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Power Chord Shifts and Palm Mutes (Guitar Lesson BC-192) Guitar for beginners Stage 9

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    Hello! Justin here. How you doin?
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    In this lesson now we're going to be checking out
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    a little bit of more advanced
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    power chord technique and also introduce
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    a little thing called "palm muting"
    which is a very very cool
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    mainly a rock technique
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    that works on electric guitar
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    but it also sounds very cool
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    on acoustic guitar.
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    You can even use it for your
    12-bar blues stuff as well
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    so it is pretty handy little
    cool thing to do.
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    So the first thing I want to talk about is
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    you've now got your power chords
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    with the 6 strings root and you've also got
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    a power chord with the 5th string root
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    So a really good exercise is
    to practice going through
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    any or all of your power chords
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    and playing them on both
    the 6th string and the 5th string
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    so, if you took, say a C power chord
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    you could have that as the 6th string root
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    at the 8th fret
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    or the 5th string root at the 3rd fret
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    They nearly sound identical
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    You'd also have, say a G chord
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    at the 6th string root, 3rd fret
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    or the 10th fret, 5th string root
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    And you can hear this one sounds an octave higher
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    but they're essentially the same chords.
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    It wouldn't matter if it was written in the music
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    to play one and you played the other
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    It wouldn't matter if "that" or "that"
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    It just sound slightly different
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    It's up to you to choose
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    So that's the first thing
    that's really important to realize
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    that every chord, power chord,
    can be played in 2 different places.
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    It also leads to a little bit of a confusion
    as to which one
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    are you going to choose
    if it just says in the music to play C
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    well, you're going to play
    this C, or this C
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    There's even another one up here.
    so which one are you going to choose?
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    Usually, you're looking for the ones that are
    the easiest to get to
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    Sometimes you might want one
    that is further away
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    deliberately 'cause it's going to sound higher
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    Or 'cause you want to get a sliding effect
    up to it sliding effect up to it
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    But usually you pick the nearest one
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    Now, one of the chord progressions
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    that we looked at in the very first one
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    when we look at power chords
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    with the 6th string root
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    It was the same sequence that went
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    F, B♭
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    A♭ to D♭
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    It's a very very common chord sequence, right?
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    Now, of course jumping around that much
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    if you are playing in a rock band
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    and you're jumping 'round
    and you try to check out
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    all the hot chicks up the front
    and bash your head around
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    and probably swig a bottle
    of Jack Daniels or whatever
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    you try to do at the same time
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    then the last thing you ought to be doing
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    is looking at the guitar
    trying to shift around
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    and get your fingers moving like that
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    It's just not happening.
    So, what we want to do
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    is try to simplify that so the movements
    that you have to make
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    on the neck aren't quite as big.
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    Now the first chord sequence was F to B♭
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    Now, that's a big jump already.
    That's like a five-fret jump.
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    We could also go from F to B♭
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    and stay in the same fret
    because F is in the 1st fret
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    with the 6th string root
    and B♭ is in the
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    1st fret with the 5th string root
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    so, of course, it's going to be
    a bit cooler to go
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    and the next chord was
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    A♭
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    No getting around that
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    you're going to have to make a jump
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    But the next chord was D♭
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    which is also a big five-fret jump
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    Then we could go A♭
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    to D♭
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    because A♭ and D♭
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    are in the same fret too
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    So now we'd have
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    F - B♭ - A♭ - D♭
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    It's really important this,
    that you get the idea
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    of trying to look as you're
    learning a tune
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    especially if you're learning like
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    tabs off the Internet or whatever
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    where it just gives you the chord
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    and you've got no further instruction
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    That you really think about
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    which chords you might use
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    and also try and listen
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    because it takes a little bit of practice
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    But you can learn to hear
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    Where a power chord might be played
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    if it is this one
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    or this one
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    They sound different, right?
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    So if you try one
    and you try the other one
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    you listen to a record of the song
    that you're trying to play
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    you will listen to it and go
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    "Well, that sounds like the high one"
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    and you're probably right
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    Remember, these little inside of head attachments
    I don't mean my hat, I mean the ears
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    Those things are really really good
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    at helping you play guitar
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    because they tell the truth
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    they say "yeah, this one sounds right" or
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    "that one doesn't sound right"
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    So, make sure you trust your ears
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    that's really important
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    So, have a little fiddle
    about where you play
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    what power chords
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    and the thing I want to explain
    to you right now
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    is thing called "Palm Muting", right?
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    I'm just going to play a G power chord
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    so "this" would be kind of normal
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    that's palm muted
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    Normal
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    palm muted
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    and the reason it's called a "Palm Mute"
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    is because we are using
    this part of our hand
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    the outside of your hand.
    The bit that you might do
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    a karate chop with
    if you're karate chopping a–
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    not that they really do karate chops
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    but I think you probably know what I mean
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    It's that little outside bit of your hand
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    and you're going to rest that
    right on the strings
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    at the back of the guitar.
    Just if you look where
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    the actual bridge is where
    the strings are making contact
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    with the bridge, the saddles
    you're putting it right on there
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    Just lean it forward
    a little bit so you can play
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    your chord (♪)
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    and you've got a palm mute effect.
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    Now what's interesting is
    the further back you go
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    Now we've got no palm mute
    'cause we're off the back of the...
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    the palm is not touching the strings
    as you bring it forward
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    you get more and more muted
    until you just get clicky
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    and it doesn't make any sense
    So, any further then, say
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    two inches away from the bridge
    you don't really get a sound
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    you just get kind of a click
    But what you're really after there
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    is just bringing it forward a bit
    that kind of a muddies it up.
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    If you're playing Metallica or Green Day
    or something like that
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    That would be a really
    cool effect to be doing
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    especially, if you kind of play
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    some with the palm muting
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    some without
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    That kind of thing
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    It is really worth being able
    to play a chord
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    2 and 3 and 4 and
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    So the first one
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    open
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    then 2 and 3 and 4 and
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    are all muted
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    Really a good technique
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    to get used to with this thing
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    where you're resting it on the guitar
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    it does make it sound kind of heavy
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    especially with a lot of distortion
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    it gives that rock-metal sound
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    but it also sounds cool
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    with the blues
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    If we think back to our regular
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    12-bar blues rhythm
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    we add a little bit of palm mute
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    sounds pretty cool, I reckon like that
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    No palm mute
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    with the palm mute back on
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    It is definitely something that
    you want to check out there
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    A little bit of palm mute
    on your 12-bar blues
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    always sounds good
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    so have a little bit of an experiment
    with this palm mute
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    See if you can learn to listen to it
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    so when you are listening to a track
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    that you're trying to play
    and you've got the tab out
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    whatever and you're trying to figure it out
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    or, even better, you're transcribing
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    a song by yourself, just use your ears
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    and try and hear "Oh, is he using
    any palm mute there, or not?"
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    and then, as you get used to it
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    you hear it more and you've played it more
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    you will start to recognize it
    pretty quickly
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    and be able to use it whenever you like
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    So, I hope you've enjoyed that
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    and I'll see you for another lesson
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    sometime really soon
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    Take care!
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    Bye-bye
Títol:
Power Chord Shifts and Palm Mutes (Guitar Lesson BC-192) Guitar for beginners Stage 9
Descripció:

Justin's Completely Free, Beginners Guitar Course Lesson BC-192.
This is Stage 9, Lesson 2.

This video further explores Power Chords and shows you how to shift them easily and how to use Palm Muting.

Find the related course notes on the following link:
http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-192-PowerChordPalmMute.php

The Justinguitar Beginners Guitar Course, a series of over 100 lessons on guitar for beginners. Text support is on the web site and also in a proper old skool paper book which can be ordered from the web site of your local music store :)

Taught by Justin Sandercoe.

Full support at the justinguitar web site where you will find hundreds of lessons on a wide range of subjects, and all the scales and chords that you will ever need! There is a great forum too to get help, no matter what the problem.

And it is all totally free, no bull. No sample lessons, no memberships, no free ebook. Just tons of great lessons :)

To get help with this lesson (and for further info and tabs), find the Lesson ID in the video title (like ST-667 or whatever) and then look it up on the Lesson Index page of justinguitar.com

http://www.justinguitar.com

Have fun :)

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Video Language:
English
Team:
JustinGuitar (legacy)
Projecte:
Beginners Course (BC)
Duration:
07:28

English subtitles

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