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Ushahidi Haiti

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    The past ten days has literally revolutionized
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    humanitarian response. Never in the past
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    have we been able to deal with the information vaccume
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    that typically exists in the first 24-72 hours where
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    there's just no information. Everybody's scrambling and
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    nobody knows what to send, how much to send
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    what have you, really what the extent
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    of the impact is. In large part, thanks to Ushahidi's
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    approach to information collection, ie "crowdsourcing"
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    we were able to fill that gap. About a couple hours
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    after the earthquake hit. I was basically watching CNN when
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    I learned the news. I immediately called David Kobia.
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    So, Patrick Meier called and asked me to set up an
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    Ushahidi instance for Haiti. All in all it too about an hour
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    to thow this up. We became inundated with traffic after that
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    which we were highly unprepared for. Our servers
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    kept crashing constantly. So this gave us an opportunity
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    to really learn by doing. And this has been tremendous for us.
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    We've been able to really add features that have been
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    necessary from the beginning, but just haven't been there.
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    How many software developers have a chance to work with
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    the State Department, or with the Coast Guard to tell them,
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    "Hey there's somebody stuck under a collapsed wall somewhere,
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    "Here's their phone number. Here's where we think they
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    are. Go find them." It's just so remarkable. Ushahidi as an
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    African innovation. Here we are, at least I am, in Washington
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    D.C. using this innovation coming from Africa to try to help
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    people in Haiti... and leveraging volunteers all over the world
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    I mean, it's really a flattened world. And so as we started to work
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    together and realizing here's a great example of ordinary
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    people together doing and extraordinary thing.
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    We had an urgent request for a school near [place]. 100's of
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    trapped children. The SAR team had originally been sent
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    out by UN Dispatch. The had gotten to the location and
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    realized that it was a wrong location and I ended up
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    being able to give them an extremely accurate location
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    and a SAR team made it out and... they managed to
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    rescue some of the children who were trapped in there.
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    It's really hard and totally heart-breaking to be reading
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    these messages... it's literally life or death situations.
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    People are dying and the faster you can get people onto the
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    ground, the faster you can get them help. And
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    that's one of the reasons I'm still here... because it feels
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    like we're really making a difference. And that's what the
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    people on the ground are telling us.
Titel:
Ushahidi Haiti
Beschreibung:

A summary video of the work Ushahidi and others did during the crisis response in Haiti.

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Video Language:
English
Team:
Ushahidi
antikathistemi added a translation

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