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Chat with Space Station Commander Chris Hadfield - SA Hangout #8

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    OK, so, the button up here says Live
    so I'm gonna go ahead and start talking.
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    Hello everybody, welcome
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    to a collaborative Read Science! /
    Scientific American Hangout
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    and we have a very special guest here today,
    Commander Hadfield,
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    former Commander of Expedition 35
    with the International Space Station,
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    recently retired astronaut.
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    I'm Joanne Manaster,
    a blogger at Scientific American
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    and just a mad enthusiast for space,
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    and, of course, reading,
    and STEM advocacy,
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    so I'm especially pleased
    to have Chris here today.
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    Joining me is my co-host, Jeff Shaumeyer.
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    We do a lot of interviews with authors
    because we like to ask authors
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    how do they relate science
    to the general public?
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    Of course, I see astronauts as
    our greatest STEM advocates,
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    and they do a fantastic job sharing this.
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    In addition, we also have Clara Moskowitz,
    who is the space and physics editor
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    at Scientific American also
    along for the discussion.
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    Chris, thank you so much for joining us.
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    We are so glad you could join us
    considering you are very, very busy
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    with a book tour promoting your book,
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    "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth",
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    with, "What going to space taught me
    about ingenuity, determination,
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    and being prepared for anything."
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    But my impression from the book is that
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    this is good advice for everyone.
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    So, why don't you say hello
    to the audience,
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    and tell us a little bit about
    when did you start writing this book?
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    Chris Hadfield: Good day, thank you
    very much for the invitation
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    to be part of the Hangout today.
    It's a treat.
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    I've been traveling all across North America
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    over the last few weeks
    talking about the content of the book
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    everything from sitting in bookstores
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    right through to being on
    Conan the other night.
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    And I started working on
    the book years ago,
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    in truth, started thinking about
    the book a long, long time ago,
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    but I wanted to wait until I gathered
    enough useful information
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    to make writing a book wothwhile,
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    and, also, as an astronaut
    for the last 21 years,
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    it's a busy job.
    It's really demanding,
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    and a very experience-rich job,
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    so there wasn't much time to write a book.
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    But as I knew I was getting close
    to my last space flight,
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    and the opportunity to live
    on the International Space Station,
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    I thought, now it made sense.
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    I'm one of the old guys now,
    I hopefully got a whole diary
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    full of things that have happened, and
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    time to start putting together a book.
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    So, one day sitting on an airplane,
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    I had my sudoku book,
    and I started making notes
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    on the back of it, of,
    "OK, when I write this book,
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    how am I gonnna lay it out?
    How am I gonna tell the stories,
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    which stories do I wanna
    be sure and remember?
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    And then, what's the point of it?
    What am I writing this book for?
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    What is the real reason
    that I would even write a book?
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    And, it occurred to me when
    my wife and I were out walking the dogs,
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    that it's back on Earth that matters, of course.
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    Nobody really cares what happens in space.
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    What matters is,
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    "How does it affect us and influence us?"
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    And so that's why I just thought one day,
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    "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth"
    makes the most sense.
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    And then I wrote the book
    over a period of a couple of years,
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    but then so much stuff happened
    during the five months on the space station
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    that there was a lot of work to do
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    to get it finished this past summer.
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    But, finally, got it all done,
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    and got it into the publishers on time,
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    and it's multiple publishers,
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    and got it released
    just before Halloween.
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    And it's a New York's Times'
    best seller now,
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    so that's pretty amazing
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    for someone who never
    set out to be an author.
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    But I'm really pleased,
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    and thanks for inviting me
    to talk to folks today.
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    Joanne Manaster: So,
    the interesting thing is,
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    you had to include,
    what has set you apart
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    from many other astronauts
    is your social media prowess,
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    which includes assistance
    from your entire family, it seems.
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    So, that was a very important
    part of this book,
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    so you did have to wait.
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    I feel like this book wouldn't be complete
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    if you wrote it, and then you became
    a social media, you know, star.
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    Chris Hadfield: Yes,
    and there's a lot to learn from that.
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    Part of the social media results
    are purely technological.
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    We didn't have that capability
    on the space shuttle
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    the first couple of times that I flew.
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    And we only recently really
    got it on the space station,
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    where we have the connectivity,
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    and the two-way connectivity,
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    the ability to downlink video
    from the space station
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    hasn't really existed,
    at least any sort of high-def video,
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    so I was lucky to arrive on station
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    when all that technology
    suddenly got up there.
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    And then part of it is just,
    as the last 20 years as an astronaut,
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    and one of the few Canadian astronauts,
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    the demand for public speaking
    was really high,
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    and so I've had my share of
    trying to tell this whole story
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    of how do you relate the really
    unusual things that astronauts do,
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    the strange ways that we prepare,
    and the bizarre experiences
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    of, you know, being blinded
    during a spacewalk,
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    or trying to deal with a
    live snake in my airplane,
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    or that type of strange things that happen
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    How do you take those stories
    and then filter out of them
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    what is useful to everybody?
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    And it's something I learned
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    over twenty years speaking at
    schools and businesses
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    and government assemblies
    and things as an astronaut.
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    And the book is very much
    the grandchild of all of those talks,
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    of a learned way to try and
    present the information
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    so it's both inherently interesting,
    but also inherently useful.
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    And social media was just
    another way to do a high school talk,
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    but in this case to a million people.
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    Jeff Shaumeyer: Our whole theme with
    this program is science communication,
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    and getting people interested in science
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    by telling interesting stories,
    meeting interesting people,
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    anything will do,
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    and I got to know you thanks to Twitter,
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    and the photographs that you sent
    from the space station,
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    which you tell us is largely
    down to your son, Evan,
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    convincing you to do the outreach with
    the social media and marketing space,
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    and that's how tens of thousands
    of other people got it,
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    which is, you know, valuable,
    really valuable for science outreach.
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    But this is nothing new for you, either,
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    interesting people in space has been
    one of your themes the whole time,
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    so, here I am with my essay question
    of, you know, how to do this,
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    why to do this, how we
    can become space rockstars,
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    and it certainly comes down
    to being an interesting person,
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    after a while, it seems like, but,
    this is nothing new for you, really,
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    it's just some of the tools
    have changed, right?
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    Chris Hadfield: It's true. When society or
    your employer labels you as an "astronaut"
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    when you start talking to a stranger,
    you know, you're sitting on a bus
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    or an airplane or in a restaurant,
    and you're having a normal conversation,
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    you're a normal-looking person,
    and then, as soon as they discover
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    that you're an astronaut,
    all conversation ceases.
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    There is no chance anymore
    for a normal, two-way dialogue
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    because the job is so rare that it derails
    any sort of way to have a normal talk.
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    So I learned a long time ago not to tell
    people I'm an astronaut for a while
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    because otherwise all I ever do
    is talk about myself,
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    and I never learn anything
    about anybody else.
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    So when you say that one of the keys
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    to social media is to be
    an interesting person,
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    the reason I bring this up is
    everybody is an interesting person,
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    and the whole key is in presentation.
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    And if you talk to anybody,
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    if you can - I did this as a
    self-defense mechanism -
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    but when I'm sitting next to someone
    I try and as swiftly as possible
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    start digging through the
    normal layers of politeness
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    and nothing-conversations, small talk,
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    and try and get to the levels where
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    these people know something
    that I don't know,
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    or they have an insight
    that I haven't had,
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    or they have an experience or been to
    a place that I haven't been,
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    and start talking about that.
    Something that, where you can see
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    a little light come into their eyes,
    where you can see them
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    take an interest because
    you've taken an interest.
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    And you can get there really quickly,
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    if you cut out the normal crap
    of conversation and just start
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    asking someone,
    so, where did you grow up?
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    And what age did you leave home?
    And why did you take that course in school?
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    And what was the second car you bought?
    You know, what color interior?
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    What color interior did you choose
    in this second car you bought?
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    And get somebody into themselves,
    and you will learn stuff
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    and the conversation becomes
    much more interesting.
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    And that's the part that you need
    to tell people about in social media.
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    They don't wanna hear
    'Look at me!', 'Buy my soap!'
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    They wanna hear why what
    you're doing in life is important to you,
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    or why this made you laugh,
    or why it made you sad,
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    or some little thing you observed
    that was new to you, the honesty of it,
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    and the personal perspective of it.
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    That is what social media brings,
    and try to bring that up.
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    And if a scientist, who is looking
    at new particles coming into
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    the alpha magnetic sprectrometer
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    can talk about why
    that's exciting to them,
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    or, you know, what as a kid inspired
    them to think about doing this,
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    then, then it becomes the human story
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    that all of us are
    inherently interested in,
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    and that's what my son coached me on,
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    but also through trial and error, that
    I've learned is effective in social media.
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    Jeff Shaumeyer: Well, that was a really
    central theme in the book, too,
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    was this, sort of, the lack of ego,
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    the authentic interest in other people,
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    and one phrase that I really liked,
    when you were doing survivorship training,
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    you talked about developing
    good leadership skills
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    and good "followship" skills.
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    And I think that that all is
    part of the picture of
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    of being interested in other people,
    not letting your ego get in the way,
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    and, as you said at another point,
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    making someone else
    look good or feel good
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    does not diminish you.
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    Chris Hadfield: Right.
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    Jeff Shaumeyer: It builds both of you up.
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    Chris Hadfield: Yeah, and if you can make
    someone else look good,
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    not only are they liable to
    exceed themselves,
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    and pick up some of the slack,
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    but it gives you a chance to rest!
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    It gives you a chance to try
    and get your act together,
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    and actually notice what's going on,
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    while you allow someone else
    to develop beyond,
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    whether it's for one minute,
    or for life,
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    that you allow someone else to develop
    beyond where they were.
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    It's not dog-eat-dog all the time.
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    You know, sometimes we're
    a whole pack of dogs,
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    and we need to work together.
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    Jeff Shaumeyer: And that was, you know-
    the subtitle of the book,
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    I read it, about,
    "What going to space taught me
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    about being prepared for anything,"
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    which sounds good as a subtitle,
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    but to discover that's what
    you were actually talking about
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    (laughter)
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    was quite a surprise, and
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    that you tell autobiographical stories
    that are interesting
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    because people don't have a
    ready instinct about
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    what is flight in space and
    what preparations you've done,
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    but you also find very
    interesting lessons from that
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    about how to work well with people,
    and to some people, you know,
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    how to succeed without
    making everyone else fail.
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    Those are a really valuable
    part of the book, too.
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    That all gets mixed up with the science,
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    and it all works as a unit.
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    I really enjoyed that.
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    Chris Hadfield: Yeah, and part of my
    motivation also is that people,
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    and by people I mean the people
    that pay for the space program,
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    they can't support it or not support it
    if they don't know it exists
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    You know, you can't have an opinion about
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    whether we should have
    a space station or not
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    if you've never heard of it, or
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    if you don't know that we have one.
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    And you definitely can't make an
    informed decision about it
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    if you don't understand
    what's going on up there.
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    And it's not just a remote place where
    we do interesting robotic experiments,
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    on an esoteric level,
    that don't benefit anyone.
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    It is a whole cornucopia of things.
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    It's hundreds of experiments.
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    It's insight into the universe,
    it's insight into the world,
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    but it's also insight into ourselves.
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    And social media is an invitation on-board
    to see it for what it really is,
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    not the manufactured or glossy product
    we want people to think what it is,
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    but actually an invitation on-board
    to see all of the raw material
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    of capability that we've put up there.
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    And that is contagious.
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    You know, it interests people beyond the
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    people who are naturally
    drawn to scientific research.
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    But it draws in people of all
    walks of life.
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    And that's who we're asking to
    pay for the space station.
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    They have to see everything it can do.
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    And astronauts - you know, people say:
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    "When are we gonna fly
    normal people to space?"
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    It just cracks me up.
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    Like we're some sort of weird,
    weird, strange sub-species,
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    or strange breed in the
    astronaut preserve,
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    or we all grew up together,
    or something.
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    If you came to any astronaut social,
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    You would realize, we're just a bunch
    of flawed, normal people,
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    doing our best,
    just like anywhere.
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    And so to invite people onboard
    the space station
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    shows that we do have
    real people on the space station.
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    We have poets and artists,
    and engineers and scientists,
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    and photographers and musicians,
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    just like everywhere.
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    And we're trying to make the absolute
    most of this thing that we built,
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    and let people see the results.
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    And then they speak for themselves.
  • 14:42 - 14:44
    And then people will support it,
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    to whatever level they think is appropriate.
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    And that's the way it oughta be.
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    - [Jeff] So the PR people may not be happy,
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    but you and I would probably agree
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    that the immediacy and spontaneity are,
    on the whole, good things.
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    - Sure.
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    I mean we don't -
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    You don't get to go
    live on the space station
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    because you're a myopic idiot.
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    So you don't need to treat the people
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    that are speaking on behalf of the program
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    as if their myopia
    and their inherent idiocy
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    will cause them to constantly
    say bad things.
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    You know?
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    And so -
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    So the openness is important.
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    And people need to think about it.
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    They need to get
    comfortable communicating.
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    Some people are not
    comfortable naturally.
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    But we train to do
    extremely complicated things.
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    We train to do
    very esoteric things.
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    And they're necessary
    to live on the space station.
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    And so, you can
    also train people
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    how to communicate
    what they're up to better.
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    Just like any other skill.
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    And NASA does address that.
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    And they work on it, and they
    train and encourage people,
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    to the maximum extent that
    their nature allows,
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    to communicate what's happening.
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    And our reaction is still
    catching up to the technology,
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    as it often does.
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    But I think we're gonna
    see more and more of it.
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    - [Jeff] Mh-hm.
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    - [Clara] Well, speaking of having
    regular people go up in space,
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    the commercial space industry
    is obviously heating up these days.
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    And more and more people may soon
    get the chance to go up there.
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    What do you think about that?
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    And would you ever consider
    riding Virgin Galactic for example?
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    - Well, sure.
    It's the natural progression.
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    There's all sorts of historical examples
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    of the next generation
    taking what they were raised with,
  • 16:26 - 16:27
    and pushing it to the limit.
  • 16:27 - 16:29
    Whether it is, you know,
  • 16:29 - 16:32
    just my teenage kids
    leaving home in a huff,
  • 16:32 - 16:36
    because they can't stand
    the environment that they grew up in.
  • 16:36 - 16:40
    or whether it's people leaving a country
    because of a famine,
  • 16:40 - 16:42
    or a change where they need
    to seek a better place,
  • 16:42 - 16:45
    or if it's purely just technology,
  • 16:45 - 16:48
    allowing us to go someplace
    that we couldn't go before.
  • 16:48 - 16:50
    Like sail across the Atlantic.
  • 16:50 - 16:52
    Or go live in Antarctica.
  • 16:52 - 16:54
    And the way we've always done that
  • 16:55 - 16:59
    is to have a big organization
    set up a structure.
  • 16:59 - 17:00
    A comfort base.
  • 17:00 - 17:04
    A financial stability that allows us
    to start sending out probes.
  • 17:05 - 17:11
    And then we send probes. In my family,
    in 1827, I think they sent a probe to
  • 17:11 - 17:15
    Canada from Scotland, and it was a
    19-year old. But they sent their
  • 17:15 - 17:23
    19-year old son to Montreal as a probe.
    Go be Mars Curiosity rover for us.
  • 17:23 - 17:27
    We want you to go to Montreal, have a
    look around, see if it's habitable.
  • 17:27 - 17:31
    See what life could be like over there,
    see if there's opportunity.
  • 17:31 - 17:35
    and then report back. And then we
    will make a community decision as to
  • 17:35 - 17:37
    whether we're going to move there or not.
  • 17:37 - 17:41
    We did that in Antarctica, we've been
    sending probes down there, and we realized
  • 17:41 - 17:47
    you know, like Shackleford.. or Shackleton
    and all the other early efforts.
  • 17:47 - 17:50
    And then we found that not only is it
    possible to live there, but it's
Titel:
Chat with Space Station Commander Chris Hadfield - SA Hangout #8
Beschreibung:

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Video Language:
English
Team:
Scientific American
Projekt:
SA Hangout
Duration:
47:14

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