine Adresse auf der Kapsel haben,
  • 27:59 - 28:04
    insofern schaut ihr euch das Routingfile an.
  • 28:04 - 28:08
    Das, ähm, noch auf der Todo-Liste steht.
  • 28:08 - 28:10
    [Lachen]
  • 28:10 - 28:15
    Eines der Dinge, wie gesagt, das ist ein dynamisches evolvierendes Netzwerk,
  • 28:15 - 28:18
    das heißt also das Routingfile zu machen ist eine kontinuierliche Aufgabe,
  • 28:18 - 28:22
    es gibt jetzt eins, was irgendwie der Realität so grob entspricht,
  • 28:22 - 28:27
    was aber noch weiter ergänzt werden muss und sich auch noch weiter entwickeln wird.
  • Not Synced
    [Es fehlt noch die folgende halbe Stunde]
Title:
30C3: Seidenstraße
Video Language:
Klingon
Duration:
48:59
  • Die zweite Hälfte muss noch abgetippt werden

  • Noch ein Hinweis: Das ist ein Mitschrift des Orginal-Tons. In der Mitte ist nen Teil Englisch.

  • So, Florob hat netter Weise den Rest abgetippt und gesynct. Ich hab grade den zweien Teil reviewt. Es muss nur noch jemand den ersten Teil (bis ca. 0:30) reviewen. Dann ist es eigentlich fertig.

German subtitles

Revisions Compare revisions