Return to Video

35C3 - Du kannst alles hacken – du darfst dich nur nicht erwischen lassen.

  • 0:00 - 0:17
    35C3 Intro music
  • 0:17 - 0:20
    Herald:
    Welcome to the next talk
  • 0:20 - 0:23
    "You Can Hack Everything -
    Just Don't Get Caught".
  • 0:23 - 0:25
    Quick survey:
    How many of you
  • 0:25 - 0:27
    have found a security loophole
  • 0:27 - 0:28
    and thought:
    "Oh shit, if I tell someone
  • 0:28 - 0:32
    then I am in deep
    that could cause problems?"
  • 0:32 - 0:34
    Put your hands up
    Who does that apply to?
  • 0:34 - 0:37
    Interjection from the audience: Camera off
    Laughter
  • 0:37 - 0:40
    Herald: Another question: How many of you
    would like to find a security
  • 0:40 - 0:45
    loophole, hands up
    Laughter
  • 0:45 - 0:49
    Alright, I hereby declare you all
    concerned parties and this talk
  • 0:49 - 0:53
    relevant for you, because many hackers
    are at some point in their career
  • 0:53 - 0:57
    confronted with this problem or
    are in the situation where they
  • 0:57 - 1:01
    have found something or got into
    something or ran into it
  • 1:01 - 1:05
    and know that if the people affected
    in this archictecture that they are inside
  • 1:05 - 1:09
    get wind of it, then there will be trouble
    it will really stir up discontent.
  • 1:09 - 1:12
    And this talk is about
    which worst case scenarios could be
  • 1:12 - 1:16
    in store for you, how to deal with it and
    best of all, how to not let yourself
  • 1:16 - 1:20
    get caught. And our speakers,
    Linus Neumann und Thorsten Schröder, are
  • 1:20 - 1:24
    experts in IT security. You probably
    know them from the PC-Wahl hack.
  • 1:24 - 1:29
    They found security vulnerabilities
    in the Bundestag voting software,
  • 1:29 - 1:32
    it's a very recommendable episode.
  • 1:32 - 1:35
    Alright, I'm talking rubbish,
    nevertheless I recommend the
  • 1:35 - 1:37
    logbuch-netzpolitik.org episode.
  • 1:37 - 1:40
    It's really worth a listen,
    especially number 228
  • 1:40 - 1:44
    "Interessierte Bürger". Now give
    a round of applause for Linus
  • 1:44 - 1:50
    Neumann und Thorsten Schröder, have fun
    Applause
  • 1:50 - 1:54
    Linus Neumann: Thank you all
    for being here. Thank you very much for
  • 1:54 - 1:58
    the warm welcome. I also liked how
    a few of you have already done your
  • 1:58 - 2:02
    first OpSec fail and outed yourself
    at the beginning. We have never
  • 2:02 - 2:06
    hacked anything, we have nothing
    to do with it. Our short talk is about
  • 2:06 - 2:11
    the topic everyone is talking about,
    hacking. We're seeing over the years that
  • 2:11 - 2:16
    many fine, young hackers are ending up
    in prison and there are a lot of risks
  • 2:16 - 2:20
    that come with hacking as a sport
    and spoil its enjoyment
  • 2:20 - 2:24
    for example something like house searches
    broken down doors, high legal fees,
  • 2:24 - 2:32
    this doesn't have to be. It's worth maybe
    thinking about how you can continue
  • 2:32 - 2:40
    as free agents.
    Because we know that hackers are
  • 2:40 - 2:44
    free agents, like artists, that get up
    in the morning and when they
  • 2:44 - 2:49
    are in the mood, they sit down
    and paint their pictures. And we want
  • 2:49 - 2:57
    you to be able to paint a lot more
    beautiful pictures. The key: OpSec
  • 2:57 - 3:00
    And that's what we want to
    talk to you about today.
  • 3:00 - 3:03
    Opsec is actually
    easy to summarise,
  • 3:03 - 3:13
    here by the way...
    beautiful, beautiful...
  • 3:13 - 3:14
    beautiful teaching material again
  • 3:14 - 3:24
    from Russia, it seems to be on their minds
    for some reason. Let's start with a
  • 3:24 - 3:31
    perfectly normal, the first computer worm:
    Pride comes before a fall,
  • 3:31 - 3:36
    that is one of the most important
    teachings in your operational security
  • 3:36 - 3:42
    Because showng off and cockiness
    will get you into trouble. And we have
  • 3:42 - 3:47
    known this since computer worms have
    existed. The first big computer worm
  • 3:47 - 3:52
    that became so international
    and incapacitated half of the internet
  • 3:52 - 3:57
    was the Morris worm,
    that exploited weak points in
  • 3:57 - 4:03
    Sendmail, Finger, Remote SH and a few
    weak passwords, in order to
  • 4:03 - 4:07
    spread itself, so a computer worm.
    This lead to the internet outage
  • 4:07 - 4:13
    of 1988. And you're probably asking
    yourselves: Why is the worm called
  • 4:13 - 4:21
    the Morris worm? Well, because the
    creator was very proud of his worm
  • 4:21 - 4:26
    and liked telling everybody how it worked.
    At one point he was even
  • 4:26 - 4:32
    at Harvard University, standing on the
    table, preaching about how his worm
  • 4:32 - 4:36
    worked in full detail.
    It was also obvious that
  • 4:36 - 4:41
    the original infection started there,
    he told everybody about it.
  • 4:41 - 4:45
    At one point someone told a journalist
    and he had to admit it. He got the
  • 4:45 - 4:50
    worm to be named after him to this day.
    But also he got
  • 4:50 - 4:57
    3 years probation, 400 hours social work
    and a 10,000 dollar fine, without
  • 4:57 - 5:02
    his need for admiration, he could have
    possibly been spared. But
  • 5:02 - 5:05
    not only hackers have a small problem
    with operational security and
  • 5:05 - 5:10
    a need for admiration, but also
    bank robbers. And here we have a
  • 5:10 - 5:15
    young man, who has robbed a bank.
    And what do you do when you have
  • 5:15 - 5:19
    experienced something exciting, and raked
    in a lot of money: a selfie of course.
  • 5:19 - 5:26
    Yeah. If that's not enough, you can also
    take another selfie.
  • 5:26 - 5:28
    Laughter
  • 5:28 - 5:37
    Or the accomplice. And also food. And then
    you quickly go to Instajail. And
  • 5:37 - 5:42
    you might think, that was a one off,
    no, you think: OK, nobody can actually
  • 5:42 - 5:46
    be that stupid, but when you
    look on the internet, you really don't
  • 5:46 - 5:53
    need long to find experts
    posting pictures like this. And
  • 5:53 - 5:56
    it always ends the same way: Here is
    the young man with, he must have
  • 5:56 - 6:01
    really awful teeth, they're already
    all gold, they were convicted,
  • 6:01 - 6:07
    because they bragged about
    having money on Facebook.
  • 6:07 - 6:12
    Now, if we look at the pioneers
    of car hacking, we have in principle
  • 6:12 - 6:18
    the same phenomenon. It must be added
    that the first ventures in car hacking
  • 6:18 - 6:27
    were more of an analogue nature
    and more brute force. And the pioneers in
  • 6:27 - 6:33
    this area were also these two
    young men, who managed a really big hack,
  • 6:33 - 6:38
    that is breaking in the windscreen.
    stole 5,000 dollars and an ipad
  • 6:38 - 6:44
    from a truck.
    And what is the first thing you do, when
  • 6:44 - 6:50
    you have an iPad: Well, first go to
    Burger King, because they have WiFi.
  • 6:51 - 6:56
    And play around a bit with the iPad.
    And then they noticed: Hey, awesome
  • 6:56 - 7:00
    you can make videos with this.
  • 7:00 - 7:06
    [Video is played]
  • 7:06 - 7:19
    ... This is my brother Dylan... This...
    good night's hussle
  • 7:19 - 7:25
    L: And because they had connected
    to the WiFi in Burger King with this
  • 7:25 - 7:29
    stolen iPad, that happened,
    what had to happen...
  • 7:29 - 7:34
    Laughter
  • 7:34 - 7:39
    L: And the owner of the vehicle then
  • 7:39 - 7:44
    handed the video over to the police
    and the police said, they're
  • 7:44 - 7:48
    actually already wanted.
    And they took care of the young men.
  • 7:48 - 7:53
    Thorsten Schröder:
    But let's get back
  • 7:53 - 7:58
    to the computer hacking corner, that
    we actually wanted to talk about today,
  • 7:58 - 8:02
    now we have taken a short trip to
    the analogue world. What could
  • 8:02 - 8:09
    go wrong if you, as
    an interested surfer, played around
  • 8:09 - 8:15
    on online shopping portals.
    Next you maybe want to
  • 8:15 - 8:19
    aquire some wares, then you start
    clicking around in the online shop.
  • 8:19 - 8:25
    Suddenly you slip and click
    the wrong thing, that happens sometimes,
  • 8:25 - 8:29
    you accidentally somehow
    enter a wrong signal,
  • 8:29 - 8:36
    and what's important here is: We are
    talking about a threat level for
  • 8:36 - 8:40
    the hacker,
    so when you are on the online shopping
  • 8:40 - 8:44
    portal and there
    your mouse accidentally slips, then
  • 8:44 - 8:49
    you have a certain threat scenario.
    It of course increases if you have
  • 8:49 - 8:52
    actually entered some strange symbols
  • 8:52 - 8:52
    You're there
  • 8:52 - 8:55
    probably without an anonymisation service
    because you wanted to
  • 8:55 - 9:02
    buy something. And now you think: Hmm,
    I like playing and am
  • 9:02 - 9:07
    curious, I'll activate Tor or
    something, and will visit this website
  • 9:07 - 9:12
    later with an anonymisation service.
    And yes, over time
  • 9:12 - 9:17
    you might accidentally find
    cross site scripting, the
  • 9:17 - 9:23
    threat level grows gradually, but
    you've got Tor at the start. The
  • 9:23 - 9:28
    threat level continues to grow,
    when perhaps you have found a
  • 9:28 - 9:32
    somewhat more critical weakness like
    an SQL injection. And it continues to grow
  • 9:32 - 9:38
    when you have perhaps also found a
    remote code execution, then
  • 9:38 - 9:42
    we're already pretty high. So if you
    got caught now, it would be pretty
  • 9:42 - 9:45
    bad, because you've already proved
    that you didn't directly go to the portal
  • 9:45 - 9:49
    after having found an xss exploit
    or another trivial weak point
  • 9:49 - 9:54
    and told them about it.
    Well, what happens then, when you
  • 9:54 - 9:58
    continue rummaging around. Depends
    what you're looking for. Maybe you also
  • 9:58 - 10:03
    find a few credit cards. Now we're on
    a really high threat level,
  • 10:03 - 10:10
    and it quickly sinks because
    ...it becomes more relaxed.
  • 10:10 - 10:15
    You don't need to be scared anymore
    about ever getting caught again
  • 10:15 - 10:21
    for this hack. Yes,
    why would anyone get caught there?
  • 10:21 - 10:26
    Because I thought of OpSec much too
    late. At the moment where I
  • 10:26 - 10:30
    slipped with the mouse, I should have
    basically already had an anonymisation
  • 10:30 - 10:35
    service, some kind of Tor service
    or something, right at the start,
  • 10:35 - 10:41
    because at the moment where the
    portal provider realises, that something
  • 10:41 - 10:48
    happened, they'll just look and see:
    Alright, we'll follow this back,
  • 10:48 - 10:51
    it's a Tor session, bad,
    but at some point they come across
  • 10:51 - 10:56
    this case where you said "oops". And then
    they will find you.
  • 10:58 - 11:02
    L: It actually happens quite a lot that
    people are like:
  • 11:02 - 11:06
    Oh, look, I found something
    and now I'll go to Tor
  • 11:06 - 11:11
    No, guys, it's too late,
    you have to do it beforehand.
  • 11:11 - 11:15
    T: Sorry, if you notice something
    like that, you can of course
  • 11:15 - 11:18
    think about what the data protection
    regulation looks like, then you can
  • 11:18 - 11:22
    look at what kind of data protection
    guidelines they have, some companies
  • 11:22 - 11:26
    tell you how long they keep your
    logfiles
  • 11:26 - 11:28
  • 11:28 - 11:31
  • 11:31 - 11:34
  • 11:34 - 11:37
  • 11:37 - 11:43
  • 11:43 - 11:48
  • 11:48 - 11:52
  • 11:52 - 11:58
  • 11:58 - 12:02
  • 12:02 - 12:06
  • 12:06 - 12:12
  • 12:12 - 12:16
  • 12:16 - 12:20
  • 12:20 - 12:23
  • 12:23 - 12:26
  • 12:26 - 12:30
  • 12:30 - 12:34
  • 12:34 - 12:36
  • 12:36 - 12:40
  • 12:40 - 12:44
  • 12:44 - 12:48
  • 12:48 - 12:51
  • 12:51 - 12:54
  • 12:54 - 13:00
  • 13:00 - 13:07
  • 13:07 - 13:11
  • 13:11 - 13:17
  • 13:17 - 13:21
  • 13:21 - 13:27
  • 13:27 - 13:31
  • 13:31 - 13:37
  • 13:37 - 13:44
  • 13:44 - 13:47
  • 13:47 - 13:51
  • 13:51 - 13:55
  • 13:55 - 13:59
  • 13:59 - 14:04
  • 14:04 - 14:10
  • 14:10 - 14:14
  • 14:14 - 14:20
  • 14:20 - 14:28
  • 14:28 - 14:32
  • 14:32 - 14:39
  • 14:39 - 14:44
  • 14:44 - 14:50
  • 14:50 - 14:53
  • 14:53 - 14:58
  • 14:58 - 15:03
  • 15:03 - 15:09
  • 15:09 - 15:15
  • 15:15 - 15:18
  • 15:18 - 15:21
  • 15:21 - 15:25
  • 15:25 - 15:28
  • 15:28 - 15:32
  • 15:32 - 15:36
  • 15:36 - 15:41
  • 15:41 - 15:51
  • 15:51 - 15:54
  • 15:54 - 16:04
  • 16:04 - 16:08
  • 16:08 - 16:17
  • 16:17 - 16:23
  • 16:23 - 16:27
  • 16:27 - 16:35
  • 16:35 - 16:43
  • 16:43 - 16:47
  • 16:47 - 16:50
  • 16:50 - 16:59
  • 16:59 - 17:04
  • 17:04 - 17:12
  • 17:12 - 17:15
  • 17:15 - 17:20
  • 17:20 - 17:22
  • 17:22 - 17:24
  • 18:11 - 18:21
  • 18:21 - 18:26
  • 18:26 - 18:31
  • 18:31 - 18:37
  • 18:37 - 18:41
  • 18:41 - 18:49
  • 18:49 - 18:56
  • 18:56 - 19:00
  • 19:00 - 19:04
  • 19:04 - 19:08
  • 19:08 - 19:12
  • 19:12 - 19:20
  • 19:20 - 19:24
  • 19:24 - 19:28
  • 19:28 - 19:32
  • 19:32 - 19:37
  • 19:37 - 19:44
  • 19:44 - 19:49
  • 19:49 - 19:56
  • 19:56 - 20:03
  • 20:03 - 20:06
  • 20:06 - 20:10
  • 20:10 - 20:17
  • 20:17 - 20:21
  • 20:21 - 20:25
  • 20:25 - 20:31
  • 20:31 - 20:35
  • 20:35 - 20:42
  • 20:42 - 20:46
  • 20:46 - 20:50
  • 20:50 - 20:54
  • 20:54 - 20:58
  • 20:58 - 21:03
  • 21:03 - 21:07
  • 21:07 - 21:12
  • 21:12 - 21:16
  • 21:16 - 21:21
  • 21:21 - 21:24
  • 21:24 - 21:26
  • 21:26 - 21:30
  • 21:30 - 21:35
  • 21:35 - 21:41
  • 21:41 - 21:47
  • 21:47 - 21:52
  • 21:52 - 21:56
  • 21:56 - 22:00
  • 22:00 - 22:05
  • 22:05 - 22:08
  • 22:08 - 22:11
  • 22:11 - 22:15
  • 22:15 - 22:20
  • 22:20 - 22:23
  • 22:23 - 22:29
  • 22:29 - 22:32
  • 22:32 - 22:36
  • 22:36 - 22:40
  • 22:40 - 22:42
  • 22:42 - 22:46
  • 22:46 - 22:52
  • 22:52 - 22:56
  • 22:56 - 23:00
  • 23:00 - 23:04
  • 23:04 - 23:07
  • 23:07 - 23:11
  • 23:11 - 23:15
  • 23:15 - 23:19
  • 23:19 - 23:25
  • 23:25 - 23:29
  • 23:29 - 23:34
  • 23:34 - 23:38
  • 23:38 - 23:42
  • 23:42 - 23:47
  • 23:47 - 23:51
  • 23:51 - 23:55
  • 23:55 - 24:03
  • 24:03 - 24:07
  • 24:07 - 24:10
  • 24:10 - 24:15
  • 24:15 - 24:20
  • 24:20 - 24:27
  • 24:27 - 24:34
  • 24:34 - 24:42
  • 24:42 - 24:45
  • 24:45 - 24:51
  • 24:51 - 24:53
  • 24:53 - 25:00
  • 25:00 - 25:05
  • 25:05 - 25:15
  • 25:15 - 25:20
  • 25:20 - 25:26
  • 25:26 - 25:31
  • 25:31 - 25:34
  • 25:34 - 25:40
  • 25:40 - 25:46
  • 25:46 - 25:52
  • 25:52 - 25:56
  • 25:56 - 26:00
  • 26:00 - 26:04
  • 26:04 - 26:08
  • 26:08 - 26:15
  • 26:15 - 26:20
  • 26:20 - 26:29
  • 26:29 - 26:35
  • 26:35 - 26:40
  • 26:40 - 26:46
  • 26:46 - 26:52
  • 26:52 - 26:58
  • 26:58 - 27:02
  • 27:02 - 27:08
  • 27:08 - 27:13
  • 27:13 - 27:19
  • 27:19 - 27:25
  • 27:25 - 27:29
  • 27:29 - 27:34
  • 27:34 - 27:37
  • 27:37 - 27:42
  • 27:42 - 27:45
  • 27:45 - 27:48
  • 27:48 - 27:53
  • 27:53 - 27:56
  • 27:56 - 28:07
  • 28:07 - 28:11
  • 28:11 - 28:15
  • 28:15 - 28:20
  • 28:20 - 28:24
  • 28:24 - 28:29
  • 28:29 - 28:34
  • 28:34 - 28:39
  • 28:39 - 28:42
  • 28:42 - 28:46
  • 28:46 - 28:53
  • 28:53 - 28:58
  • 28:58 - 29:03
  • 29:03 - 29:07
  • 29:07 - 29:11
  • 29:11 - 29:17
  • 29:17 - 29:22
  • 29:22 - 29:28
  • 29:28 - 29:35
  • 29:35 - 29:42
  • 29:42 - 29:45
  • 29:45 - 29:49
  • 29:49 - 29:53
  • 29:53 - 29:56
  • 29:56 - 29:59
  • 29:59 - 30:06
  • 30:06 - 30:10
  • 30:10 - 30:16
  • 30:16 - 30:21
  • 30:21 - 30:26
  • 30:26 - 30:30
  • 30:30 - 30:34
  • 30:34 - 30:40
  • 30:40 - 30:43
  • 30:43 - 30:47
  • 30:47 - 30:51
  • 30:51 - 30:57
  • 30:57 - 31:03
  • 31:03 - 31:10
  • 31:10 - 31:15
  • 31:15 - 31:20
  • 31:20 - 31:24
  • 31:24 - 31:29
  • 31:29 - 31:33
  • 31:33 - 31:39
  • 31:39 - 31:46
  • 31:46 - 31:51
  • 31:51 - 31:55
  • 31:55 - 32:00
  • 32:00 - 32:05
  • 32:05 - 32:08
  • 32:08 - 32:13
  • 32:13 - 32:17
  • 32:17 - 32:22
  • 32:22 - 32:29
  • 32:29 - 32:34
  • 32:34 - 32:40
  • 32:40 - 32:44
  • 32:44 - 32:48
  • 32:48 - 32:53
  • 32:53 - 33:00
  • 33:00 - 33:07
  • 33:07 - 33:11
  • 33:11 - 33:15
  • 33:15 - 33:19
  • 33:19 - 33:25
  • 33:25 - 33:29
  • 33:29 - 33:34
  • 33:34 - 33:40
  • 33:40 - 33:46
  • 33:46 - 33:53
  • 33:53 - 33:56
  • 33:56 - 34:03
  • 34:03 - 34:11
  • 34:11 - 34:16
  • 34:16 - 34:22
  • 34:22 - 34:29
  • 34:29 - 34:35
  • 34:35 - 34:39
  • 34:39 - 34:51
  • 34:51 - 34:57
  • 34:57 - 35:03
  • 35:03 - 35:08
  • 35:08 - 35:17
  • 35:17 - 35:21
  • 35:21 - 35:30
  • 35:30 - 35:35
  • 35:35 - 35:40
  • 35:40 - 35:44
  • 35:44 - 35:49
  • 35:49 - 35:53
  • 35:53 - 36:04
  • 36:04 - 36:07
  • 36:07 - 36:11
  • 36:11 - 36:13
  • 36:13 - 36:17
  • 36:17 - 36:23
  • 36:23 - 36:28
  • 36:28 - 36:31
  • 36:31 - 36:36
  • 36:36 - 36:43
  • 36:43 - 36:46
  • 36:46 - 36:50
  • 36:50 - 36:55
  • 36:55 - 36:58
  • 36:58 - 36:59
  • 36:59 - 37:05
  • 37:05 - 37:12
  • 37:12 - 37:16
  • 37:16 - 37:19
  • 37:19 - 37:22
  • 37:22 - 37:29
  • 37:29 - 37:33
  • 37:33 - 37:38
  • 37:38 - 37:45
  • 37:45 - 37:49
  • 37:49 - 37:55
  • 37:55 - 37:59
  • 37:59 - 38:06
  • 38:06 - 38:11
  • 38:11 - 38:17
  • 38:17 - 38:22
  • 38:22 - 38:25
  • 38:25 - 38:30
  • 38:30 - 38:38
  • 38:38 - 38:47
  • 38:47 - 38:52
  • 38:52 - 38:58
  • 38:58 - 39:08
  • 39:08 - 39:11
  • 39:11 - 39:15
  • 39:15 - 39:18
  • 39:18 - 39:21
  • 39:21 - 39:23
  • 39:23 - 39:27
  • 39:27 - 39:33
  • 39:33 - 39:41
  • 39:41 - 39:45
  • 39:45 - 39:53
  • 39:53 - 39:59
  • 39:59 - 40:04
  • 40:04 - 40:09
  • 40:09 - 40:13
  • 40:13 - 40:18
  • 40:18 - 40:21
  • 40:21 - 40:27
  • 40:27 - 40:32
  • 40:32 - 40:39
  • 40:39 - 40:44
  • 40:44 - 40:48
  • 40:48 - 40:51
  • 40:51 - 40:56
  • 40:56 - 41:01
  • 41:01 - 41:06
  • 41:06 - 41:12
  • 41:12 - 41:18
  • 41:18 - 41:28
  • 41:28 - 41:33
  • 41:33 - 41:39
  • 41:39 - 41:48
  • 41:48 - 41:53
  • 41:53 - 41:57
  • 41:57 - 42:02
  • 42:02 - 42:06
  • 42:06 - 42:11
  • 42:11 - 42:17
  • 42:17 - 42:24
  • 42:24 - 42:28
  • 42:28 - 42:34
  • 42:34 - 42:39
  • 42:39 - 42:44
  • 42:44 - 42:49
  • 42:49 - 42:54
  • 42:54 - 42:58
  • 42:58 - 43:02
  • 43:02 - 43:06
  • 43:06 - 43:10
  • 43:10 - 43:12
  • 43:12 - 43:16
  • 43:16 - 43:20
  • 43:20 - 43:23
  • 43:23 - 43:27
  • 43:27 - 43:31
  • 43:31 - 43:33
  • 43:33 - 43:37
  • 43:37 - 43:42
  • 43:42 - 43:48
  • 43:48 - 43:52
  • 43:52 - 43:56
  • 43:56 - 44:01
  • 44:01 - 44:06
  • 44:06 - 44:11
  • 44:11 - 44:17
  • 44:17 - 44:23
  • 44:23 - 44:28
  • 44:28 - 44:32
  • 44:32 - 44:39
  • 44:39 - 44:46
  • 44:46 - 44:50
  • 44:50 - 44:54
  • 44:54 - 44:56
  • 44:56 - 44:59
  • 44:59 - 45:03
  • 45:03 - 45:06
  • 45:06 - 45:13
  • 45:13 - 45:17
  • 45:17 - 45:22
  • 45:22 - 45:26
  • 45:26 - 45:30
  • 45:30 - 45:34
  • 45:34 - 45:40
  • 45:40 - 45:44
  • 45:44 - 45:48
  • 45:48 - 45:52
  • 45:52 - 45:56
  • 45:56 - 46:04
  • 46:04 - 46:09
  • 46:09 - 46:14
  • 46:14 - 46:16
  • 46:16 - 46:20
  • 46:20 - 46:26
  • 46:26 - 46:33
  • 46:33 - 46:39
  • 46:39 - 46:44
  • 46:44 - 46:49
  • 46:49 - 46:55
  • 46:55 - 47:01
  • 47:01 - 47:06
  • 47:06 - 47:09
  • 47:09 - 47:13
  • 47:13 - 47:18
  • 47:18 - 47:22
  • 47:22 - 47:28
  • 47:28 - 47:36
  • 47:36 - 47:40
  • 47:40 - 47:44
  • 47:44 - 47:51
  • 47:51 - 47:56
  • 47:56 - 48:01
  • 48:01 - 48:05
  • 48:05 - 48:09
  • 48:09 - 48:14
  • 48:14 - 48:22
  • 48:22 - 48:29
  • 48:29 - 48:35
  • 48:35 - 48:41
  • 48:41 - 48:46
  • 48:46 - 48:51
  • 48:51 - 48:57
  • 48:57 - 49:00
  • 49:00 - 49:04
  • 49:04 - 49:07
  • 49:07 - 49:10
  • 49:10 - 49:17
  • 49:17 - 49:23
  • 49:23 - 49:28
  • 49:28 - 49:33
  • 49:33 - 49:40
  • 49:40 - 49:49
  • 49:49 - 49:54
  • 49:54 - 49:59
  • 49:59 - 50:03
  • 50:03 - 50:10
  • 50:10 - 50:14
  • 50:14 - 50:19
  • 50:19 - 50:24
  • 50:24 - 50:30
  • 50:30 - 50:35
  • 50:35 - 50:41
  • 50:41 - 50:45
  • 50:45 - 50:48
  • 50:48 - 50:52
  • 50:52 - 50:57
  • 50:57 - 51:03
  • 51:03 - 51:06
  • 51:06 - 51:10
  • 51:10 - 51:14
  • 51:14 - 51:18
  • 51:18 - 51:24
  • 51:24 - 51:28
  • 51:28 - 51:38
  • 51:38 - 51:41
  • 51:41 - 51:44
  • 51:44 - 51:48
  • 51:48 - 51:53
  • 51:53 - 51:57
  • 51:57 - 52:00
  • 52:00 - 52:06
  • 52:06 - 52:13
  • 52:13 - 52:18
  • 52:18 - 52:22
  • 52:22 - 52:26
  • 52:26 - 52:30
  • 52:30 - 52:35
  • 52:35 - 52:44
  • 52:44 - 52:50
  • 52:50 - 52:56
  • 52:56 - 53:00
  • 53:00 - 53:04
  • 53:04 - 53:12
  • 53:12 - 53:15
  • 53:15 - 53:19
  • 53:19 - 53:26
  • 53:26 - 53:31
  • 53:31 - 53:35
  • 53:35 - 53:40
  • 53:40 - 53:44
  • 53:44 - 53:50
  • 53:50 - 53:55
  • 53:56 - 54:01
  • 54:01 - 54:05
  • 54:05 - 54:13
  • 54:13 - 54:19
  • 54:19 - 54:24
  • 54:24 - 54:30
  • 54:30 - 54:36
  • 54:36 - 54:40
  • 54:40 - 54:44
  • 54:44 - 54:59
  • 54:59 - 55:04
  • 55:04 - 55:09
  • 55:09 - 55:16
  • 55:16 - 55:20
  • 55:20 - 55:23
  • 55:23 - 55:31
  • 55:31 - 55:36
  • 55:36 - 55:47
  • 55:47 - 55:52
  • 55:52 - 56:00
  • 56:00 - 56:09
  • 56:09 - 56:12
  • 56:12 - 56:18
  • 56:18 - 56:22
  • 56:22 - 56:27
  • 56:27 - 56:36
  • 56:36 - 56:42
  • 56:42 - 56:43
  • 56:43 - 56:48
  • 56:48 - 57:06
Title:
35C3 - Du kannst alles hacken – du darfst dich nur nicht erwischen lassen.
Description:

more » « less
Video Language:
German
Duration:
57:06

English subtitles

Incomplete

Revisions Compare revisions