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Guitar Technique: Minimum Movement Exercise (Guitar Lesson TE-004)

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    Hey, how ya doing?
    Justin here today.
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    I'm gonna share with you
    an awesome little exercise
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    called "Minimum Movement".
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    It's a small idea with big consequences, this one.
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    Uh, we're gonna be using the G major scale.
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    Doesn't really matter what scale you use.
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    This is just a good one because
    it's using all of your fingers.
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    Um, but you could use
    another scale if you like.
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    Um, and the idea here really, it's all just
    about learning to control your fingers.
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    I'm gonna talk about it a little bit
    more after I've given you the close up
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    and the proper example of it.
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    But, uh, let's get to our close up
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    and, uh, check out actually
    how to do this exercise.
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    Let me start by playing
    you the G major scale
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    the one way I most commonly see it
    if I ask a student to play me the scale.
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    So, it might look something like this.
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    'playing'
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    Okay? Now let me play it another way
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    and see if you can spot the difference
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    'playing'
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    Looks pretty different, doesn't it?
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    'playing'
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    So the difference is
    that my fingers are under control.
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    I call it "Flying Fingers" when
    people's fingers, you know
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    particularly little fingers,
    for a lot of people they really
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    want to fly right off the neck
    as soon as they finish playing the note.
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    Whee! Off goes little finger.
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    So, what you want to do with this exercise is
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    play the G major scale really slowly
    and try not to let any finger move more
    than a millimeter or two from the fingerboard.
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    Right? Doesn't sound like that difficult a thing
    but when you try it you're gonna find it is.
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    So, first note. Now, let's just
    put the little finger down.
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    There we go, now first finger's
    actually already kind of in place.
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    Now second finger has just got
    to move over there, there we go.
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    Little finger, now don't let it
    move up, there we go.
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    First finger over now,
    and it's just really
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    slowly trying to get the fingers
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    cause you are gonna find
    I'm almost certain that
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    some of the fingers
    want to lift right up off the fingerboard.
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    Particularly like here,
    moving that third finger over.
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    Little finger wants to go "Hey!"
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    But you gotta try and keep
    it under control there.
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    The whole way, especially
    here agian, that- th-
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    could really feel my little finger
    wanting to lift up there.
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    Wo- wait- actually, I let them
    all have a bit of a run there.
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    So we're just really trying
    to get those fingers
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    so they're hardly moving at all,
    and you really want to go slow with this.
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    There's absolutely no point in trying to do it fast.
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    And you're gonna find when you
    try and do this exercise yourself
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    it's actually a lot more difficult than it looks.
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    Oh, little finger just had a little bit of a wander as well.
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    It's difficult! You know, especially there as well.
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    When you're changing
    fingers behind little finger when it's already off.
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    Like now, it wants to lift up,
    and you have to really
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    concentrate to make sure
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    oh, there it goes again
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    You stay down,
    you little rumin.
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    Again, it was jumping
    a little bit.
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    But that's the exercise.
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    So this exercise is all about
    controlling your fingers.
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    The speed thing is really-really
    not important here
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    It's not at all
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    So doing it fast will
    just spoil the excercise
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    And there'd be no point in doing it
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    You really wanna be doing slow, careful,
    controlled movements
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    And making sure that
    you're in control of all of your fingers
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    All the time. Most people struggle
    with the little finger particularly
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    The fact is that it'll just play
    and as soon as I finish playing the note
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    it jumps right
    off the fingerboard
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    and that's really normal
    but you'll just have to do it
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    slowly enough to get it right.
    Okay, now I'm gonna move over
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    to my 1st finger now, little finger
    you'll just stay there and just concentrate
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    on that little finger, making sure
    it doesn't lift off.
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    Concentrate 'n' concentrate
    and try, and you will find
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    that you can control it!
    You can do it!
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    Even if it feels like
    you can't originally,
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    you can definitely
    control your fingers properly.
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    You just have to practice doing it
    and learn how to make sure that
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    there's no kinda instinctive
    muscle reactions thrown out
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    by your brain while you're playing.
    You wanna be in control of
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    every little movement that they make.
    Now, what you gonna find, it's really
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    interesting is this has a big effect
    on your playing all over.
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    Without having to practice individual
    things, so if you'd work on this
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    using the G major scale, as
    I'm suggesting, you'll find that
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    it's just naturally kind of infects
    your blues scale and the licks
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    that you're playing and songs
    that you're working on.
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    Your fingers will naturally be
    a lot more under control and
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    you'll find them flying off a
    little bit more, if you do find it,
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    particularly, for a, you know,
    well, a particular tune or
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    a riff that you're learning when
    your fingers are flying about a bit,
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    then, you might wanna spend
    little bit of time with that
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    one riff, or that one lick,
    or whatever it is, that you're
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    struggling with, but generally
    you're gonna find that this
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    one exercise, 5 minutes a day
    this one, is a really big deal.
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    It's a great thing to have
    in your practice routine.
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    Good little warm-up thing as well,
    because it's not very strenous and
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    not very fast, so you can just
    really get you know, get your brain
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    into the zone there, so
    really, unbelievably great
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    exercise is it. It was a
    real game-changer for me
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    to, made a huge impact on my
    technique generally, so
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    I hope it does the
    same for you.
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    See you for plenty more
    lessons and songs very soon,
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    You take care of yourselves!
    Bye-bye!
Titel:
Guitar Technique: Minimum Movement Exercise (Guitar Lesson TE-004)
Beschreibung:

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Video Language:
English
Team:
JustinGuitar (legacy)
Projekt:
Technique (TE)
Duration:
05:32

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